BRIAN 10.7.6 -- Mac OS

The Peggy Lee Bio-Discography:
Appearances With Bing Crosby
(On The Radio, Part VIII)

by Iván Santiago

Page generated on Jul 8, 2021





Scope And Contents

This page is dedicated to the appearances that Peggy Lee made in Bing Crosby's radio shows. During a seven-year span (1946-1953), Lee appeared in 50 episodes of Crosby's program, performing a total of 139 musical numbers. About a third of that output consisted of solo vocals. The remainder comprised duets with the host, as well as a few trios and quartets. Readers interested in an alphabetical listing of all 139 numbers are welcome to consult the index at the very bottom of this page.

Peggy Lee stands alone as the only female singer to appear in four different editions of Crosby's show -- Kraft, Philco, Chesterfield, General Electric. Even among males, this statistic does not seem to have been matched by anyone other than Bob Hope. In the edition for which she most frequently performed (Philco Radio Time), Lee's billing alternated between cast member and special guest. In essence, her standing should best described as that of a semi-regular.

Lee actually ranks within the top three of Bing Crosby's most frequent female duet partners on his radio series. She is only bested by Rosemary Clooney, whose inordinately large amount of radio appearances with Crosby (over 700) is explained by the fact that she co-hosted a pre-taped five-minute morning radio show with Crosby in the early 1960s. The 2nd and 3rd placements are close enough to qualify as a tie. One of slots belongs to Connee Boswell, who was Crosby's resident chanteuse during the entire 1941-1942 season of his show, and who appeared in a total of 49 episodes (a few of them previous and a few of them subsequent to her residency). Boswell's placement is fortified by the fact that, many years before her residency, she had already appeared in many a Crosby broadcast, though as a member of the group The Boswell Sisters. (The group was actually part of the regular cast of Bing Crosby Entertains; The Makers Of Woodbury Facial Soap Present Bing Crosby.) The other slot of course belongs to Peggy Lee, thanks to the aforementioned total of 50 appearances.





Photos

Top: Mementoes from the year 1948, when Peggy Lee was a semi-regular member of Bing Crosby's Philco Radio Time cast. First up is a Bing Crosby ad, published on several magazines of the day. Crosby's image is enlisted to promote both a gentleman's accessory (the Stetson Hat) and the gentleman's own, most recent feature film at that time (The Emperor Waltz). For the record, I should add that this Stetson ad is by no means Crosby's only promotion of the hat brand on paper; I've seen at least two other ads in vintage magazines. The second memento is a Peggy Lee publicity shot, autographed by the singer herself. It reads: "To Hazel, enjoyed your show and enjoyed seeing you; sincerely, Peggy Lee." Given the stated name of the addressee and the reference to a show of hers, there is a good chance that the original recipient of this autograph was the celebrated jazz pianist Hazel Scott.

Right above: during their respective lifetimes, both Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee were witnesses to the publication of more than one coloring book in their honor. Those on display here are from 1940 (prairie Bing), 1954 (rehearsing Bing), and 1961 (jacketed Peggy). In the early 1940s, a coloring book featuring both Peggy Lee and Benny Goodman was also published.


Format And Crossreferences

As already mentioned, Peggy Lee was a frequent supporting presence in Bing Crosby's broadcasting career of the 1940s. This page follows her appearances chronologically, beginning with the songstress' guest debut on an episode of Crosby's Kraft Music Hall (1946), moving on to her many appearances as a semi-regular member of Philco Radio Time (1946-1949), and continuing through yet 16 more guest appearances on the two shows that Der Bingle hosted subsequently, one sponsored by Chesterfield (1949-1952) and the other by General Electric (1952-1954).

For each of these shows, an introductory section has been provided. Naturally, such introductions precede my presentation of the actual sessions or broadcast tapings on which Peggy Lee participated. For instance, you will see immediately below my intro for Kraft Music Hall, Starring Bing Crosby, followed by an account of the May 2, 1946 Kraft broadcast with which Lee and Crosby began their long professional association. The same pattern applies to the other three radio series, though one of them has an additional feature: each season of Philco Radio Time come with its own, separate introductory section. ( That series is of historical importance to the golden age of radio. Of even greater relevance for us is the fact that most of Lee's radio work for Crosby work was done on Philco Radio Time, with the songstress performing as a semi-regular member of the crooner's roster.)

Indexes of songs are located at the bottom of the page. The indexes are preceded by an appendix offering short biographical commentary about some of Crosby's steady partners in crime during his travels through Radioland.

Photography is also abundantly supplied throughout this page. In fact, the notes under each session offer at least two pictures, and the introductions typically offer a lot more than two. The images have been chosen on the basis of their connection to either the surrounding text or the participants of the radio shows under scrutiny. As a supplementary project which will hopefully entertain and arouse the curiosity of the viewers, the page has also been sprinkled with a liberal serving of -- shall we say -- aromatic cigar ashes. I have made it my mission to catch that "smoking" specimen of a man, Mr. Crosby, over and over in the act of inhaling from his iconic pipe, and to present much of the evidence here. (My missionary ways were put to the test by the sheer number of smoker shots across which I came. There are enough to fill a coffee book. Coming to terms with this realization, I finally had to quit with my addictive project, limiting the exhibit herein to just the most smoking of the Groaner's mug shots. And yet, even after such self-imposed limitations, this projects is divided into a sizable total of 33 parts.)

Readers interested in Crosbyana are welcome to also consult my overview of Bing Crosby's radio career, found among the supplementary pages of this discography. Of further interest should be the two pictorial pages that this Peggy Lee discography dedicates to CDs and LPs containing her collaborations with Crosby at the Decca studios and over the radio airwaves.








Kraft Music Hall, Starring Bing Crosby


The best-known and longest-lasting of Bing Crosby's shows was Kraft Music Hall, on the NBC radio network. He hosted this show from December 5, 1935 to May 9, 1946, with only a half-season break in the fall of 1945. Although Crosby had already done hosting duties on at least three other series by then (earlier in the 1930s), it was during the Kraft years that he rose to star status in the radio field.

Several individuals remained with Der Bingle's throughout his ten-year Kraft tenure. Two of those long-term regulars merit mention herein. Ken Carpenter (1908-1975) served as the show's announcer from 1936 to the end of the series. Conductor John Scott Trotter (1900-1984) waas first heard on the July 1, 1937 broadcast, and the show's orchestra continued to be under his direction until Crosby's departure in 1946. Both men rank high as definitive companions in Le Bing's music career; their time period working for him extended far beyond the Kraft Music Hall days. (The bandleader did so until 1954, when Crosby began his transition from primetime to more modest, less-orchestra-friendly daytime programming. While also doing similar duty for many another radio host, the announcer stayed in place until the last year of the Old Groaner's radio career.) Additional details about these and other key players in El Bingo's team can be found in this page's appendix (located near the bottom, right before the indexes).

Peggy Lee's debut appearance in Bing Radioland happened near the very end of his days as the host of Kraft Music Hall. Lee guested on the penultimate episode of Crosby's tenure. As all other episodes of that season, this one was originally broadcast on a Thursday, between 6:00 and 6:30 p.m., Eastern Standard Time (9:00 to 9:30 p.m. on the West Coast). It happened to be a special installment in the series: Bing Crosby's 43rd birthday was celebrated during the last minutes, with an unscheduled appearance by Bob Hope. Further details will be given below, under the broadcast session dated May 2, 1946.





Photos


Top of this section: Crosby memorabilia, all of it connected to the seasons he spent as the host of Kraft Music Hall. First we see a coaster, whose design in also reproduced on the third and last image, about which I do not have concrete details. It looks like a flyer, or perhaps an ad placed on a periodical. (These graphics, shared by the ad and the coaster, were also used as the top surface of a lid belonging to a Kraft mayonnaise jar. The design might have thus been characteristic or standard, for the show's advertisement.) As fort he central image, it is the front cover of a 1977 LP released by Spokane, a fan label dedicated to issuing collectible Crosby radio material. One out of over 30 issues on the label, this particular LP contains the January 29, 1942 episode of Kraft Music Hall.

Right above: two shots of the Hollywood NBC compound, as it looked for most of the 1940s. Most prominent in the first shot is the compound's lobby or foyer -- a three-story structure located exactly at the corner of the Sunset and Vine intersection. The second shot allows us to take a closer look at the right side of the building, from a different angle. This view reveals the presence of the initials RCA in the back of the foyer. Those initials amounted to ownership branding. (At this point in time, NBC was owned by RCA.) They also identified who had provided the compound with its state-o-the-art equipment and technology.

Following the lobby, the second image showcases the entrances to two studios, of which the most relevant for our discussion will be B. Not visible in this picture are the entrances to studios C and D, right on this same Sunset Boulevard block, before Argyle Street. (Entrances to yet more studios, also identified by alphabet letters, ran parallel to those four on the opposite side of the building, between Vine and Argyle streets.)

The compound counted with numerous other areas, from storage space and a music library to extensive garage parking and an entire adjunct building for RCA's regional and sales offices, (plus a film exchange department. In the first photo, to the left of the lobby, we catch a partial view of the administrative offices as well.

First row, right below: colorful photos of NBC and Bing Crosby, as they looked during the first half of the 1940s. No specifics about the Crosby color transparency are known to me. The fact that he is standing behind an NBC microphone strongly suggests that he inside the NBC compound, rehearsing for or carrying out an episode of either NBC's Kraft Music Hall or ABC's Philco Radio Time.

Second row below: a later, undated photo of NBC. It is likely to be from the 1950s (1949 at the earliest); note the addition of the TV sign of the NBC letters. See also photography in the section dedicated to Philco Radio Time (following right after the May 2, 1946 date).






Venue


According to Crosby radio discographer Lionel Pairpoint, the crooner's edition of Kraft Music Hall was originally broadcast "from NBC’s Studio B, a big barn-like building on the backlot of the RKO Studios at Melrose and Gower." Similarly, Crosby biographer Gary Giddins refers to NBC's Studio B as "a temporary set up on the back lot at RKO." Of equal relevance is author and broadcaster Chuck Schaden's 1972 interview with bandleader John Scott Trotter, who told Schaden that "originally [Kraft Music Hall] was down at Melrose which was a small studio and now is KHJ, I believe." All three references seem to be to a facility more properly known as the KHJ studio at 5515 Melrose Avenue.

5515 Melrose was NBC's first facility in the Los Angeles area. The network occupied it from December 1935 to October 1938, by which time it had begun to outgrow it. (Earlier in the 1930s, network radio shows were being broadcast from New York. A tiny number were exceptionally beamed from San Francisco. One of the major factors that made the transition to LA possible was AT&T's construction of a new broadcast circuit which, unless the previous one, extended to Los Angeles rather than San Francisco.) After NBC left the premises, 5115 Melrose went on to serve as the recording and/or broadcasting studios of several other companies of note, including Capitol Records from 1949 to 1956.

As viewers can probably surmise already, NBC left Melrose And Gower right after the end of the construction of its brand new facilities, at the intersection of Vine Street and Sunset Boulevard. Variously known as NBC Hollywood Studios, or NBC West Coast Radio City, or more simply NBC Radio City, the compound officially opened on October 17, 1938. Kraft Music Hall is on record as being broadcast from there since the start of its fourth season, on October 20, 1938. (There would be six and half additional Kraft seasons. Peggy Lee guested only once, on that last half.)

The huge facilities covered a two-block, four-and-a-half-acre area. Air-conditioned, the main compound consisted of a three-story executive building, four studio-auditoriums with roughly a 340-seat capacity each, and eight additional studios of different sizes. (Two of those 12 studios were built belatedly, post-war. NBC also counted with a studio outside of the compound, at a MGM soundstage.) Each Radio City studio answered to a letter from A to L. The entrance to studios A, B, C and D faced Sunset Boulevard. Those four rooms were separated from one another by glass brick walls. The larger ones, A and D, had been built to look identical, each with the same sitting capacity, plus 3,000 feet of stage space (50' by 60' deep). Similarly built to resemble one another had been studios C and D, with a comparatively smaller, 2,000 square feet stage (45' by 45'), but still holding the same seating capacity as A and D. The only obvious difference, as far as I have been able to ascertain, was the color of their painted areas. (To see pictures of one of these studios, scroll past the May 2, 1946 session right below, and look into the Philco Radio Time section.)

Both here at Radio City and previously at Melrose, Crosby's show was broadcast from a studio that answered to the letter B, and which was also known for being the home of Jack Benny's radio show. As we are informed by the April 27, 1939 issue of Radio Mirror, "Bing's program comes from the same Studio B that Jack Benny uses. It seats only 320 people, and is filled every time it's used. Visitors often remark on its pleasant and tasteful color scheme, robin's-egg blue and deep red ..." If word of mouth is to be trusted, the B letter had been bestowed on both Melrose and Vine studios in honor of Benny, Bing, or both.

NBC remained on the Sunset and Vine compound from 1938 until its demolishment in 1964. By that year, the network had already moved, once again, to facilities that were larger. They were also more suitable to the TV era than to the bygone world of variety radio. (For more information, consult my main source on matters NBC, Bobby Ellerbee's excellent History Of NBC West Coast Studios. It is thanks to Ellerbee that I have been able to provide herein minutia such as the studios' dimensions and capacity.)


Date: May 2, 1946 (Broadcast Date)
Location: Studio B, NBC West Coast Radio City, Hollywood, California
Label: Kraft Music Hall, Starring Bing Crosby (11th Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Perry Botkin, Jr. (g), Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (NBC) I Don't Know Enough About You - 3:07(Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscP 607 - P 608 — Basic Music Library [1 Peggy Lee vocal; also Bing Crosby, Bob Simmers numbers]   (1946)
Sounds Of Yesteryear Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) 9420 — [Bing Crosby] A.F.R.S. Basic Music Library, Volume 2   (2013)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 2431 — Basic Music Library (Programs P452, P550, P552, P600, P607)   
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (NBC) I Don't Know Enough About You - 2:21(Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription Disc178 — [Bing Crosby] Music Hall    (1946)
Totem Collectors' Label commercial CDr579 — [Bing Crosby] Kraft Music Hall    
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 579 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   






Photos

Above: Bing Crosby with and without Peggy Lee. The first photo bears a 1947 publication date. By that year, Crosby was long gone from his hosting job on NBC's Kraft Music Hall and ensconced on to his next gig, at ABC's Philco Radio Time. If this picture was actually taken in 1947 (rather than just published on that year), then the presence of a NBC microphone might be explained by the fact that, at this early point in the history of ABC, the young network was sharing technical equipment with NBC. (During my navigation on the web, I have come across a statement from a seller who states that this photo is from 1944, but I have found no indication that his claim is accurate.)

Also dating from well past the Kraft Music Hall period, the second photo was probably taken on November 29, 1949, when the singing pair was filming a duet performance for his movie Mr. Music. The cameraman has caught the pair as they were checking the sheet music for a Burke-Van Heusen number, which they were scheduled to perform as a duet on the screen.

Down below: two issues, one a transcription disc, the other a CDr sold by a collectors' mail order label, each containing a diffrent May 2, 1946 version of "I Don't Know Enough About You."


Schedule

A rehearsal for this episode took place from 10:00 in the morning to 2:00 in the afternoon. A second rehearsal ensued, from 3:30 to 5:00. The half-hour broadcast aired at 6:00 p.m. (its regular slot). I have located a photo probably taken at one of the rehearsals. To see it, scroll down to the January 1, 1947 episode.


Peggy Lee's Reminiscences

In her autobiography, Peggy Lee expresses a deep sense of gratitude and admiration for Bing Crosby. Amidst the various Crosby-related anecdotes that she shares, there is a reference to an appearance in one of Crosby's Kraft shows: Bing was also so protective of me. Once he found me standing rigid outside the studio at NBC and asked what he could do to help me. He was so sensitive to my early days of nerves and self-consciousness. This was just before airtime on one of Bing's many Kraft programs. I managed to say something like: "When you introduce me, would you please not leave me out there on the stage alone? Would you stand where I can see your feet?" He agreed and always sort of casually leaned on a speaker or piano to give me the support and time I needed to learn about being at ease onstage. You have to love a man like that. He offered everything -- money, cars, his own blood, and even volunteered to personally babysit with our little daughter, Nicki, while [my husband] David was so sick in the hospital. If Peggy Lee is accurately recalling the episode in question as being part of Crosby's Kraft Music Hall series, then she is referring to the present, May 2, 1946 installment, as Lee was not part of any other Kraft episode hosted by Crosby.

In an article written for the September 7, 1947 issue of Radio Life, Peggy Lee had plenty more to add. The following is an excerpt from that article: ... Like ninety million others I've always been a Crosby fan ... He has great consideration for others, and understands so well how to make things easier for them ... But to get to the ... program, rehearsals are always relaxed and friendly with Bing's great sense of comedy showing up at frequent intervals ... his shirts, his ice ream, and his jokes. He is surrounded by pleasant people such as John Scott Trotter, Ken Carpenter, Bill Morrow, Mac McIntyre, Jane Hill ... So, when someone asks me what it's like to work with Bing Crosby, I think how lucky I am to be in a position to answer, "It's very, very pleasant." These particular comments were written by Lee when she already had over a dozen episodes of the show under her belt, having been a regular for over a season -- i.e., long after the present debut episode.


Personnel (Part I)

1. Episode's Guests
2. Bob Hope & Two May-Weather Birthday Artists
Identified by announcer Ken Carpenter as the show's guests are "the lovely songstress Peggy Lee and racetrack man -- the bookmakers' pinup boy -- Joe Frisco." Per the show's customary policy, Carpenter makes this announcement at the start of the program. At the end of the episode, Bob Hope makes a surprise, unannounced appearance. He brings in a birthday cake for Crosby, who would turn 43 on the next day -- the third of May. (On the 26th of the same month, Peggy Lee would turn 26.)


Patter

1. Introduction Of Peggy Lee
Peggy Lee's debut in the world of Crosby radio is preceded by the following words from the show's host: "A very handy little lady with any kind of a tune is our guest this evening. A highly personable, attractive young lady who has been hitting the jackpot with her recordings in just about every jukebox in the land. Here she is, Miss Peggy Lee." Applause from the audience ensues.

2. Preamble To "I Don't Know Enough About You"
Bing: Good evening.
Peggy: Good evening, Bing.
Bing: How are you, Peg?
Peggy: Well, I didn't know it was your birthday, Bing. I would have brought you a bag of gumdrops, or something.
Bing: Well, I'll take a check on the gumdrops, Peggy, but if you got a song in you, I'll settle for that.
Peggy: Alright, Bing. How about I Don't Know Enough About You?
Bing: Sounds clever. You wrote this song, didn't you, Peggy?
Peggy: Um-hmm.
Bing: And a lot of others. We'll lay it in there.

3. Postscript To "I Don't Know Enough About You"
After Peggy Lee finishes singing, and as the audience's applause is about to subside, Bing Crosby is heard making this somewhat curious comment: "Oh yes. That is worth the money, hmm?" There is no clear context for the comment, which could be taken as a figurative way of complimenting Lee's performance, and nothing more. I am left to wonder, however, if there was a pointed subtext to the comment: could it be that Lee's management had asked for a hefty fee?

Be that as it may, the Peggy Lee segment of the show closes with Crosby's comment. She does not appear in the rest of the episode. What's more, her participation is not even acknowledged during the closing credits. Since acknowledgment of the guests was customary at both the beginning and the end of the episodes, this omission is curious. It is likely to have been an unintentional oversight -- a side effect of the impromptu birthday celebration. Because of Bob Hope's unscheduled appearance and the ensuing singing of "Happy Birthday" in the host's honor, Crosby and Carpenter might have had to rush their reading of the closing credits, inadvertently skipping the credit to Lee in the process.






Songs & Issues

1. The Two Versions Of "I Don't Know Enough About You"
2. American Forces Radio Service's Basic Music Library P-607 & P-608 [ET]
Another unusual detail about this episode is that Lee's solo has been preserved in not one but two versions. One version clocks in at 2:21, the other at 3:07.

The shorter version is the one that was heard during the broadcast (at least in the West Coast). It is also the version heard on both Totem and Redmond Nostalgia CDrs listed above.

I have found no documentation about the 3:07 version, nor do I have evidence that it was broadcast. This longer version can be heard in the above-pictured AFRS transcription disc from the American Forces' Basic Music Library. That disc consists entirely of Bing Crosby vocals, except for Lee's number. I should clarify that the disc only lets us know who the tracks' performers are -- not from where the performances came. Fortunately, the song titles give away their source: all of them were sung in Kraft Music Hall, the vast majority during the 1946 season.

But, of course, we already know that this 3:07 version was not actually heard in the broadcast itself. We thus have a mystery in our hands.

Despite the absence of any factual data, the 3:07 version can be safely incorporated to this session on account of its extreme similarity to the 2:21 version. They are so similar that the latter sounds like an edit of the former. The main difference is the inclusion of an instrumental interlude and an additional chorus in the 3:07 version, both of them absent from the 2:21 version.

Could the AFRS track then be a full version of a performance that was edited for the actual broadcast? Since Crosby's Kraft Music Hall radio shows were not pre-recorded but broadcast live, the creation of an edit does not seem at all likely. (It was not until the show's subsequent sponsorship from Philco that the episodes began to be pre-recorded.)

A more plausible explanation for the 3:07 version of "I Don't Know Enough About You" is that it originates in the East coast enactment of the episode. (Due to the different time zones in the United States, each live episode had to be performed twice, once for the West coast and once for the East coast.) Unless both broadcasts featured the 'surprise' birthday appearance, there would have been enough time for a longer Peggy Lee vocal in the Hope-less broadcast.

An even likelier possibility is that the 3:21 version comes from the show's rehearsal. In his theory (to which I am leaning), the rehearsal would have been recorded to disc for use by AFRS or other entities.

3. Solos And Duets
Most of Peggy Lee's visits to Bing Crosby's show followed the tried-and-true pattern of one solo vocal and one duet with the host. (Sometimes, the pattern was expanded: Crosby and Lee would do more than one duet or, less frequently, she would sing more than one solo.) The pattern was not followed on this debut episode, however. Lee did only a solo rendition of her self-penned hit "I Don't Know Enough About You." Perhaps a prospective duet had to be skipped to make time for the celebration of Crosby's birthday.


Personnel (Part II)

3. John Scott Trotter, Conductor And Arranger
John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra provided the accompaniment for all the episodes of Bing Crosby's show that featured Peggy Lee. Naturally, he did not play in every single rendition. Some selections featured only the members of the rhythm section, rather than the full orchestra. Besides, certain guests brought their own musicians. Peggy Lee herself would sometimes be accompanied by husband Dave Barbour, who was not a member of Trotter's orchestra.

Trotter also served as arranger for the show's selections. Of course, some songs must have not needed Trotter's arranging skills; they might have featured head arrangements, or they might have been straightforward rhythm section performances. It should also be acknowledged that, like other busy arrangers, Trotter is known to have farmed out arrangements from time to time, anonymously enlisting the likes of Billy May and Nelson Riddle. Still, the arranger-bandleader and his orchestra were behind the bulk of the performances that are listed in this page.

4. The Members Of The John Scott Trotter Orchestra
The Trotter orchestra's members are identified by name in a handful of the sessions below (January 1, 1947; February 11, 1948; January 26, 1949; September 21, 1949). For all other sessions, we can only speculate that the personnel was similar. Since there is a span of 8 years between the first and last of the episodes to be discussed, changes in the orchestra's membership are likely to have occurred through the years (and through the various incarnations of Crosby's show). More data on the show's personnel is offered in an appendix near the end of this page

5. The Date's Unidentified Guitarist (Dave Barbour, Perry Botkin Jr., Les Paul)
Since the 1930s, Perry Botkin, Sr. was Bing Crosby's regular guitarist on both record dates and radio broadcasts. Botkin also played banjo, lute, ukulele, and other strings. We know that Botkin was present during the episode under discussion because Crosby addresses him at the start of the program. "Get the guitar right in there, Perry," the crooner is heard to say, as he is about to sing his theme song. Hence I have tentatively listed Botkin as one of the musicians who played on Peggy Lee's number, whose bridge prominently features guitar.

The main reason for the tentativeness is that, as has already been noted, Lee often came to the shows in the company of her husband, guitarist Dave Barbour. On such occasions, he would usually back her. (Then again, those other episodes consistently include on-air acknowledgment of Barbour's presence. Crosby credits barbour by full name. No such credit is heard in the present episode. Also pertinent to this discussion is Lee's already quoted anecdote in which her young nervous self was standing alone in front of the NBC studios. Her loneliness adds to the vague impression that she came to this broadcast without her husband.)

Yet a third possibility: Lee Paul on guitar. In fact, the above-listed CD from Submarine Records credits Paul as the man accompanying Peggy Lee. nevertheless, I do not know of a valid reason for this credit or attribution. Not owning a copy of the CD, I can only wonder if the notes include an explanation for the attribution. (I doubt that they do.) Be that as it may, I have seen the track listing, and noticed that the track which precedes "I Don't Know Enough About You" also identifies Les Paul as the accompanist. The track is "It's Been A Long, Long Time." The Les Paul Trio was indeed featured in the 1945 version of that song which Crosby sang and Decca released. I suspect that the makers of the Submarine CD have assumed that, since Paul was accompanying Crosby on "It's Been A Long, Long Time," Paul must also be playing in the next track from Program 607 of the AFRS Basic Music Library series. If such an assumption was made, the makers of the CD erred. For AFRS programs, tracks were often culled from a variety of dates and sources; "I Don't Know Enough About You" and "It's Been A Long, Long Time" are not from the same date.





Philco Radio Time


Bing Crosby left NBC's Kraft Music Hall to be the host of ABC's Philco Radio Time. Having signed a contract for three seasons, his tenure started with an episode that aired on October 16, 1946 and concluded with another broadcasted on June 1, 1949. The half-an-hour series aired on Wednesdays at 9:00 p.m. in the West Coast but at 10:00 p.m. in the East Coast. Not for the entire run, though. By its third season (and possibly earlier), the program had been moved to the 9:00 p.m. slot in the East Coast, too.) As for the show's main on-air personnel, announcer Ken Carpenter and bandleader Johnny Scott Trotter were holdovers from the Kraft period. They would continue to work, side by side by Crosby, for the entire run of not only Philco Radio Show but also his subsequent radio shows.

Philco Radio Time is an important show in the history of radio and in the trajectory of Crosby's career. It introduced to the airwaves the concept of pre-taping, which in just a few more years would fully take over, becoming the norm not only on radio but also at the recording studio. (For additional details, see October 1, 1947 entry below.) The series also marked a rise in power for The Old Groaner: the show was essentially developed as a Crosby vehicle, a situation of which the host wisely took full advantage. He was granted a substantial amount of executive control and creative freedom. As in past years, his incursions in the world of radio brought to him a fair amount of publicity and prestige. Even the tapings themselves enhanced Crosby's standing within the music industry. In the November 1946 issue of Capitol News, Dave Dexter, Jr. observes that the "[b]iggest social events of the fall season hereabouts are the Bing Crosby bashes. Bingo cuts a raft of transcribed radio shows in advance for his Wednesday ABC series and everyone in Hollywood tries to sit in on the festivities."

Peggy Lee was Philco Radio Time's semi-regular girl singer, appearing in 34 or 35 of the series' 108 episodes. (One appearance is in contention; see May 7, 1947 date.) She did not appear on the season's earliest episodes, however. Those featured Lina Romay as the regular girl singer. Romay was gone -- or was let go -- after the first season's sixth installment, broadcast on November 20, 1946. (She would make one single return appearance, on the show's January 22, 1947 broadcast, which had been recorded early that month.)

A promotional write-up in the October 1946 issue of the magazine Capitol News claims that Lee had been "wanted for Bing Crosby's Philco series but [the success of her current engagement at New York's] Paramount kept her from accepting." Serving as evidence of Crosby's wish to hire Lee from the show's outset is a letter which he wrote to Bill Morrow, on June 3, 1946. At that early stage, Philco had yet to place its winning bid for Bing's radio hosting services, and General Motors' offer was in the lead. "The General Motors transcribed show is very hot rite now for about September opening," declares Crosby in the letter, dated when Philco had not yet come into the bidding war for . He goes on to propose a lineup consisting of scriptwriter Morrow, producer Glen Wheaton, bandleader John Scott Trotter, guitarist Les Paul, pianist Skitch Henderson, vocal group The Charioteers and, as the "accompanist" (presumably meaning his female partner on the show), "Peggy Lee or some[one] with a similar delivery." For the most part, Crosby's wishes came true. Only Les Paul and Peggy Lee were missing from the debut lineup. (Paul eventually showed up as a featured guest, but only for about four episodes of the first season.)

As for Miss Lee, she joined the cast on the December 18, 1946 episode -- on the third week after Lina Romay's departure. There is room to speculate that the Crosby team was waiting for her to return from New York to join the show, and that Romay had been hired just for the weeks that Lee was away. (Note that these comments are speculative, and could thus turn out to be off the mark.) The aforementioned Capitol News makes reference to a formal Philco Radio Time contract being offered to Lee in January of 1947. That contract was not signed by Lee's because it was not to her liking. She did sing a subsequent, modified contract, presented to her in February of 1947 -- thereby becoming at that time, finally and officially, a regular member of the show.


Lee's 34- (or 35-)episode log can be itemized as follows: 12 or 13 from the first season (1946-1947), six from the second season (1947-1948), and 13 from the third season (1948-1949). As suggested by the comments made in the preceding paragraph, Crosby, Philco and ABC had probably made general plans for her to appear in even more episodes. Such plans were thwarted when Lee signed instead with The Jimmy Durante Show For Rexall, becoming Durante's regular female singer through the full 1947-1948 season.

For some stretches, Philco Radio Time billed Peggy Lee as part of its cast; for other stretches, she was billed as a guest. No other so-called guest came anywhere near the amount of appearances amassed by Lee. The series actually enjoyed the visits of quite a few guests, both male and female, but most of them guested just once or twice, with merely a handful showing up on three or more occasions. After Lee, the largest number of guest appearances (five or six) were made by Bob Hope, Jimmy Durante, Al Jolson, and Alec Templeton.

The first season of Bing Crosby's Philco Radio Time started on October 16, 1946 and concluded on June 18, 1947. During that span, a total of 36 episodes were aired. Peggy Lee's appearances throughout the season will be discussed next, episode by episode. For a less Lee-centered, more general overview of the Philco series, consult the supplementary page that this discography dedicated to Bing Crosby's career (especially, section VI from that page, and the ones that follow.)






Photos

Top of the section: Three Philco ads. The first two reveal that the Philco-Crosby connection predated his hiring to be a host for the company's radio show. As early as 1932, the sponsor was already paying fees for the use of the crooner's image in advertisements: "Bing Crosby tunes in with his Philco," the maker of radios wanted customers to know. Efficiently promoting the sponsor's show, product, and host all at once, the remaining advertisement dates from Bing's actual period as a host of Philco Radio Time (1946-1949).

Right above: four colorful photos, all of them taken near Sunset Boulevard. The first two images bring us back to NBC's West Coast compound, located in the northeast corner of Sunset and Vine, Hollywood. (See also photography in this page's preceding Philco Radio Time section.)

The other two images spotlight a different, smaller building nearby. ABC began to rent this building in 1948. Made into the network's headquarters, the place became known as ABC Radio Center. We see a postcard version of the building in the third image, and a colorized night shot in the fourth image. It was located across the street from the NBC compound, though well past the corner on which the compound's lobby was located. (Of special note in the fourth image is the sighting of Sy Devore's tailor shop, frequented by Hollywood actors and Capitol stars -- and mentioned by Peggy Lee in her autobiography.)

The ABC site is actually visible in all four of these photos -- not just the last two. However, it is harder to spot in the first two phots, due to its distance from the camera lens. As already intimated, it is located further down NBC, and across the street. You will have an easier time finding it in the second photo: search for the red letters ("ABC"), placed vertically in front of the building. Also painted red, there is a very visible neon sign on the top of the building. (We can see in the third image that the color of the neon sign was eventually and suitably changed from red to blue.) As for the first image, this photo seems to date from the period during which the building was being remodeled for ABC's eventual occupation. Hence the neon sign looks to be in a transitional state -- not yet bearing its new "American Broadcasting Company" identification yet already stripped of its former letters, which advertised the previous main occupant ("Bowling - Hollywood Recreation Center - Air Conditioned").

I would still be remiss if I were to to omit a brief mention of yet another building visible in these photos, even if I must grant that it is of no direct concern to our current discussion. Also a corner building, the building in question is across the NBC compound, and can be seen best on the second image. Its lower floor was occupied by Wallichs' Music City, the legendary record store. But it is its second floor that merits this discography's attention: that floor housed the main executive and administrative offices of Capitol Records. (The bulk of the label's offices remained therein until the mid-1950s, when they were moved to the impressive architectural construction built expressly for the company, the Capitol Tower. Back in the 1940s, though, Peggy Lee would have only needed to mind the traffic as she shifted gears from a fun radio date with Bing Crosby to a friendly chat with Capitol's biggest honcho and record store owner, Glenn Wallichs.)

Right below: NBC Hollywood Radio City's studio B, along with its adjacent rooms. First we are treated to a generous view of the auditorium, showing the majority of its 340 seats, with the stage visible in the distance. Next we come close to the stage. The stage's main curtain is open, thereby allowing us to peek at the floor, empty at this moment but for a piano and couple of mikes which must have been consistently on display. A second, intermediary curtain covers a portion of the stage from us.

On the left wall we catch sight of two large windows. Those windows are actually sound-proof glass panels. Behind the lower one was the control room, whose interior we partially see in the third image. Behind the upper window was the client's viewing booth (reserved for sponsors and company executives), whose interior we are seeing almost in its entirety in the fourth image.





Venue


In an article from the April 1976 issue of the magazine High Fidelity, recording engineer John T. Mullin explains that he taped each episode of ABC's Philco Radio Time from an NBC standby studio. ABC's use of NBC's facilities was made possible by a past connection between them. In the beginning, they had been sister companies, the former known then as NBC Blue (created 1927), the latter as NBC Red (created 1926). They shared space and personnel, but the younger Blue had lesser status, with original programming broadcast therein often being transferred to Red, if it showed signs of popularity. Long in the making, the siblings' split was officially certified in October 1943, when the sale of Blue was approved by the FCC. Not until June 15, 1945 did the rebranding from Blue to ABC take place, though.

According to Jim Cox in his book American Radio Networks, ABC "retained most existing staff and signed leases on two theaters plus equipment and studios at NBC. For the present, flagship outlet WJZ continued to air from Radio City on a 10-year lease." Cox concentrates in the New York side of the equation, but it stands to reason that the lease (or some variation of it) applied to the California headquarters, too. The recollections of the aforementioned engineer, John T. Mullin, certainly suggest so: "NBC and ABC were still in the same building at Sunset and Vine in Hollywood. Crosby broadcast from what had been one of the major NBC studios. Prior to the breakup, there had been what they called a standby studio, scarcely larger than a hotel room, with two little control rooms at one end. One was the Blue control room, the other was for the NBC Red Network. There was nothing in this studio but a piano, a table, and two microphones ... Once the networks split ... there was no need for the standby studio. So that’s where they set me up. I installed my machines, moved in a sofa and a couple of chairs, and it became a little living room. It was a delightful place to work."

Informal reports about NBC's West Coast compound identify Studios E and F as the ones generally assigned to ABC programming. When compared to studios such as A or D, the smaller size and simple look of those rooms only serve to strengthen the charge that ABC was forever treated as a redheaded stepchild, both before and after its membership in the enterprise.

However, for a show with as high a profile as Bing Crosby's, lesser facilities such as E and F would have not been acceptable. All the extant documentation indicates that Philco Radio Time was held where Crosby's previous show Kraft Music Hall had also been held: at Studio B. For instance, radio discographer Lionel Pairpoint tells us that, on October 10, 1947, at "NBC Studio B, Hollywood, Bing transcribe[d] his first Philco show of the [second] season with Gary Cooper and Peggy Lee."

As previously mentioned, studios A, B, C and D boasted 340-seating capacity each. B counted with 2,000 square foot stage, and so did its twin, C. As already mentioned, the B of the twin studio was seen as synonymous with its two main dwellers, Jack Benny and Bing Crosby. I have already referred to a Daily Mirror article on which this studio is described as "robin's-egg blue and deep red." (I do not count with a description of Studio C's color scheme. Its identifying letter was associated with Charles Boyer, one of the two stars who made it its home, the other being Al Pearce.)


Date: December 11, 1946 (Bradcst Date) (Pre-recrded 11/22 & 11/24)
Location: Hollywood, California
Label: Philco Radio Time Starring Bing Crosby (1st Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Dave Barbour (g), Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) Linger In My Arms A Little Longer - 2:41(Herb Magidson)
Parrot Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Parcd 001 — It's A Good Day {Bing Crosby And Peggy Lee}   (1992)
Castle Communications Licensed CS/CD(United Kingdom) Mat Mc/Cd 316 — Let There Be Love; The Best Of Peggy Lee   (1994)
Hughes Leisure Group Public Domain CD(Australia/New Zealand) Stb 8849 — Peggy Lee ("20 Golden Greats / Starburst" Series)    (1994)
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) It's A Good Day - 1:54(Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee)
Shout Factory Licensed CDDk 31516 — [Bing Crosby] Swingin' With Bing   (2004)
Both titles on:
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 9 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1946)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 153 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   





Photos

The Groaner and his pipes: two 1946 magazine front covers featuring Bing Crosby, "often called American's number one pipe smoker," at least according to the magazine Pipe Lovers. In the July 1946 issue of that publication, we are told that "Bing admits the only time he leaves his pipe alone is when he goes behind the mike on a nationwide broadcast." Furthermore, Bing himself reveals in the same article that he has about 150 pipes in his collection, out of which he preferred an English one that he had received as a gift from his Kraft Hall Music sidekick, musician-turned-comedian Bob Burns. Besides Pipe Lovers, the other magazine featured above is Films Pour Tous, which tended feature French and American actress in its front covers, but could occasionally fall for the manly Hollywood charms of a Bing Crosby, a Gary Cooper, or a Paul Cambo, or even a Fred McMurray. (With these two magazine covers, I have now begun a photographic series that I'm calling The Smokin' Hot Piper, and to which I will continue to add through this page.)


Schedule

According to Crosby chronicler Malcolm Macfarlane, this episode was rehearsed (3:00-4:00 p.m.) and transcribed (6:25-8:30 p.m.) on Sunday, November 24. For his part, Crosby radio authority Lionel Pairpoint lists not one but two days of recording activity (the 22nd and the 24th, as shown above).


Personnel

1. Guests
Announcer Ken Carpenter refers to the episode's guests as "the charming chantoose Peggy Lee and Jerry Beaver Lip Colonna."

2. Solos And Duets
"Linger In My Arms A Little Longer" is a Peggy Lee solo performance. "It's A Good Day" would eventually prove to be the quintessential Lee-Crosby duet. In addition to this initial performance, Crosby and Lee went on to tackle the song on three additional broadcasts (January 8, 1947; March 19, 1947; April 23, 1947). Bing also sang a solo rendition during the June 19, 1947 episode of the show.

3. Dave Barbour
After Peggy Lee finishes her solo, Crosby credits "Peggy's husband, Dave Barbour" as the performance's guitarist.


Songs

1. "It's A Good Day"
The December 11, 1946 issue of Variety includes an ad on behalf of the Barbour-Lee composition. Placed by Capitol Songs, Inc., the ad highlights the fact that the song would be having its radio premiere in this episode of Crosby's show.


Patter And Sketches

1. Introduction Of Peggy Lee And Preamble To "Linger In My Arms A Little Longer"
Claiming that Bing Crosby's show is in need of more glamour, comedian Jerry Colonna tells us that he has "taken the liberty of bringing along three of the most beautiful and seductive stars" in Hollywood. Colonna then introduces the three stars that he has brought with him: Sonya Henie, Esther Williams, and Dorothy Lamour. Or rather, he supposedly introduces them. This is a gag; none of the three ladies is present. Shortly thereafter, Crosby proceeds to pave the way for Peggy Lee's entrance.
Bing: Oh, Jerome, those girls were grand but now if you don't mind I'd like to introduce a real-live doll. She does a great song, too. The lovely, vivacious, willowy blonde ...
Jerry: You mean Skitch Henderson?
Bing: No, Colonna. [Audience laughter.] I mean a gal whose special brand of vocalizing is making jukeboxes jump from Jackson Heights to Jasper Park: Miss Peggy Lee. [Audience applause.]
Peggy: Thanks, Bing.
Bing: You gotta a song for us, Peg?
Peggy: Well, I'd like to do Linger In My Arms A Little Longer, Baby.
Bing: Hmm. I'll stand close by in case you need a lingerer, hmm?
After she finishes the rendition, and as the audience applauds, Crosby remarks: "very sultry, Peggy. Très romantique." (He places a Latin-styled emphasis on the first letter of the adjective romantique.)

2. Santa Claus Sketch
In the episode's sketch, Bing Crosby plays Santa Claus and Peggy Lee plays mother to Jerry Colonna's lecherous character. The Colonna character (a child who paradoxically is fully grown and already shaving) wishes Santa to bestow on him "presents of the comely variety."

3. Preamble To "It's A Good Day"
Bing: ... I'd like to have another word with Peggy Lee.
Peggy: Right here, Bing.
Bing: Peggy, I heard one of your new tunes, from the record, the other day. One you wrote. I'd like to learn it.
Peggy: Which one was that, Bing?
Bing: I think it's called It's A Good Day.
Peggy: Oh, yes. Well, why don't you run through it with me right now?
Bing: Sure beats ?scratching [?grazing] by myself. You'll catch me if I slip, will you, moll?
Peggy: Alright; hang on tight.
Bing: Here we go.


Date: December 18, 1946 (Brdcst Date)(Pre-recorded 11/30 & 12/02)
Location: Hollywood, California
Label: Philco Radio Time Starring Bing Crosby (1st Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Dave Barbour (g), Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) It's All Over Now - 2:35(Don Marcotte, Sunny Skylar)
Castle Communications Licensed CS/CD(United Kingdom) Mat Mc/Cd 316 — Let There Be Love; The Best Of Peggy Lee   (1994)
Hughes Leisure Group Public Domain CD(Australia/New Zealand) Stb 8849 — Peggy Lee ("20 Golden Greats / Starburst" Series)    (1994)
Castle Communications' Kaz Division Licensed CS/CD(United Kingdom) Trt Mc/Cd Cd 153 — Let There Be Love (TrueTrax Sub-Label)   (1995)
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) Everything's Movin' Too Fast - 2:15(Peggy Lee, Dave Barbour)
Both titles on:
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 10 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1946)
US Government's Veterans Administration 16" Transcription DiscProgram No. 34 — Here's To Veterans [Bing Crosby]    (1946)
Parrot Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Parcd 001 — It's A Good Day {Bing Crosby And Peggy Lee}   (1992)
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 624 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby With Ella Fitzgerald And Peggy Lee, Featuring Fred Astaire   (1997)
HLC CDHlc 6649 — [Bing Crosby] On The Air; Bing Crosby & Peggy Lee   (2000)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 153 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   






Photos

It Had to Be Big for Bing, or else: our mensch, pretending to huff and puff from a briar made only for giants such as he himself (ca. 1946) and receiving the oversized key to his Spokane hometown (1937). As published in the July 1946 issue of Pipe Lovers, the first photo was accompanied by an explanatory caption. Crosby is going along with a gag perpetrated by someone who had replaced his actual briar with this proboscis of a pipe. In the accompanying article, written by the crooner himself, he tells us that his preference is for a light-weight briar with straight stem and medium-sized bowl. The Scottish-English-Irish-American star adds that he favors "rough-cut and mildly aromatic" but "not too strong and harsh" tobacco brands, preferably from English, Irish or American origin As for his smoking quirks, El Bingo confesses to keeping a "sliced apple in [his] tobacco humidor so that the tobacco will remain moist and flavored," and to "dip [his] finger in a jar of honey whenever [he] breaks a new pipe." (These photographic images are part of what I'm calling The Smokin' Hot Piper series, already introduced in the notes to a preceding session.)


Schedule

According to Crosby chronicler Malcolm Macfarlane, this episode was rehearsed (2:45-3:30 p.m.) and transcribed (6:30-8:23 p.m.) on Monday, December 2. For his part, Crosby radio authority Lionel Pairpoint lists not one but two days of recording activity (November the 30th and December the 2nd, as shown above).


Personnel

1. Guests
There are no guests in this episode. Peggy Lee's name is announced as part of the cast: "This is Ken Carpenter welcoming you to Philco Radio Time, produced and transcribed in Hollywood with John Scott Trotter, His Chorus And Orchestra, Skitch Henderson, The Charioteers, Peggy Lee, and here's our goldenboy trush himself, Bing Crosby."

2. Solos And Duets
"It's All Over Now" is a Peggy Lee solo performance. "Everything's Moving Too Fast" is performed as a Crosby-Lee duet.

3. Dave Barbour
After Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee's duet rendition of "Everything's Moving Too Fast" is over, Crosby makes the following acknowledgment: "Oh yes, sir, everything is moving, uh, muy rápido. And I would like to point out that Dave Barbour threw out in some fine [?hot] guitar behind us."


Patter And Songs

1. Introduction Of Peggy Lee And Preamble To "It's All Over Now"
Bing: The happy task at hand just now is to present Peggy Lee. Peggy was here last week and those of you who heard her will understand why she is a definite must for this week.
Peggy: Well, thank you, Mr. C. You seem to be in an expansive holiday mood this eve.
Bing: Oh, I'm jolly, Peg, jolly. Got my Christmas shopping all done.
Peggy: Um-hmm.
Bing: Bought the kids just want they wanted, you know. A herd of sheep.
Peggy: [Chuckles.] Well, what did your boys want with a herd of sheep?
Bing: Oh, they'll take anything to get out of mowing the lawn! [Audience laughter.]
Peggy: Gee, Bing. I just can't believe that you are the father of four boys.
Bing: Well, as they say in The Red Skelton Show, now medical science offers proof positive ... [Audience laughter] ... which brings us to your first musical offering. What'll it be?
Peggy: It's All Over Now.
Bing: Oh, this I know will be great.
After Peggy Lee's rendition, and as the audience applauds, Crosby adds: "oh, lovely. That was grand, Peg."

2. Preamble To "Everything's Moving Too Fast"
Bing: To those of you who are not accustomed to peering at the credits on sheet music, we'd like to remind you that Miss Peggy Lee not only has sung the songs through the mike. She's also put quite a few of them down on paper, along with Dave Barbour. Tonight they've come with a new one, recently titled -- uh -- I believe its in your script there, Peggy. Wh- what's the name of it?
Peggy: Yes, uh, Everything's Moving Too Fast.
Bing: Well, let's sing it together. I'll slow up for you a little.
Peggy: Heh. [Audience laughter.]
Peggy: Ha, okay Bing, let's take some, and leave some.
Bing: Yes, ma'am.


Date: January 1, 1947 (Broadcast Date)(Pre-recorded 12/14 & 12/16)
Location: Studio B, NBC West Coast Radio City, Hollywood, California
Label: Philco Radio Time Starring Bing Crosby (1st Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Richard P. Clark, Morton B. Friedman, Joseph "Joe" Krechter, John "Jack" Mayhew, George Moore (r), Robert "Bobby" Guy, Uan Rasey (t), William "Bill" Atkinson, Peter Beilmann, Wendell "Gus" Mayhew (tb), Arthur Frantz (frh), Loring "Red" Nichols (c), Perry Botkin, Jr. (g), Edwin "Buddy" Cole (p), Ann Mason (hrp), John Cyr (d), Harry Bluestone aka Blostein, Samuel "Sam" Freed, Jr, Harold Haybert, Henry Hill, Larry Kurkdjie, Bill Miller, Mischa Russell, Olcott Vail (vn), Meyer Bello, Leo Fleitman (vl), Cy Bernard, Karl Rossner (vc), Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) He's Just My Kind - 2:56(Floyd Huddleston, Mark McIntyre)
Castle Communications Licensed CS/CD(United Kingdom) Mat Mc/Cd 316 — Let There Be Love; The Best Of Peggy Lee   (1994)
Hughes Leisure Group Public Domain CD(Australia/New Zealand) Stb 8849 — Peggy Lee ("20 Golden Greats / Starburst" Series)    (1994)
Castle Communications' Kaz Division Licensed CS/CD(United Kingdom) Trt Mc/Cd Cd 153 — Let There Be Love (TrueTrax Sub-Label)   (1995)
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) Baby, You Can Count On Me - 2:46(Freddie Stewart)
Magic/Submarine Collectors' Label CS/LP(United Kingdom) Awe 10 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby & Friends, Volume II   (1984)
Delta's LaserLight Digital Licensed CD12642 — Miss Peggy Lee ("More Of The Best" Series)   (1996)
Magic/Submarine Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Dawe 3; also Dsoy 752 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby & Friends ("Sounds Of Yesteryear" Series)   (2008)
JGB Limited Edition Club Collectors' Label LPJgb 1005 — [Bing Crosby] Slightly Latin   
Both titles on:
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 12 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1946)
Parrot Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Parcd 001 — It's A Good Day {Bing Crosby And Peggy Lee}   (1992)
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 624 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby With Ella Fitzgerald And Peggy Lee, Featuring Fred Astaire   (1997)
Avid Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Avc 876 — Peggy Lee ("The Essential Collection" Series)    (2007)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 2133 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   






Photos

First image: the show's songbird, Peggy Lee, with the show's bandleader, John Scott Trotter (standing) and the episode's guest star, Joe Frisco. Despite the confluence of three of the participants of this 1947 installment, the photo was actually taken on the previous year, at a rehearsal for the show's May 2, 1946 broadcast, which had also counted with Frisco and Lee as guests .

Rest of the images: episodes such as the one under discussion were recorded onto transcription discs prepared by Bing Crosby Enterprises and the networks (ABC, in this case) for the show's sponsor (Philco, in this instance) to distribute them among participating radio stations. As invariably shown on the label of the discs, the stations were required to play the episode within a short period of time, the last stipulated day naturally preceding the first day for which the next episode was scheduled. These discs were most frequently 16" in diameter, and made of vinyl. They could hold nearly 15 minutes of programming per side, thereby making it necessary to use two sides at a minimum. The photos on display show this particular episode as having been recorded over not one but two single-sided discs (last image). This distribution of the contents over different disc sides probably eased the work of station engineers and announcers, during the airplay over the radio airwaves. (A preference for distribution over three sides is not uncommon, either.) Note that, rather than being left blank, the sides without episode content were designated to test the quality of the playback needle in use at the given station (fourth image above). See also photography under the broadcast dated May 11, 1949.


Schedule

According to Crosby chronicler Malcolm Macfarlane, this episode was rehearsed (12:30–2:15 p.m) and transcribed (3:50–5:50 p.m.) on Monday, December 16. For his part, Crosby radio authority Lionel Pairpoint lists not one but two days of recording activity (the 14th and the 16th, as shown above).


Personnel

1. Guest
Joe Frisco was the episode's guest. As in the previous show, Peggy Lee was billed as part of the show's cast, and she was again announced last, right before the identification of the guest. This billing pattern remains in place for the next episodes in which Lee appears. She is also among the various cast members who, at the start of this episode, exchange "happy new year" greetings with Bing Crosby.

2. Musicians
The above-listed personnel includes all the musicians that performed in this episode. Since it is a collective personnel, the claim that all of them were heard behind Lee should be deemed tentative at best. My source for this personnel is The Red Nichols Story: After Intermission, 1942-1965, written by Philip R. Evans, Stanley Hester, Stephen Hester, and Linda Evans. No bassist is listed.

3. Solos And Duets
Peggy Lee performed "Baby, You Can Count On Me" as a duet with Bing Crosby. "He's Just My Kind" was Lee's solo performance. She would reprise the solo a few weeks later (February 12, 1947).


Patter And Songs

1. Introduction To Peggy Lee's Solo
Bing: It's Miss Peggy Lee, our sensational song stylist. What are you going to tantalizing us with tonight, Peg?
Peggy: Well, I'd like to sing He's Just My Kind.
Bing: It'd just be très [unintelligible French adjective].

2. Introduction To The Crosby-Lee Duet
Bing: And now it's encore time for Peggy Lee. She's going to sing one of her current record successes, Baby, You Can Count On Me.
Peggy: Oh-aah, I thought you were going to sing Baby with me, baby.
Bing: Of course, what am I thinking of. I'm packing a small New Year's Day neurosis here, I guess. You start, don't you, Peg?



Date: January 8, 1947 (Broadcast Date)(Pre-recorded 12/22)
Location: Studio B, NBC West Coast Radio City, Hollywood, California
Label: Philco Radio Time Starring Bing Crosby (1st Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) What More Can A Woman Do - 3:02(Peggy Lee, Dave Barbour)
Parrot Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Parcd 001 — It's A Good Day {Bing Crosby And Peggy Lee}   (1992)
President Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Plcd 550 — Listen To The Magic    (1996)
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 624 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby With Ella Fitzgerald And Peggy Lee, Featuring Fred Astaire   (1997)
Castle Pie Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Piesd 045 — Mañana    (1999)
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) It's A Good Day - 2:48(Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee)
Both titles on:
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 13 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1946)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 154 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   





Photos

The Smokin' Hot Piper Series, continued. (Part III.) Amidst the myriad of commercial products which were promoted by Bing (or rather, by his image), a pipe brand could not possibly be missing, of course. Daddy Crosby's Mastercraft Pipe campaign was in full force during the mid-1940s.


Schedule

Crosby radio authority Lionel Pairpoint does not specify on which days this episode was taped. For his part, Crosby chronicler Malcolm Macfarlane states that it was rehearsed (10:00–11:30 a.m.) and transcribed (1:38–3:38 p.m.) on Sunday, December 22.


Personnel

1. Guest
This episode's guest was Mickey Rooney.

2. Solos And Duets
"What More Can A Woman Do" is a Peggy Lee solo performance; she shares vocal duties with Bing Crosby on "It's A Good Day." Apparently a favorite duet of theirs, "It's A Good Day" was jointly sung by Lee and Crosby in four different episodes (December 11, 1946, January 8, 1947; March 19, 1947; April 23, 1947). Besides the likelihood that the pair of vocalists enjoyed singing it together, the recurrence of the hit song in the show was probably due to its popularity at the time. Crosby also sang a solo rendition during an episode broadcast on June 19, 1947.


Patter And Songs

1. Preamble To Peggy Lee's Solo
Bing: And now my lipped lips flutter as a lovely vision appears on the opposite side of this very mike. I'm quite sure it's Miss Peggy Lee.
Peggy: Hi, Bing; is that you around there?
Bing: Yeah; is that you, Peg?
Peggy: Umhmm.
Bing: What are you gonna sing for us?
Peggy: What More Can A Woman Do.
Bing: Yes, you and Dave Barbour did a nice job writing there, Peggy, on that song. As usual, I'm sure we can expect a lovely rendition by you as well.
Peggy: Thank you; I'll do my best.
Bing: Well, I don't know what more a man can ask for.
After Lee's rendition ends, and as the audience effusively applauds, Bing adds: "I loved it, Peggy. I loved every measure of it. Thank you."

2. Preamble To The Crosby-Lee Duet
The episode's script calls for the young Mickey Rooney to play an aspiring songwriter -- an over-eager and opportunistic one. Hence Rooney's songwriting skills become the main topic of conversation between the young guest and the Old Groaner. The conversation culminates in Rooney's successful attempt at having Crosby sing one of his songs. Right after the number is over, Peggy Lee is re-introduced.
Bing: Peggy Lee now returns and I hope to join her in a song called It's A Good Day.
Mickey: Weell. Hi, Peg.
Peggy: Hi, Mickey.
Mickey: Say, Peggy, you got a minute? Look. I got a little tune here I'd like to talk to you about. It's a small...
Bing (interrupting): Please, Mickey. Just -- listen, we've got to do a little work here. Should we take off, Peggy?
Mickey: Sorry, sorry.
Bing: Cue partner.


Date: February 5, 1947 (Broadcast Date) (Pre-recorded 1/20 & 1/21)
Location: Studio B, NBC West Coast Radio City, Hollywood, California
Label: Philco Radio Time Starring Bing Crosby (1st Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Dave Barbour (g), Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) It's Lovin' Time - 2:55(Harry Harris, J. Chalmers "Chummy" MacGregor)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 17 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1947)
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 549 — I've Got A Crush On You   (1995)
Avid Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Avc 876 — Peggy Lee ("The Essential Collection" Series)    (2007)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 2134 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   





Photos

The Smokin' Hot Piper Series, continued. Part IV.


Schedule

According to Crosby chronicler Malcolm Macfarlane, this episode was rehearsed (2:15–2:45 p.m., 6:00–6:53 p.m.) and transcribed (2:45–4:15 p.m., 6:53–7:29 p.m.) on Tuesday, January 21. For his part, Crosby radio authority Lionel Pairpoint lists not one but two days of recording activity (the 20th and the 21st, as shown above).

I am not clear about the logic behind the scheduling of two transcription sessions for this episode -- and ditto for many subsequent episodes. Was it performed and recorded in two separate parts? Or was it recorded twice, in the entirety? A third and, to me, likelier possibility is that the 2:45–4:15 p.m. timing was the actual performance period, captured on Magnetophon tape machines, while the 6:53–7:29 p.m. timing would have been mostly a non-performative, engineering period, dedicated to the transfer of the tapes onto transcription discs. That second process was being conducted due to ABC's stipulations. The network was not yet fully confident on the reliability of the machine and the efficacy of the taping process. It would not be until April of the next year that ABC's confidence grew substantially., thanks to the arrival of new Ampex machines.)


Songs

1. Solos And Duets
"It's Lovin' Time" is a Peggy Lee solo. This episode features no duet with Crosby.


Personnel

1. Guest
This episode's guest is Beatrice Lillie. She does not interact with Lee. (Above, under the Schedule sub-section, I mentioned that the episode appears to have been recorded in two sittings, separated by about three hours. Perhaps Lillie was present for only one of the sittings, and Lee was present only for the sitting from which Lillie was absent.)

2. Peggy Lee
Peggy Lee continues to be listed as part of the cast, not as a guest. She does her singing spot before Lillie is introduced.

3. Dave Barbour
The source for the credit to Dave Barbour on guitar is an acknowledgment made by Bing Crosby's during the episode.


Patter

2. Philco Commercial
1. Preamble To "It's Lovin' Time"
In this episode, announcer Ken Carpenter's commercial pitch on Philco's behalf starts with commentary about how bulky radios used to be. Peggy Lee is introduced in the middle of the pitch.
Ken: Here's one portable that's really light and compact.
Bing: Oh, something along my lines -- slender and svelte.
Ken: Well .... Uh ... I don't know. If you don't mind, Bing, I'd rather compare the Philco portable with Peggy Lee's lines.
Bing: Oh, you are positively psychic, Kenneth, because here comes Peggy Lee right now. Hi, Peg. You had a nice vacation up in Las Vegas?
Peggy: Yeah. Could I sing my song right now?
Bing: What's your hurry?
Peggy (tongue in cheek): I need the money!
...
Bing: Oh say, Peggy. I want to congratulate you on winning the Downbeat poll for the Most Popular Girl Singer
Peggy: Oh, thank you.
... [Carpenter finally makes his pitch.] ...
Bing: Peggy Lee returns from a smashing engagement in Las Vegas to sing It's Lovin' Time, by J. Chalmers MacGregor.
After Lee finishes singing, Crosby adds, "thank you, Peggy, that was lovely. Dave Barbour came on really good with that guitar, too."


Date: February 12, 1947 (Broadcst Date) (Pre-recorded 1/27 & 1/28)
Location: Studio B, NBC West Coast Radio City, Hollywood, California
Label: Philco Radio Time Starring Bing Crosby (1st Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) He's Just My Kind - 3:04(Floyd Huddleston, Mark McIntyre)
BMG MUSIC PUBLISHING CD[promo] Pub 016 PEGGY LEE: SONGWRITER   (2001)
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) The Best Man - 2:04(Roy Alfred, Fred Wise)
Both titles on:
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 18 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1947)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 2135 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   





Photo

Peggy Lee with Groucho Marx, in a shot taken during the rehearsals that preceded the recording of this episode (on January 27 and 28, 1947). The first version of the photo is actually part of a publicity kit, probably sent out to radio stations, which would in turn be expected to make the kit's contents available to the local press.


Schedule

According to Crosby chronicler Malcolm Macfarlane, this episode was rehearsed (2:25–2:45 p.m., 6:20–6:47 p.m.) and transcribed (2:45–4:15 p.m., 6:47–7:17 p.m. on Tuesday, January 28. As indicated above, Crosby radio authority Lionel Pairpoint lists not one but two days of recording activity, the 27th and the 28th.


Personnel

1. Guest
Groucho Marx guests on this episode. The very popular comedian is heard almost all the way through the episode -- i.e., more extensively than most other guests. Peggy Lee is listed as part of the show's cast.

2. Solos And Duets
"He's Just My Kind" is a Peggy Lee solo, "The Best Man" a duet with Bing Crosby. The solo had also been sung in a previous episode (January 1, 1947). The duet would be reprised in the next broadcast to feature Lee (March 12, 1947).


Songs

1. "The Best Man"
A brief coda, honoring John Scott Trotter, is sung by Crosby and Lee: "Could it be Trotter? Because he is the best man, the best man in the end."


Issues

1. Peggy Lee: Songwriter
Slated to feature only numbers (co-)written by Peggy Lee, this promotional BMG Music Publishing CD includes the song "He's Just My Kind" under the erroneous assumption that she wrote it. Thus the CD wrongly credits the composition to Dave Barbour and Peggy Lee. Furthermore, the audio of "He's just My Kind" on this CD has applause at its end. Peggy Lee's Capitol master does not. The applause is a probable indication of a radio source. We appear to be listening to the song as it was featured on The Bing Crosby Show, where it was indeed followed by applause. (The audio from Crosby's show sounds identical to the Capitol master, with the applause as the only easily discernible difference. It might be that, rather than having Lee sing the song on this episode, the producers of the radio show opted for playing the Capitol master instead -- released at the time on a 78 single.


Patter

1. Philco Commercial
2. Preamble To "He's Just My Kind"
After Bing Crosby finishes one of his solos, Ken Carpenter uses Peggy Lee's interpretation of "He's Just My Kind" as a pretext to promote Philco portable radios.
Ken: Well, that was very good, jolly. Very nice, but I -- I do wish that Peggy Lee would sing her number.
Bing: Why, is Peggy singing something about Philco?
Ken: Well, no, but the title of her tune is It's Just My Kind. That certainly applies to Philco radios and Philco radio phonographs.
Bing: There we go again.
Ken: They are everybody's kind.
Bing: I don't know of any tune called It's Just My Kind. Eh ... Peggy.
Peggy: Yes, Bing?
Bing: What are you singing tonight?
Peggy: He's Just My Kind.
Ken: He's Just My Kind. Gee, I wish it was It's instead of He's.
Bing: Ken, you will just have to talk about boy radio tonight.
Ken: Okay, i'll just do that: boy oh boy, what a powerhouse the new Philco portable is.
Bing: Miss Peggy Lee will now sing "He's Just My Kind."
Ken: Just a minute, please. On second thought, Bing, I object to that boy radio stuff. When I think a little portable radio gets you stations that are hard to tune in even big sets, I feel like blowing my top.
Bing: For heavens sake, wait till you wait home.
Ken: Anyway, it's a husky he-man portable radio, rugged enough to stand plenty of traveling ... [Carpenter continues with his pitch at length.] ... Call it a boy radio; I call it the giant of portables. And it's a Philco, famous for quality the world over.
Bing: What a brave man. I like you.

2. Segueway From "He's Just My Kind" To The Comic Patter
Bing: That was fine, Peggy. Mighty sweet.
Peggy: Thanks Bing.
Bing: Oh, it's nothing. I'd say that to any deserving kid. And if I might add, you are not only deserving, but also a very beautiful creature.
Groucho: Yes, she is a very beautiful creature, and a not a bad looking woman, either.
Bing: Well, if it isn't Groucho the-fun-loving Mark.
The audience applauds, and the two men move on to exchanging lines, without Lee's involvement.


The Case Of The False Totem

Date: February 19, 1947 (Broadcast Date)
Location: Hollywood, California
Label: Philco Radio Time Starring Bing Crosby (1st Season)





The above-shown album was issued on the Canadian label Totem, under catalogue number 1002. This album contains two episodes of the Crosby show, one broadcast on October 16, 1946, the other on February 19, 1947. Neither features Peggy Lee.

Online, several music sites wrongly list Peggy Lee among the artists heard on Bing Is Back!. The mistake stems from the fact that Peggy Lee's name is listed on the back cover, which reproduces an ad for the February 19, 1947 broadcast. Most likely, the ad made mention of Lee on account of her status as a (semi-)regular performer in the program. The actual guests were instead Judy Garland, Leo McCarey, and William Frawley; they took over the guest spots and duet performances.


Date: March 12, 1947 (Broadcast Date) (Pre-recorded 2/08 or 2/25)
Location: Studio B, NBC West Coast Radio City, Hollywood, California
Label: Philco Radio Time Starring Bing Crosby (1st Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) Happiness Is A Thing Called Joe - 3:21(Erwin 'Yip' Harburg, Harold Arlen)
Demand Performance Collectors' Label cassetteDpc 707 — The Unforgettable Peggy Lee   (1985)
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 549 — I've Got A Crush On You   (1995)
Avid Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Avc 876 — Peggy Lee ("The Essential Collection" Series)    (2007)
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) The Best Man - 2:06(Roy Alfred, Fred Wise)
Parrot Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Parcd 001 — It's A Good Day {Bing Crosby And Peggy Lee}   (1992)
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 624 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby With Ella Fitzgerald And Peggy Lee, Featuring Fred Astaire   (1997)
Both titles on:
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 22 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1947)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 336 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   






Photos

The Smokin' Hot Piper Series, continued. Part V.


Schedule

According to Crosby chronicler Malcolm Macfarlane, this episode was rehearsed (1:30–3:15 p.m.) and transcribed (5:20–7:30 p.m.) on Tuesday, February 25. For his part, Crosby radio authority Lionel Pairpoint lists a different, much earlier day of recording activity (February the 8th).


Personnel

1. Guests
2. The Ernie Felice Quartet
3. Peggy Lee
No guests are announced in this episode, but The Ernie Felice Quartet is a new addition to the mix. Although this is their only appearance during the season, Ken Carpenter lists the quartet as if it were part of the cast: "The Charioteers, Skitch Henderson, Peggy Lee and the Ernie Felice Quartet."

This episode is actually packed with music (as Bing declares at the outset) and relatively low on patter. The aforementioned acts are granted one solo each. Peggy Lee is also given a somewhat bigger speaking role than usual.

At the end of the program, the customary announcement of the next week's guest takes an usual turn. Ken Carpenter states that "at this moment" the guest's identity "is shrouded in mystery." Apparently, nobody had been securely booked yet.

2. Solos and Duets
For her solo, Peggy Lee sings "Happiness Is A Thing Called Joe." As for "The Best Man," the Lee-Crosby duet, it had already been heard one month earlier in the show, during the previous episode to feature the songstress (February 12, 1947).


Patter

1. Preamble And Postscript To "Happiness Is A Thing Called Joe"
As music plays in the background, Bing Crosby makes the following comment.
Bing: Oh my. Such moody music could only presage the return to the Philco fold of Miss Peggy Lee. What are they building up to there, Peggy?
Peggy: Well that's Happiness Is A Thing Called Joe, Bing.
Bing: Well I'm all ears, and I'm only half kidding.
After Lee finishes the song, and as applause is heard, Bing speaks again.
Bing: Grand, Peggy, and thank you. But don't run away; I have important business with you here a little later.
Peggy: You mean you are going to give me my paycheck?
Bing: No, [Peggy is heard chuckling]; I thought we could sing a little song together.
Peggy: Oh, gee, that's better than money any day.
Bing: Hmm, Peggy if you only meant that.
Peggy: Oh, I do, Bing, I do.
Bing: Well, things are beginning to break for me. Peggy doesn't want to get paid and Hank Greenberg signed with The Pirates! Everything ... [The audience's applause seems to interrupt him, and what sounds like an abrupt edit follows. The rest of Crosby's comment is cut and the audience's applause suddenly stops. The crooner is then heard introducing The Ernie Felice Quartet.]

2. Preamble To "The Best Man"
Bing: And now, right on cue and standing mike-side with me is Peggy Lee with all her loveliness.
Peggy: Well, thanks, Bing; I appreciate what you say.
Bing: I appreciate what I see. [Quick chuckle from Peggy, the audience, and Bing himself.] Peg, we did a tune together some time ago called "Best Man." Two or three people told me it went rather well.
Peggy: Oh. Well, do you think we should do it again?
Bing: I think it's destiny.
[Peggy chuckles.]


Date: March 19, 1947 (Broadcast Date) (Pre-recorded 3/03 & 3/04)
Location: Studio B, NBC West Coast Radio City, Hollywood, California
Label: Philco Radio Time Starring Bing Crosby (1st Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) It's A Good Day - 1:42(Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee)
Parrot Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Parcd 001 — It's A Good Day {Bing Crosby And Peggy Lee}   (1992)
Delta's LaserLight Digital Licensed CD12641 — Miss Peggy Lee ("Some Of The Best" Series)   (1996)
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 624 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby With Ella Fitzgerald And Peggy Lee, Featuring Fred Astaire   (1997)
Red Line Public Domain CD(Italy) Cd 4527 2 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby And Friends ("The Timeless Collection" Series)    (2004)
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) Just Squeeze Me - 2:23(Duke Ellington, Lee Gaines)
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 549 — I've Got A Crush On You   (1995)
Avid Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Avc 876 — Peggy Lee ("The Essential Collection" Series)    (2007)
Both titles on:
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription Disc109 — Bing Crosby   (1947)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 23 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1947)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 337 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   





Photos

The Smokin' Hot Piper Series, continued. Part VI.


Schedule

According to Crosby chronicler Malcolm Macfarlane, this episode was transcribed (2:15–4:15 p.m., 6:59–7:34 p.m.) on Tuesday, March 4.

Crosby radio authority Lionel Pairpoint lists two consecutive days of recording or transcription activity, March the 3rd and the 4th. For his part, MacFarlane states that March 3 was the day on which Crosby rehearsed and recorded a different episode: the one broadcast on April the 3rd, which featured Al Jolson but not Peggy Lee.

Neither expert makes mention of a rehearsal for this March 19 episode.


Personnel

1. Guest
Danny Kaye, this episode's guest, does not interact with Peggy Lee during the broadcast.

2. Solos And Duets
"Just Squeeze Me" is a Peggy Lee solo vocal performance. "It's A Good Day" apparently was a favorite Lee and Crosby duet. They performed it in four episodes (December 11, 1946, January 8, 1947; March 19, 1947; April 23, 1947) -- more than any other number. A solo rendition of Lee's self-penned his was also sung by Crosby during an episode broadcast on June 19, 1947.

3. The Charioteers
This broadcast marks the vocal group's last regular appearance on the show.


Patter

1. Preamble To "Squeeze Me (But Please Don't Tease Me)"
Bing: And here's Peggy Lee. What's the tune tonight, Peg?
Peggy: Squeeze Me, But Please Don't Tease Me.
Bing: Very interesting thoughts in there. I'll work it out.
After Lee finishes the song, and as the audience applauds, Bing compliments her: "very nice, Peggy. Wonderful."

2. Preamble To "It's A Good Day"
Bing: And now, Peggy Lee, congratulations on yours and Dave Barbour's tune Good Day [sic]. It's right up there with the leaders.
Peggy: Oh, well, shall we sing it?
Bing: Well, I think it's a must.


Date: March 26, 1947 (Broadcast Date) (Pre-recorded 03/11)
Location: Studio B, NBC West Coast Radio City, Hollywood, California
Label: Philco Radio Time Starring Bing Crosby (1st Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) For Sentimental Reasons - 2:42(William "Pat" Best, Ivory "Deek" Watson)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 24 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1947)
Bernard Fox's American Retrospectives Collectors' Label LPMf 207 5 (419-422) — [Bing Crosby] The Greatest Radio Broadcasts   (1978)
Black Lion Collectors' Label LPBlm 52033 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby With Peggy Lee, Jack Benny And Gary Cooper   (1983)





Photos

Taken at NBC's Studio B on March 11 (the day in which this episode was rehearsed and transcribed), here is a shot of Philco Radio Time castmembers Peggy Lee and Skitch Henderson with guests Jack Benny and Mary Livingstone.


Schedule

According to Crosby chronicler Malcolm Macfarlane, this episode was rehearsed transcribed on Wednesday, March 26 (9:00–9:30 p.m.). Crosby radio authority Lionel Pairpoint also identifies the 11th as the day of recording activity. Neither authority makes mention of rehearsal activity.





Personnel

1. Guests
Guests Jack Benny and Mary Livingstone (Mrs. Benny) do not interact with Peggy Lee on the broadcast, but the attached photo seems to show them in the act of rehearsing a number together. (In a reciprocal arrangement, Bing Crosby had guested on Jack Benny's show on March 16.)

2. Skitch Henderson
This broadcast marks the pianist's last regular appearance on the show.


Patter

1. Preface To "For Sentimental Reasons"
Bing: Peggy Lee is here to sing and for a very definite reason -- eh, Peggy?
Peggy: Yep, For Sentimental Reasons.
Bing: Well, it worked out just like we [?thought of it {unintelligible}] and planned it.
After the number is over, Crosby adds: "that was very sweet, Peggy. Very sweet, indeed."


Date: April 9, 1947 (Broadcast Date) (Pre-recorded 03/17)
Location: Studio B, NBC West Coast Radio City, Hollywood, California
Label: Philco Radio Time Starring Bing Crosby (1st Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Loring "Red" Nichols (c), Alec Templeton (p, v), Ken Carpenter, Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) Speaking Of Angels - 3:18(Bennie Benjamin, George David Weiss)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 26 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1947)
Demand Performance Collectors' Label cassetteDpc 707 — The Unforgettable Peggy Lee   (1985)
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 549 — I've Got A Crush On You   (1995)
Avid Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Avc 876 — Peggy Lee ("The Essential Collection" Series)    (2007)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 338 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) [Musical Commercial] Mr. Crosby And Mr. Templeton For Philco - 2:55(Alec Templeton)
unissued






Photos

The Smokin' Hot Piper Series, continued. Part VII.


Schedule

According to Crosby chronicler Malcolm Macfarlane, this episode was rehearsed (1:30–1:45 p.m.) and transcribed on (1:45–3:45 p.m., 5:45–6:45 p.m.) on Monday, March 17. Crosby radio authority Lionel Pairpoint also identifies the 17th as the recording day. Neither expert makes mention of rehearsal activity.


Personnel

1. Guest
Guest Alec Templeton interacts with Peggy Lee solely during the episode's variation on the customary Philco commercial.

2. Red Nichols
Bing Crosby credits Red Nichols with the prominent cornet backing heard during Peggy Lee's solo vocal. (Nichols was one of the series' regular musicians. Like other regular players, he was acknowleged and singled out only when he performed an attention-grabbing solo or had a notable role in a given interpretation.)


Songs

1. Solos And Duets
"Speaking of Angels" is a Peggy Lee solo performance. In this episode, she does not sing any duets with Crosby.

2. "Mr. Crosby And Mr. Templeton For Philco"
Written by guest Alec Templeton himself, this particular iteration of the show's customary promotional commercial is actually a parody, intentionally borrowing from songs of the day. It also features Templeton on piano. The bulk of the lines are sung by Bing Crosby and Alec Templeton. Peggy Lee sings merely two lines, one of them by herself ("Philco for me, says Peggy Lee") and the other in unison with the men. Ken Carpenter sings a line or two, too. I should also clarify that the above-shown title for this jingle is entirely my own invention (though based on my listening of the lyrics, of course). The sources at hand offer no particular title for it, other than the generic appellation "Philco Commercial."


Patter

1. Preamble To "Speaking Of Angels"
Bing: Peggy Lee takes over now. And the title of your tune is Speaking Of Angels, right, Peg?
Peggy: Right, angel.
Bing: Well, pardon me while I pull up a cloud. I got a little pink ?job I keep ?hanging for just such occasions. I wanna listen attentively to every ?measure.
After Lee finishes, and as the audience applauds, Crosby adds: "Lovely, Miss Lee, lovely."


Date: April 16, 1947 (Broadcast Date) (Pre-recorded 3/24)
Location: Studio B, NBC West Coast Radio City, Hollywood, California
Label: Philco Radio Time Starring Bing Crosby (1st Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) A Nightingale Can Sing The Blues - 3:12(Dick Charles, Lawrence W. Markes, Jr.)
President Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Plcd 550 — Listen To The Magic    (1996)
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) I Still Suits Me - 3:15(Oscar Hammerstein II, Jerome Kern)
Magic/Submarine Collectors' Label CS/LP(United Kingdom) Awe 10 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby & Friends, Volume II   (1984)
Magic/Submarine Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Dawe 3; also Dsoy 752 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby & Friends ("Sounds Of Yesteryear" Series)   (2008)
Both titles on:
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 27 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1947)
Parrot Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Parcd 001 — It's A Good Day {Bing Crosby And Peggy Lee}   (1992)
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 624 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby With Ella Fitzgerald And Peggy Lee, Featuring Fred Astaire   (1997)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 339 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   






Photos

The Smokin' Hot Piper Series, continued (part VIII). Top row: front cover of Movie Story magazine (June 1940 issue) and the publicity shot that inspired the cover. Bottom row: any place, any time, any attire -- pipe smoking for all occasions.


Schedule

According to Crosby chronicler Malcolm Macfarlane, this episode was rehearsed (2:30–1:15 p.m., 5:40–5:55 p.m.) and transcribed (1:15–3:15 p.m., 5:55–6:55 p.m.) on Monday, March 24. Crosby radio authority Lionel Pairpoint also identifies the 24th as the day of recording activity.


Personnel

1. Guest
Jimmy Durante is Bing Crosby's guest in this episode. On the matter of Peggy Lee's interaction with Durante, see below, under Patter.

2. Duets And Solos
"A Nightingale Can Sing The Blues" is Peggy Lee's solo spot. After performing only solos in her last two appearances, this broadcast returns Lee to the standard practice of sharing one song with Crosby ("I Still Suits Me").


Patter

1. Preamble To "A Nightingale Can Sing The Blues"
Bing: Here's a new tune. A Nightingale Can Sing The Blues. Should any student observer of bird lore be looking for action, I would lay you eight to five that no nightingale can sing it the way our own Peggy Lee does.
Peggy: Why, Mr. Crosby, how do you go on.
Bing: Well, I'm basically poetic, you know. [unintelligible remark; maybe "I admit it."]
Following Lee's rendition, while enthusiastic applause is heard, Crosby adds: "That is something, Peg, and eminently listenable."

2. Comic Dialogue
[Unfortunately, I am unable to clearly hear some of this dialogue's words. As a result, some portions of the banter among Crosby, Durante, and Lee might prove hard to grasp.]
Bing: Now if you move slightly to the ride, I'd like to present you to Peggy Lee.
Peggy: Hello, Jimmy
Jimmy: What a dish. How do you do, Miss Lee? I'd like to invite you over to my house some day for a swim.
Peggy: Oh, you have a swimming pool?
Jimmy: I have two pools. One's for ___.
Bing: Very stylish, Jimmy.
Jimmy: The other one's for my relatives.
Bing: Very chic, very stylish idea. And so are you, Peggy.
Jimmy: You are right, Bing. Well, if she'd get a crew haircut, I'd be would willing to forsake our ?remora.
Bing: It's a pickle, pickle.
Jimmy: What else can I be, what else can I be, the way they run me around that studio? What a day I had.
Bing: What transpired?
Jimmy: I spent a half an hour making love to Lana Turner, a half an hour making love to Greer Garson and half an hour making love to Rita Hayworth, then gave me half an hour for lunch and another half hour making love to Kathryn Grayson, and then another half an hour for lunch. I tell you it's a fantastic waste of time.
Bing: Waste of time?
Jimmy: Certainly! Who needs lunch?
Later on, Jimmy tells Bing about a "colossal" idea of his: Bing and Jimmy in a picture together. Jimmy will play the part of a "chicken filler" in a public market.
Peggy: You got a part for me, Mr. Durante?
Jimmy: Peggy, your part calls for a considerable amount of singing. Therefore, you'll have to undergo a bit of tutoring and I should be most happy to 'tooch' you.
Bing: Who ever said you were a singing teacher, Jimmy?
Jimmy: My good man, if you'd take time to see my latest Metro Goldwyn Meyer release It Happened In Brooklyn, starring Frank Sinatra, Peter Lawford, and Kathryn Grayson and an unidentified man who was visiting the set that day, you'd know that I'm a great singing teacher!
Bing: You are a teacher of voice? Who are some of your pupils?
Jimmy: Who are some of my pupils? Did you ever hear of John Charles Thomas?
Bing: Yeah!
Jimmy: Did you ever hear of Madame ?Golacucci?"
Bing: Yeah!"
Jimmy: Did you ever hear of Lawrence Melacure?
Bing: Yeah!
Jimmy: Did you ever hear of ?Izzo Prissouru?
[audience laughter]
Bing: Sure! I know all those singers.
Jimmy: Well, have them contact me. I need some business.

3. Preamble To "I Still Suits Me"
Jimmy: ... I notice you are singing better. You've got nothing to worry about if you stick with me.
Bing: But Jimmy, right now I'm supposed to sing a song with Peggy Lee.
Jimmy: Well, due to my deep profession for Peggy, I acquiesce.
Bing: Acquiesce?
Jimmy: Very seldom them writers can stick me!
Bing: There's a syllable item for you. You got it.
Jimmy: But I'll stand close by to whisper things in your ear.
Bing: Mine?
Jimmy: Don't be so conceited. Peggy's.


Date: April 23, 1947 (Broadcast Date) (Pre-recorded 3/21)
Location: Studio B, NBC West Coast Radio City, Hollywood, California
Label: Philco Radio Time Starring Bing Crosby (1st Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) I'll Close My Eyes - 2:32(Buddy Kaye, Billy Reid aka William Gordon Reid)
Parrot Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Parcd 001 — It's A Good Day {Bing Crosby And Peggy Lee}   (1992)
President Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Plcd 550 — Listen To The Magic    (1996)
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 624 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby With Ella Fitzgerald And Peggy Lee, Featuring Fred Astaire   (1997)
Castle Pie Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Piesd 045 — Mañana    (1999)
Ediciones Folio/Gyc Records Public Domain CDEfvj 029 (Spain) — Peggy Lee ("Vocal Jazz" Series)   (2001)
Castle Pulse (The Sanctuary Group's) Licensed CD(United Kingdom) Pbxcd 904 — Ladies Of Jazz {Peggy, Sarah, Ella, Billie}   (2005)
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) It's A Good Day - 3:00(Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee)
Both titles on:
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription Disc114 — Bing Crosby   (1947)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 28 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1947)
US Government's Veterans Administration 16" Transcription DiscNo. 1418 — Here's To Veterans [Bing Crosby]    (1947)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 339 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   






Photos

The Smokin' Hot Piper Series, continued. Part IX.


Schedule

According to Crosby chronicler Malcolm Macfarlane, this episode was transcribed ((2:00–4:00 p.m., 6:20–7:20 p.m.) on Friday, March 21. Crosby radio authority Lionel Pairpoint also identifies the 24th as the day of recording activity. Neither expert makes reference to a rehearsal.


Personnel

1. Guest
This episode's guests are Burl Ives and Les Paul. Neither is heard interacting with Peggy Lee.

2. Solos And Duets
"I'll Close My Eyes" is a Peggy Lee solo vocal. "It's A Good Day" is a duet with Crosby. Apparently a favorite duet of theirs, "It's A Good Day" was performed by Lee and Crosby in four different Philco episodes (December 11, 1946, January 8, 1947; March 19, 1947; April 23, 1947). Crosby also sang a solo rendition of the Lee hit during an episode broadcast on June 19, 1947.


Patter

1. Preamble To "I'll Close My Eyes"
Bing: Here's Peggy Lee who's gonna sing I'll Close My Eyes. You get your eyes closed, Peggy?
Peggy: All set, Bing.
Bing: Atta girl. Doesn't have to look at the paper. Sings good, too.
"Thank you, Peggy. Very pretty," says Bing after Lee ends, while the audience applauds vigorously.

2. Preamble To "It's A Good Day"
Bing: "Here's Peggy Lee's and Dave Barbour's hit tune "Good Day" [sic]. Peggy and I have done it before and we'd like to do it again. Right, Peg?"
Peggy: "Right, Mr. C.
Bing: "Yes, sir. We're gone."


Songs

1. "It's A Good Day"
This duet version of the Lee hit is sung in typical rhythmic manner by the groaner and the songstress. There are a couple of differences in approach though, First, the tempo is slightly lower than usual. Second, Crosby throws into the equation several euphoric interjections, to which Lee responds with an occasionally jocular undertone as she sings.


Date: May 7, 1947 (Broadcast Date) (Pre-recorded 3/31)
Location: possibly Studio B, NBC West Coast Radio City, Hollywood, California
Label: Philco Radio Time Starring Bing Crosby (1st Season)

Richard P. Clark, Murray Cohan, Nicholas "Nick" Dann, Morton B. Friedman, Joseph "Joe" Krechter (r), Donald "Don" Anderson, Uan Rasey (t), Peter Beilmann, Wendell "Gus" Mayhew, Elmer Smithers (tb), Loring "Red" Nichols (c), Perry Botkin, Jr. (g), Doc Whiting (sb), Charles LaVere (p), Helen Hutchinson (hrp), John Cyr (d), Walter Edelstein, Samuel "Sam" Freed, Jr, Henry Hill, Caesar S. Kersten, Sam Leichter, Mayer Oberman, Nick Pisani, Mischa Russell (vn), Allan Harshman, Gary White (vl), Fred Goerner, Arthur Kafton (vc), Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) Why Don't You Do Right? - 2:19(Joe McCoy)
unissued





Photos

Al Jolson, captured in close proximity to both Peggy Lee and Bing Crosby. I have no specific details about either image. I do suspect that the shot with Lee was taken on March 31, 1947, when the present episode was recorded. As for the other photo, it is actually one out of quite a few extant pictures featuring Crosby and Jolson together in a recording environment. Not having come across dates for any of these photos, I am hoping that knowledgeable fans of Crosby or Jolson can offer their expertise. I am aware of the fact that they got together for a Decca studio session on March 25, 1947. Since the record label used the photo above on some of its Crosby releases, there is reason to speculate that the image originates in that studio session. However, other possibilities can not be discarded by any means. To wit: each gentleman also guested more than once on the other man's radio show. See also the discussion under the February 11, 1948 broadcast, where a companion shots of Crosby and Jolson (plus Oscar Levant) can be found.


A Problematic, Tentative Entry

I have listened to various online audio transfers of this episode of Bing Crosby's show, which aired on May 7, 1947. The episode has also been commercially released on LP and CD. Furthermore, various reliable experts in Crosbyana have identified and detailed the contents of the episode in their respective works. In all of these sources, Al Jolson and Irving Berlin are heard or listed as guests. Peggy Lee is not listed or heard at all.

Nevertheless, a Lee vocal has been (mis?)identified as coming from this episode. It can be heard in YouTube. While a listening of the clip does not help us in ascertaining whether May 7 is or isn't the correct date, we can clearly hear that the vocal comes from one of Crosby's radio shows, because the opening patter features the crooner in a fashion typical of his programs.

And yet, none of my various sources lists Lee as ever singing "Why Don't You Do Right?" on a Crosby program. Hence I can only operate under the assumption that the provided May 7 date is somehow correct, despite the fact that the performance was nowhere to be heard during my audition of the episode.

If we are to assume that the YouTube clip's date is correct, we will need to have a plausible explanation for the discrepancies at hand. One possibility: the West coast broadcast for this particular episode could have featured a version slightly different from the East coast broadcast. One coast would have heard Lee sing, while the other would have not. (This is a possibility that does not appear to be highly likely, however. Because Crosby was already pre-recording his shows by this point in time, both coasts should have broadcast the same episode, as pre-recorded on disc.)

A simpler possibility would be that the songstress's number comes from the dress rehearsal for the episode. In this hypothetical version of events, a Lee segment would have been originally planned and rehearsed for inclusion in the episode, but it would have been ultimately dropped due to time constraints. The YouTube clip would thus be an excerpt from a dress rehearsal. (Crosby and company usually recorded their dress rehearsals. In fact, the show's engineer created the show's episodes by combining the best parts from the dress rehearsal and the final live show. He would carefully edit the combination onto disc or, later on, magnetic tape.)

Yet another possibility would be that Lee's vocal of "Why Don't You Do Right" was heard not over commercial radio but on the AFRS network. In this scenario, AFRS engineers would have inserted Lee's vocal into their own edition of the May 7, 1947 episode, most likely because the edition was running short. Insertions of this type are by no mean uncommon in AFRS' catalogue. A Peggy Lee vocal such as this one could have been snatched the from any of the show's dress rehearsals, to which the AFRS engineers are known to have had access.


Patter

1. Preamble To "Why Don't You Do Right?"
Bing: And now, Peggy Lee. Clever girl, she always sings after the commercials, so the sponsor will be surely hearing her. What are you gonna sing for the old money bags back in Philadelphia, Peg?
Peggy: Heh, heh. "Why Don't You Do Right?"
Bing: Oh, yes, the song that was such a smash when you recorded it with Benny Goodman some years ago. [Barely audible:] A clever new reading!


Personnel

1. Al Jolson
2. Inving Berlin
The episode that aired on May 7, 1947 at ABC and its affiliates featured Irving Berlin and Al Jolson as guests. As explained above, Peggy Lee is not heard at all in the audio transfers that I have sampled. (The announcer does not make any allusions to her presence, either.)

3. Tentative Personnel
For most episodes of Crosby's radio shows, personnel details remain unknown. The exceptions are the installments which had Al Jolson as a guest. I found details about such Jolson-Crosby dates in the discographical book The Red Nichols Story: After Intermission, 1942-1965, compiled by Philip R. Evans, Stanley Hester, Stephen Hester, and Linda Evans. I presume that the authors' own source was an Al Jolson discography.

The above-listed personnel was the one who played this episode's rehearsal, conducted on March 31, 1947. Since there is no mention of Peggy Lee's presence or involvement, this personnel should be deemed tentative.

That having been said, we can surmise that most of the listed players were regular members of the Trotter-led orchestra that played on this show every week. It is for such a reason that I have listed the entire personnel, even if at least one of these instruments (harp) is not heard in this particular "Why Don't You Do Right?" performance.



Philco Radio Time: The Second Season


This second season of the show consisted of 39 episodes. According to the September 1947 issue of Capitol News, over 350 ABC outlets featured the program across the nation. "Peggy Lee and the Charioteers will be featured frequently— but not every week," the magazine made a point of adding.

The following month, Capitol News had an additional report on the songstress' involvement with the show: "Peggy Lee says that it was with 'real regret' that she found herself unable to continue as regular fem soloist on Bing Crosby’s Wednesday night Philco stanzas. Instead, she will be heard throughout the fall and winter months as vocalist on Jimmy Durante’s program. Peggy accepted the Durante offer after Crosby’s management stalled and postponed contracts. It wasn’t Bing’s fault, Peggy wants it made known. But the Durante pitch, at big money, came along while Bing’s brother, sponsor, agents and others were in a hassle over plans for the new season."  Lee's acceptance of Durante's offer did not mean, however, that she was entirely gone from Crosby's wavelength. During the second season of The Groaner's Philco-sponsored show, Lee would show up on four additional occasions, all them broadcast in February and March of 1948.

This season of Bing Crosby's Philco Radio Time started on October 1, 1947 and concluded on June 2, 1948. Peggy Lee's appearances throughout the season will be discussed next, episode by episode.

Photos above: two Philco Radio Time ads featuring the show's host, Bing Crosby. These ads are from Life magazines issues published on November 25, 1946 (first image) and September 29, 1947 (third image). The middle image is actually an edited version of the first.


Date: October 1, 1947 (Broadcast Date) (Pre-taped 8/10)
Location: Studio B, NBC West Coast Radio City, Hollywod, California
Label: Philco Radio Time, Starring Bing Crosby (2nd Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Perry Botkin, Jr. (g), Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) It Takes A Long, Long Train With A Red Caboose - 2:47(Dick Charles, Lawrence W. Markes, Jr.)
Demand Performance Collectors' Label cassetteDpc 707 — The Unforgettable Peggy Lee   (1985)
Parrot Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Parcd 001 — It's A Good Day {Bing Crosby And Peggy Lee}   (1992)
Castle Communications Licensed CS/CD(United Kingdom) Mat Mc/Cd 316 — Let There Be Love; The Best Of Peggy Lee   (1994)
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) Allá En El Rancho Grande - 0:47(Emilio D. Uranga, Bartley Costello, Jorge Del Moral)
Parrot Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Parr 006 — [Bing Crosby] Hollywood Guys & Gals, Volume 2   (1994)
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 626 — [Bing Crosby] Hollywood Guys & Dolls   (1999)
Both titles on:
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 37 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1947)
Bernard Fox's American Retrospectives Collectors' Label LPMf 207 5 (419-422) — [Bing Crosby] The Greatest Radio Broadcasts   (1978)
Black Lion Collectors' Label LPBlm 52033 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby With Peggy Lee, Jack Benny And Gary Cooper   (1983)
HLC CDHlc 6644 — [Bing Crosby] Bing's Hollywood Party!   (2000)
Sunflower Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Sun 2108 — El Rancho Grande {Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee}   (2005)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 856 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   





Photos

Shots, both featuring this episode's guest, Gary Cooper, next to host Bing Crosby. The last photo was taken on August 10, 1947. The first photo was actually dated August 29, 1949 in one source whose veracity I have not been able to confirm. (I'd be more inclined to deem it from an earlier year.) The context or raison d'être for either photo is not known to me. (It is worth noting that Cooper and Crosby were fine friends, and hence likely to have been around one another on many an occasion. In addition to the present episode, Cooper guested on an episode of Crosby's show broadcast on March 8, 1950.) Also seen above: one of the discs which contained the episode, and which were sent out to radio stations for broadcasting.


Schedule

According to Crosby chronicler Malcolm Macfarlane, this episode was taped (3:35–5:35 p.m., 6:12–6:46 p.m.) on Sunday, August 10. Crosby radio authority Lionel Pairpoint does not identify the day of recording activity, but he does quote a Variety article on which there is a reference to August as the month on which the taping had taken place. Neither expert makes reference to a rehearsal.


A Seminal Show

Starting with this season opener, all episodes of Philco Radio Time would be pre-recorded on magnetic tape. Imported from Nazi Germany (where a German-Austrian engineer had invented it in the late 1920s), magnetic tape had never been previously used in the United States -- not, at least, for the purposes of recording media. The innovation would prove hugely successful; all the radio networks had adopted it by the end of the decade. Through their introduction of tape into the industry, Crosby and company thus made a seminal contribution to the world of radio - a contribution that was applied, for the very first time, to the present episode of the show. (For related photography, consult next session.)

This season opener is easily one of the very best episodes of the Philco series. Crosby is in fine form, Cooper proves an effective line reader, and Lee not only sings but also speaks her lines in engaging ways. Furthermore, the audience displays a sheer amount of enthusiasm, laughing, clapping, and clearly enjoying the proceedings throughout. Trade reviewers were just as enthusiastic. Witness, for instance, this excerpt from a review published by Variety:

Show seemed, to this reviewer at least, to have picked up markedly in quality of the reproduction, even over the final platters of last season — a fact apparently attributable to a switchover from acetate records to German-made "magnetaphone" tape recorders to transcribe the program. Show is now edited on tape, then transferred to platters. Result, as it came through last week, is the most "live"-like tones yet fed over network skeins. Aside from the stanza's achievements in waxed fidelity, however, it is additionally improved 100% as an entertainment article. A formula has been arrived at, as an outgrowth of last season's trial-and-error experimenting, in which El Bingo seems perfectly at home. Format has none of the rigidity of, say, Bob Hope's show, but rather allows Crosby to croon and caper through the half-hour in a leisurely, old-hat manner.



Personnel

1. Guest
For the first installment of the season, Hollywood star Gary Cooper is enlisted as the guest. He and Peggy Lee participate extensively in the episode's sketch -- as shown below, under Patter.

2. Solos And Duets
The lengthily titled "It Takes A Long, Long Train With A Red Caboose (To Carry My Blues Away)" is Peggy Lee's solo for this episode. The other above-listed number, "Allá En El Rancho Grande," is a trio with Crosby and guest star Gary Cooper.

3. Perry Botkin, Sr.
The identification of Perry Botkin as the man playing guitar on "It Takes A Long, Long Train With A Red Caboose" should be deemed tentative, though very likely. (There is no question that Botkin was present for this episode; Bing Crosby refers to him by name. The question is whether Lee is backed by him or by somebody else, the "somebody else" being her husband, guitarist Dave Barbour. In a few episodes of the previous season, Barbour had backed Lee's numbers, and Crosby had acknowledged his presence. Since no such acknowledgments of Barbour are heard in this or in any other episode of the second season, Botkin is the likelier possibility.)

4. The Rhythmaires
The previous season haad seen the departure of the show's long-tenured vocal group, The Charioteers. With this new season, Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires take over the role.


Songs

1. "Allá En El Rancho Grande"
Singing mostly in unison, Cooper, Crosby, and Lee tackle the English lyrics of this song (not the Spanish ones). They do only two choruses. As can be gathered from the dialogue transcribed below, the tune is part of the episode's comic sketch.


Patter

1. Preamble To "It Takes A Long, Long Train With A Red Caboose"
Music is heard while Bing Crosby utters the following words.
Bing: Let that feathery little musical vamp serve as an introduction to an old friend of our Philco fest fans, the very mellow, super-talented, Miss Peggy Lee.
Peggy: Hi, Bing!
[Audience applause]
Bing: Beautiful [probably said in response to Peggy's special intonation of the words "hi, Bing"]. Peggy, you are looking just as bright as a bamboo jukebox. What are you going to sing for this October coming-out soiree?
Peggy: It Takes A Long, Long Train With A Red Caboose To Carry My Blues Away.
Bing: Oh, it's bad all over the country, isn't it?
Peggy: Ha, ha!
Bing: Wait til I join John Scott Trotter on the tender. [A]Booooard!
[As the music keeps playing, Crosby is briefly heard in the background, yelling like a train conductor.]

2. Comedy Dialogue
After she finishes singing, Lee and Crosby continue to chat.
Bing: Oh, Peggy. That's a trip. That was a gas. Just like the record. You are singing better and better every year. I wish I could say the same for myself.
Peggy: Ha. Golly, Bing. You have no idea how thrilled I am.
Bing: Oh, it's just a little compliment; I'm full of it. I mean, full of them.
Peggy: Heh, heh. Oh, what I really meant, Bing, is that I'm thrilled that Gary Cooper is going to be on the program tonight. You know, I just love those tall, lean men.
Bing: Um-hum. Couldn't you hold still for a medium round chile?
Peggy: [Chuckles.] Not with [stops very briefly, trying not to laugh] ... Not with a tall, lean one available.
Bing: Well, Peggy, I think it would be better if you met Gary later. He's such a very shy sort of fellow. Doesn't talk very much. As a matter of fact, he's pretty bashful.
Peggy: You mean, you want me to leave, Bing?
Bing: No, no. Look, why don't you go over and hide behind the moose? [n.b.: At the opening of the episode, and as part of a gag alluding to his well-publicized hunting trips, Crosby is said to enter the studio with a moose as company.] Coop loves animals and that will put you in solid with him.
The preceding dialogue elicits a fair amount of laughter from the audience.

3. The Sketch
The episode's sketch is categorized as a "new-fangled western" starring High-Pockets Cooper, Creep-Along Crosby, and gal. The plot grows out of the long chat that Cooper and Crosby had had, in which Crosby had asked Cooper if he had plans to make more westerns. Cooper had remarked that the new westerns had more rhythm (i.e., music) than ranching. Hence, for his next western, Cooper was feeling that he needed to enlist Crosby, due to his singing skills. After more banter on the same topic, they move on to the sketch. The action opens with Crosby and Cooper singing "Home On The Range" as they ride their horses into Sage-Grouse, on the outskirts of Tuscaroura, Nevada. "Home On The Range" is sung in hillbilly style and with partially new lyrics that refer to the characters' situation. A few minutes into the sketch, they come upon a gal.
Peggy: Hiya, boys.
Gary: Haw.
Bing: Gee.
Bing: Say, what kind of horse is that you are riding?
Peggy: Ain't no horse. It's a bicycle.
Gary: It's only got one pedal. What's the idea?
Peggy: I ride side-saddle.
Bing: Side saddle, huh?
Bing proceeds to sing a tune called "Side-saddle Sue," with Gary helpfully interjecting a few lines.
Peggy [interrupting the singing]: Just a minute, boys. Just a minute. My name ain't Sue. It's Peg.
The men then sing "Side-saddled Peg."
Peggy [interrupting the singing again]: Boys, boys. Just a minute. How would you like a job?
The men then sing the words "side-saddled job, side-saddled job."
Peggy: Hey, boys, stop. This is important. I'm in desperate need of some hands over my ranch, the ?Sixmore ?Red. We're organizing a party.
Bing: Yeah?
Gary: Well, without being a bright man, I'd like to say that we're the toughest ?_____ in these parts.
Bing: Why man, we are tougher than the Sons of the Pioneers, and I include the Old Ranger!
Gary: Yes, sir. Should we ride over with you, ma'am?
Peggy: No, you go on ahead and I'll join you. I just did my wash and I got to hang it up to dry!
Bing: Ah, When the Bloomer Is On The Sage.
Bing & Gary proceed to sing a couple of made-up lines to the tune of "When The Bloom Is On The Sage" (changing the word "bloom" to "bloomer"). The sung lines are abruptly cut by instrumental music. (Presumably played by Trotter, this bit of instrumental music is clearly used as a transitional device. It's meant to signal that some time has passed since the previous dialogue and the upcoming exchange.)
Peggy: Howdy boys. Ready to work?"
Gary: Howdy, Miss Peggy. I thought you had some laundry to hang out. How come you got here so soon?"
Peggy: Well, I got them quick-drying bloomers."
Bing: Ho! Wrong emphasis. Quick-drying bloomers?"
A new character steps in then, telling them in an excited voice that the warm and wet Chinook wind is coming into the area.
Bing: What's a-coming?
Peggy: The big Chinook from the North! We gotta catch it!
Gary: What can a handful of cowpokes do about a Chinook? When 'em start coming straight down, it ain't nothing nobody can do.
New Character: Oh, yes, there is, stranger. That's why we need you.
Bing: Why?
New Character: Well, partner, this ranch is full of gopher holes. When that wind comes blowing down the canyon across 'em holes, it plays the prairie like a piccolo!
Bing: Well, hot doggett, that's what I call a _____! What tune does the big wind plays when it rips across 'em gopher holes?
Peggy: El Rancho Grande.
Bing: El Rancho Grande? Well, we are in luck. That's the best tune my partner Low-Note Cooper does.
Gary: Yep, yep, let's hit it. Here comes the wind.
The sketch concludes with the singing of the tune by Cooper, Crosby, and Lee.


Date: October 8, 1947 (Broadcast Date) (Pre-taped 8/15)
Location: Studio B, NBC West Coast Radio City, Hollywood, California
Label: Philco Radio Time, Starring Bing Crosby (2nd Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) Just An Old Love Of Mine - 2:22(Peggy Lee, Dave Barbour)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 38 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1948)
Parrot Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Parcd 001 — It's A Good Day {Bing Crosby And Peggy Lee}   (1992)
President Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Plcd 550 — Listen To The Magic    (1996)








Photos

Pictures of Bing Crosby and the device with which he and his associates changed the word of radio recording: Ampex machines, used to tape his shows from October 1947 onwards. Ampex 200, the original machine, is seen on the second image. The other solo Crosby photographs show Ampex 600, the first portable model, which did not come into existence until the 1950s. In the last two photos, the top team at Bing Crosby Enterprises appraises the boss of their progress. From left to right: engineer and key conceptualizer Jack Mullin, company publicist Frank Healey, engineer Wayne Johnson, and their paying man. For general detail on this topic, consult the notes under the preceding session.


Schedule

According to Crosby chronicler Malcolm Macfarlane, this episode was taped (1:53–2:53 p.m., 4:40–5:17 p.m.) on Friday, August 15. Crosby radio authority Lionel Pairpoint does not identify the exact day of recording activity. Neither expert makes reference to a rehearsal.


Personnel

1. Guest
Following his last appearance in the show (April 16, 1947), Jimmy Durante returns as a guest, noticeably elevating the atmosphere of revelry and playfulness.


Patter

1. Introduction To "Just One More Chance"
As instrumental music is heard, Bing Crosby says: These lovely bars of music herald a new song written by Peggy Lee and Dave Barbour, Just An Old Love Of Mine. Peggy is gonna sing it, too.

2. Peggy Lee Contributions To The Comedy Routine
Jimmy Durante tells Bing Crosby that lately he has been driving a Stanley Steamer, which operates on coal.
Jimmy: The embarrasing part is when I take a girl out. By the time we get up to the top of Lookout Mountain, the poor thing is pooped out from stoking.
Bing: I don't believe it. I can't believe that even a man of your magnetic personality could charm a girl into shoveling coal.
Peggy: Hi, Bing. Is this boy talk or can I muscle in?
Bing: Well, come right in, Peggy. You know Peggy, don't you, Jimmy?
Jimmy: Of course! I had the honor of driving Miss Peggy Lee to the studio tonight.
Bing: Right, Peggy?
Peggy: Right. And here's your shovel back, Jimmy.
Jimmy: Hi, hi, hi. I've never had any luck with singers. The same thing happened with Hildegarde.
Bing: You mean that you had Hildegarde shoveling coal for you?
Jimmy: Only for a brief moment, Bing. After three blocks, she got out of the car and said, "a little walking music, please, Harry."

2. Jimmy Durante's Rexall Show
At the end of the episode, Durante's new radio show is plugged. "Say, Jimmy, the word's out that you -- that you've got your own show for United Rexall Drugs this year," Crosby remarks. "That's right, Bingo," replies Jimmy, before he moves on to another joke. Peggy Lee would go on to become the girl singer of Durante's show, too. For an overview of Lee's work in the comedian's programs, consult this page.


Date: February 11, 1948 (Broadcast Date) (Pre-taped 12/21)
Location: Studio B, NBC West Coast Radio City, Hollywood, California
Label: Philco Radio Time, Starring Bing Crosby (2nd Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Emmanuel "Manny" Klein (t), Loring "Red" Nichols (c), Perry Botkin, Jr. (g), Edwin "Buddy" Cole, Oscar Levant (p), Nick Fatool (d), Harry Bluestone aka Blostein, Joe Venuti (vn), Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) 'S Wonderful - 1:07(George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin)
Artistic Collectors' Label LP(United Kingdom) 001 — [Bing Crosby] Bing's Party   (1979)
Sounds Of Yesteryear Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Dsoy 605 — [Bing Crosby] I Got Rhythm   (2002)
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) I've Got A Crush On You - 1:05(Ira Gershwin, George Gershwin)
Artistic Collectors' Label LP(United Kingdom) 001 — [Bing Crosby] Bing's Party   (1979)
On The Air/Blaricum Collectors' Label CS/CD(Netherlands) Ota 401978/101978 — [Bing Crosby] Great Moments With Bing Crosby And Friends, From The Radio Shows    (1997)
Sounds Of Yesteryear Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Dsoy 605 — [Bing Crosby] I Got Rhythm   (2002)
c. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) They Can't Take That Away From Me - 2:30(George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin)
Artistic Collectors' Label LP(United Kingdom) 001 — [Bing Crosby] Bing's Party   (1979)
Sounds Of Yesteryear Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Dsoy 605 — [Bing Crosby] I Got Rhythm   (2002)
d. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) I Got Rhythm - 1:39(George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin)
Artistic Collectors' Label LP(United Kingdom) 001 — [Bing Crosby] Bing's Party   (1979)
Sounds Of Yesteryear Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Dsoy 605 — [Bing Crosby] I Got Rhythm   (2002)
e. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) Summertime - 2:31(George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin, Dubose Heyward)
All titles on:
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 56 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1948)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 2137 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   









Photos

Advertisement for the present episode of Crosby's show (first and third image). Head shots highlight the participation of Oscar Levant and Joe Venuti. Moreover, a short text proclaims their joint performance of the Gershwin songbook, plus the "perky" presence of Peggy Lee. Not part of the ad, the above-shown photo finds Levant and Crosby getting together for another performance, with Al Jolson also in tow. Note that this undated photograph seems to be a companion take to a Jolson-Crosby photo shown up above, under the May 7, 1947 broadcast. The two shots may capture one out of about a dozen Jolson guest appearances on Crosby's Philco and Chesterfield programs, or perhaps one of their joint Decca sessions. An additional, likelier possibility: the occasion could have been either of Crosby's guest appearances on Al's Kraft Music Hall show (October 16, 1947; January 15, 1948), in which Levant was also a regular, strong presence.


Schedule

According to Crosby chronicler Malcolm Macfarlane, this episode was taped (5:00–6:18 p.m., 7:30–8:30 p.m.) on Sunday, December 21, 1947. Crosby radio authority Lionel Pairpoint does not identify the exact day of recording activity. Neither expert makes reference to a rehearsal.


Personnel & Cross-references

1. Guests
As the episode's guests, announcer Ken Carpenter lists Oscar Levant, Peggy Lee, and Joe Venuti (in that order). At the end of the show, Carpenter adds that Peggy Lee "appears through the courtesy of the Rexall Drug Company" (an indirect reference to her contract as the regular girl singer for The Jimmy Durante Rexall Show). Note also that, in terms of featured players and performances (specifically, the song medley to be itemized below), this episode had a sequel, broadcast on February 11, 1948.


Songs

1. A Gershwin Medley
The bulk of this episode is dedicated to the compositions of George Gershwin, as performed by Bing and his guests. Here is a list of the compositions, in the order in which they are performed:

Somebody Loves Me - Bing Crosby vocal
Oh! Lady be Good - Joe Venuti instrumental
Second Rhapsody - Oscar Levant instrumental
Do, Do, Do - Oscar Levant instrumental
Someone To Watch Over Me - Bing Crosby solo
’S Wonderful - vocal duet by Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee
I’ve Got A Crush On You - vocal duet by Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee
I’ve Got A Crush On You - Oscar Levant instrumental
I’m Just Wild About Harry - Oscar Levant on vocal and piano
Love Is Sweeping The Country - Bing Crosby vocal
They Can’t Take That Away From Me - vocal duet by Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee
Third Prelude For Piano - Oscar Levant instrumental
Bidin’ My Time - Oscar Levant vocal
I Got Rhythm - vocal duet by Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee
[Interruption: a promotional commercial on behalf of Philco - delivered by Ken Carpenter]
Summertime - vocal duet by Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee

This is a medley. The performed selections are not sung in full. Most of the Crosby-Lee duets are delivered in two or three choruses, but other lyrics are
circumscribed to just a couple of lines. For a few of the selections, Crosby and Lee quickly identify the year and the show in which the song originated. (These identifications are not impromptu comments, but part of the episode's script. In this session's listings of performances, the timings reflect not only the playing and singing of each song but also those preceding, spoken introductions.)

In the case of the medley's last tune, "Summertime," the song is heard at length, as suggested by the timing above. However, an upload featuring a truncated or edited version (about two lines of lyrics) also circulates. I do not know the origination of that abbreviated version. Its existence could be an indication that this performance had to be cut for one of the two coast's broadcasts, due to time constraints. Just as likely, the edit could have been carried out by the uploader, or his source.


Patter

1. Peggy Lee's Incorporation To The Medley Segment
Bing: We also have a very fancy young lady to help out, too. You know Peggy Lee, don't you?
Oscar: Sure. Hello Peggy.
Peggy: Hello, boys.
[Audience applauds.]

2. Prelude To " 'S Wonderful" And "I've Got A Crush On You"
Peggy: Hey, Bing you know a Gershwin tune that always sends me?
Bing: Which one is that, Peggy"
Peggy: " 'S Wonderful."
Bing: Oh, yeah, good old wonderful. From Funny Face, 1927. Should we sing it, Peg?
After they finish singing, Crosby proceeds to introduce the next song.
Bing: That was a big smash, and there was another big Gershwin hit too, Strike Up The Band.
Peggy: Bing, wasn't that the show I've Got A Crush On You came from?
Bing: That's it, Peggy.
Peggy: Let's sing that one.
Bing: Well, I love it ...

3. Prelude And Postscript To "They Can't Take That Away From Me"
Bing: Say, Oscar, would you like to stand by for a minute while Miss Lee and I do a chorus of a really great Gershwin ballad? Bring me in, John.
After the duet performance, and amidst audience's appreciative applause, Crosby continues to offer factual tidbits.
Bing: That was from George and Ira Gershwin's score Shall We Dance.

4. Prelude To "Summertime"
Bing: From the great American folk opera Porgy And Bess, this is a classic among American folk songs.


Date: February 25, 1948 (Broadcast Date) (Pre-taped 12/22)
Location: Studio B, NBC West Coast Radio City, Hollywood, California
Label: Philco Radio Time, Starring Bing Crosby (2nd Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Perry Botkin, Jr. (g), Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) Golden Earrings - 3:19(Raymond B. "Ray" Evans, Jay Livingston, Victor Popular Young)
Demand Performance Collectors' Label cassetteDpc 707 — The Unforgettable Peggy Lee   (1985)
Parrot Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Parcd 001 — It's A Good Day {Bing Crosby And Peggy Lee}   (1992)
Castle Communications Licensed CS/CD(United Kingdom) Mat Mc/Cd 316 — Let There Be Love; The Best Of Peggy Lee   (1994)
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) It's About Time I Wrote The Folks In Terra Haute - 1:42(John Kiley)
c. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) Was Last Night The Last Night With You? - 0:46(Jack Brooks)
d. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) Boise, Idaho - 3:01(Ed Walsh)
HLC CDHlc 6649 — [Bing Crosby] On The Air; Bing Crosby & Peggy Lee   (2000)
e. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) These Lush Moments - 2:02(Johnny Burke, Jimmy Van Heusen)
All titles on:
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 58 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1947)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 296 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   





Photos

In this episode's comic patter, Peggy Lee corners herself into a tough spot, where she has to make an impossible choice: on which of the two radio hosts for whom she assiduously worked should she bestow the title of "best voice?" Should the ultimate praise go to Crosby's croon ... or should it fall on Durante's grunt? (The photo with Durante dates from March 10, 1948, the photo with Crosby from November 29, 1949.)


Schedule

According to Crosby chronicler Malcolm Macfarlane, this episode was recorded (3:20–4:40 p.m., 6:30–7:10 p.m.) on Monday, December 22. Crosby radio authority Lionel Pairpoint also identifies December 22 as the day of recording activity. No references to rehearsals are made by either expert.


Personnel

1. Guest
At the start of the program, Peggy Lee is identified as this episode's guest. At the end of the show, Bing Crosby thanks her for the appearance (as he regularly did for every guest) and Ken Carpenter adds that she appeared in the show through the courtesy of Rexall Drug Products. (By this time, Peggy Lee was the girl singer of Jimmy Durante's Rexall show.)


Songs

1. Solos And Duets
Of the above-listed performances, only "Golden Earrings" is a solo. All the other numbers are Lee-Crosby duets.

2. The All-Time Flop Parade
A parody of the popular show Your Hit Parade, this episode's All-Time Flop Parade consists of 6 numbers, of which 4 were sung as duets and two as solos. Crosby and Lee preface each number with slightly mocking, playful commentary, and with the identification of each songwriter by name. Here is a list of the so-called flops, arranged in the order in which the two vocalists performed them:

Mississippi Moon - Bing Crosby solo
It’s About Time That I Wrote To The Folks In Terra Haute - duet by Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee
Was Last Night The Last Night With You? - duet by Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee
Tortured - Bing Crosby solo
Boise, Idaho - duet by Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee
These Lush Moments - duet by Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee

This All-Time Flop Parade was actually the second round of flops heard in the show. The first round, broadcast as part of the October 15, 1948 episode, had also consisted of six songs, interpreted by Bing Crosby with his guest Dinah Shore. In that previous round, four of the six above-listed had been performed by Crosby and Shore. "Tortured" and "Boise, Idaho" were newly added to this episode.

A third round of the All-Time Flop Parade would be heard on May 19, 1947, with Ethel Merman as Crosby's duet partner. On that round, a total of 5 numbers were performed, including the Crosby solo "Tortured" and the duet "Boise, Idaho." Merman and Crosby would join forces again for the fourth round (March 23, 1949), which featured a brand new set of songs. Though no longer identified as part of a Flop Parade, some of these songs would also be tried by Crosby with guest Judy Garland in a 1950 episode. (That guesting Garland episode was part of Crosby's series for Chesterfield, not Philco.)


Songwriters

1. John Kinley
2. Jack Brooks
3. Ed Walsh
4. Johnny Burke & Jimmy Van Heusen
My attribution of the above-listed songs to the songwriters next to them is entirely based on Bing Crosby's acknowledgments of these men during the airing of the episode. It should be noted that these acknowledgments are uttered with tongue planted in cheek. For instance, Crosby tells his audience that he and Lee will be doing "John Kiley's immortal song of a Hoosier lad who strayed from home, It's About Time I Wrote The Folks In Terra Haute."

Of the five songwriters in question, three (Burke, Van Heusen, and Jack Brooks) are relatively well-known. My attempts at finding information about the other two have not proven successful. In the case of Ed Walsh, Peggy Lee informs us that the song he wrote was meant "for the homecoming extravaganza show of the University of California." My follow up of her lead did not trigger any additional details, unfortunately.

As for John Kiley, he might or might have not been the organist of that name who worked in silent movies and at various Boston, MA recreational spaces (Fenway Park, Boston Garden). That John Kiley had strong ties to radio programming, serving as music director at a MA radio station (WMEX) from 1934 to about 1956. However, his geographical whereabouts do not betray any direct connection with Crosby's California-based show: Kiley appears to have remained in the Boston area for much of his life, including the years under consideration.

Since I have found no corroboration for any of these songwriting credits (aside from the existence of three of the songwriters), and since Crosby and Lee's comments were clearly made in a jocular vein, all attributions should be deemed tentative.


Personnel

1. Perry Botkin, Sr.
During the episode, Bing Crosby credits guitarist Perry Botkin for his participation in It's About Time I Wrote The Folks In Terra Haute.


Patter

1. Preamble To "Golden Earrings"
Bing Crosby waits for Peggy Lee to hum quite a few bars of Golden Earrings, before he finally says: "One of the greatest records Peggy Lee ever made was Golden Earrings. Here tonight is her personalized version of it."

2. Dialogue Preceding The All-Time Flop Parade
After Lee finishes singing, she and Crosby engage in small talk.
Bing: That was very gossamer, Peggy. Got some more like it?
Peggy: Lots-some, Bing.
Bing: While I'm still under the spell of your voice, I wanna confess something to you. The work you've been doing over on Durante's show's very impressive.
Peggy: Oh, thank you.
Bing: I'm not the least bit mad because you threw me over for Jimmy. The best man won.
Peggy: [Chuckles.] You know, there are times when Jimmy's voice really thrills me. It's so haunting.
Bing: Haunting?
Peggy: Yeah.
Bing: Oh, Peggy, come, pull yourself together.
Peggy: Pull myself to...
Bing: Let's face it, Jimmy's a sweetheart but his voice to me sounds like two st[i]cks of celery chewing each other to shreds on a tin roof.
Peggy: Of course, you -- you can't compare Jimmy's voice with yours.
Bing: Not after what I just said. Anyhow, Peggy, you recall a few months ago when Dinah Shore and I did a batch of ballads that nobody had heard before?
Peggy: Oh, sure, you did sort of a broken-down hip parade
Bing: Yeah, that's right. You do hear our show once in a while.
Peggy: Yeah, yeah, ha.
Bing: You are the one! Say, I wonder if you'd like to break down with me tonight, Peggy, and do a second edition of that show?
Peggy: Well, why, certainly. What can I lose?
Bing: Just your reputation.
Peggy: Ha, ha. Well, Bing, I think it's a good idea to do some tunes that never quite made the grade.
Bing: Yes, you are so right. Who needs popular songs?
Peggy: [Chuckles.] Well, not me. I've heard The Best Things In Life Are Free so many times I tore up all my money.
Bing: I know what you mean. I've sung Dance Ballerina Dance so often I can't get off my toes. Alright, maybe the next ?Mrs. ?H__
Peggy: You know, and once a song catches on, it sure gets around.
Bing: And how. I've heard Too Fat Polka -- you know that song -- so many times I've ordered a girdle!
Peggy: Heh, heeh. Well, you've never worn a girdle, have you, Bing?
Bing: No, but Hope tells me they feel great when you get them off. Hey, Peggy, let's get started on our program of songs fighting for recognition.
Peggy: Ready, Bing. But what will we call the program?
Bing: Stand by, Peggy. John Scott Trotter, fan us a fare.
After Ken Carpenter jokingly announces The All-Time Flop Parade (complete with even a made-up commercial, promoting not a hair product but hair itself), Crosby and Lee continue. In addition to singing the numbers, they also introduce them in suitable manner -- adopting hillbilly accents in one case, for instance.


Date: March 24, 1948 (Broadcast Date)
Location: Hollywood, California
Label: Philco Radio Time, Starring Bing Crosby (2nd Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee (v), Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires {Conlon, Mack McLean, Loulie "Lily" Jean Norman, Charles Parlato, Gloria Wood} (bkv)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) Mañana - 3:12(Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee)
Gav Collectors' Label commercial CDrGavcd 1003 — [Bing Crosby] It's Magic   
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) Easter Parade - 2:38(Irving Berlin)
Magic/Submarine Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Dawe 48 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Swings   (1991)
Sunflower Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Sun 2108 — El Rancho Grande {Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee}   (2005)
Sunflower Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom)Sun 2158 — [Various Artists] The Irving Berlin Songbook   (2006)
Both titles on:
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 62 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1948)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 298 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   





Photos

The Smokin' Hot Piper Series, continued. (Part X.) Crosby caught in fraganti ... Aye, the betrayal. How could you, Bing, how could you cheat on your comely, lissome pipe -- and with such ordinary cigarettes, no less? .... But wait. Perk up, Pipe: it is all make believe. Both of these images are publicity shots (the first promoting the 1935 Paramount musical film Two For Tonight).

Bing's lips did have a shameful past in which they had tasted forbidden pleasures, though. According to at least one of his biographers, our crooner was originally a cigarette smoker. He had given up cigarettes and taken to pipe smoking out of a desire to appease his mother, who could not stand the former (but presumably found the latter tolerable). Furthermore, Crosby promoted cigarette brands in the early 1930s, and again in the late 1940s (when, as we will see below, Chesterfield Cigarettes became his show's sponsor).


The Show

1. Live Or Pre-taped?
In their respective Crosby texts, chronicler Malcolm Macfarlane and radio expert Lionel Pairpoint label this episode as "transcribed," but give no date for the alleged taping.

In the February 1948 issue of Capitol News, we are told that Bing Crosby, busy with charity snd social events, film, sports, and many other activities, had recently been "able to wax enough airshows to run him through March 17. From then on, he goes live." It thus may be that the present episode was prepared in the 'old manner.'

However, we can not discard the possibility of a change plans, either. Crosby and his associates could have eventually made the time to pre-tape the episodes that followed the one that aired on March 17, including the present one. For the time being, this matter remains unsolved.


Personnel

1. Guests
Ken Carpenter credits both Wild Bill Elliott and Peggy Lee as guests.


Songs

1. Solos And Duets
Peggy Lee sings no solos in this episode. Both of her numbers are duets with Bing Crosby. One duet, "Easter Parade," would be sung again during the April 13, 1949 broadcast of the show. The other number, "Mañana," would also be heard again, though much later (on December 7, 1949) and as a Lee solo vocal.


Issues

1. It's Magic [CD, Gav Records]
Because I have not listened to this Bing Crosby CD, my identification of version of "Mañana" as the one from the March 28, 1948 broadcast is tentative. The alternative is that the CD contains instead the aforementioned Lee solo version, from the December 7, 1949 broadcast. However, the fact that It's Magic is a Bing Crosby issue makes this session's duet version the likeliest to be in that CD.


Patter And Sketches

1. Preamble To Mañana
During the segment between Ken Carpenter and Bing Crosby that customarily happens at the start of the show, the announcer informs the crooner about the mail that has been arriving at the station. After joking about two letters sent by Crosby's brothers, Carpenter makes mention of Lee.
Ken: Peggy Lee sent you a copy of the latest song that she wrote woth Dave Barbour.
Bing: Oh, Mañana. That really jumps. I wish Peggy were here. I'd like her to sing it with me.
Ken: Yah.
Peggy: I'm here, Bing.
Bing: Well, Peggy Lee!
[Audience applause]
Bing (tongue-in-cheek): Now, isn't that radio for you. You just mention somebody's name and up they pop!
Peggy: That's right, Pops. Shall we hit it?
Bing: Let's cut it but good, Peggy. John [Scott Trotter], let's make like [Xavier] Cugat, huh?
After the duet is finished, Carpenter asks Crosby why he hasn't written any songs. (The scripted question is actually a means to the end of doing the episode's promotion of Philco products.)

2. Wild West Sketch
During the episode's sketch (an old west/hillbilly piece), Wild Bill and his sidekick "Gaby" Crosby are joined by both Ken Carpenter and Peggy Lee. The former actually plays a prominent role (Rattlesnake Carpenter) with quite a few lines; the latter is heard only for a couple of brief lines, playing a hillbilly horserider upon whom Elliott and Crosby come across, on the road.


Date: April 7, 1948 (Broadcast Date)
Location: Hollywood, California
Label: Philco Radio Time, Starring Bing Crosby (2nd Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Fred Astaire, Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) Cheek To Cheek: Astaire Movie Medley - 0:50(Irving Berlin)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 64 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1948)
Parrot Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Parcd 001 — It's A Good Day {Bing Crosby And Peggy Lee}   (1992)
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 624 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby With Ella Fitzgerald And Peggy Lee, Featuring Fred Astaire   (1997)
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) Isn't This A Lovely Day: Astaire Movie Medley - 1:12(Irving Berlin)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 64 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1948)
Parrot Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Parcd 001 — It's A Good Day {Bing Crosby And Peggy Lee}   (1992)
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 624 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby With Ella Fitzgerald And Peggy Lee, Featuring Fred Astaire   (1997)
c. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) A Fine Romance: Astaire Movie Medley - 1:10(Dorothy Fields, Jerome Kern)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 64 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1948)
Parrot Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Parcd 001 — It's A Good Day {Bing Crosby And Peggy Lee}   (1992)
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 624 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby With Ella Fitzgerald And Peggy Lee, Featuring Fred Astaire   (1997)
d. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) They Can't Take That Away From Me: Astaire Movie Medley - 1:02(George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 64 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1948)
Parrot Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Parcd 001 — It's A Good Day {Bing Crosby And Peggy Lee}   (1992)
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 624 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby With Ella Fitzgerald And Peggy Lee, Featuring Fred Astaire   (1997)
e. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) Smoke Gets In Your Eyes: Astaire Movie Medley - 2:11(Otto Harbach, Jerome Kern)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 64 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1948)
Parrot Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Parcd 001 — It's A Good Day {Bing Crosby And Peggy Lee}   (1992)
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 624 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby With Ella Fitzgerald And Peggy Lee, Featuring Fred Astaire   (1997)
f. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) Dearly Beloved: Astaire Movie Medley - 1:21(Jerome Kern, Johnny Mercer)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 64 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1948)
Parrot Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Parcd 001 — It's A Good Day {Bing Crosby And Peggy Lee}   (1992)
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 624 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby With Ella Fitzgerald And Peggy Lee, Featuring Fred Astaire   (1997)
g. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) White Christmas: Astaire Movie Medley - 2:05(Irving Berlin)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 64 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1948)
Parrot Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Parcd 001 — It's A Good Day {Bing Crosby And Peggy Lee}   (1992)
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 624 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby With Ella Fitzgerald And Peggy Lee, Featuring Fred Astaire   (1997)
h. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) Catalogue Day: Astaire Movie Medley - 1:10(Johnny Burke, Jimmy Van Heusen)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 64 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1948)
Parrot Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Parcd 001 — It's A Good Day {Bing Crosby And Peggy Lee}   (1992)
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 624 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby With Ella Fitzgerald And Peggy Lee, Featuring Fred Astaire   (1997)
i. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) Kamehameha Day: Astaire Movie Medley - 0:53(Johnny Burke, Jimmy Van Heusen)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 64 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1948)
Parrot Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Parcd 001 — It's A Good Day {Bing Crosby And Peggy Lee}   (1992)
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 624 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby With Ella Fitzgerald And Peggy Lee, Featuring Fred Astaire   (1997)
j. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) [Musical Commercial] Everyday Is A Philco Day - 0:50(unknown)
All titles on:
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 299 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   





Photos

Bing Crosby starred in three musical films showcasing the songs of Irving Berlin: Holiday Inn (1942), Blues Skies (1946), and White Christmas (1954). Fred Astaire was scheduled to be his co-star on the entire trilogy, though he ultimately decided to bow out of the third, 1954 installment. The photos above capture the celebrated men first at rehearsal and then on the actual shooting of Blue Skies -- the trilogy installment that happens to be chronologically closer to the present radio broadcast.

Of course, Philco was keen on radio-capturing the pair's magic (or, shall we say instead, some of their popularity and its dividends). Accordingly, the ad above promised to Philco audiences a whole song-and-dance show on the evening of April 7, 1948. When the time for the broadcast came, listeners who tuned did hear plenty of song .... but had no dancing to watch. Peggy Lee joined the musical proceedings as well, performing side by side with Astaire and Crosby, though never ever cavorting in their above-shown manner.


The Show And The Technology

1. Live Or Pre-taped?
In their respective Crosby texts, chronicler Malcolm Macfarlane and radio expert Lionel Pairpoint label this episode as "transcribed," but give no date for the alleged taping. See Show notes in the preceding section, discussing the likelihood that this episode was not pre-taped but performed live at the time it first aired. Then again, see next entry.

2. Tapes, Discs, And Ampex
Crosby chronicler Malcolm Macfarlane quotes from an article by engineer John Mullin that High Fidelity published in April 1976. Mullin tells us that ABC received its first two Ampex tape recorders (200 model) in April 1948, followed by a dozen more machines shortly thereafter. He further specifies that the new machines went into use on the 27th episode of the show, which would actually be the last episode of March, preceding the present one (March 31, 1948, sans Peggy Lee).

Before the arrival of these machines, Mullin had been both taping the episodes on his own, somewhat outdated Magnetophon machines, and then transferring the tape contents onto transcription discs. The reason for the need to transfer to ET disc appears to have been ABC's lingering unease over the reliability of the Magnetophon tape machines. Hitherto, the network had stipulate that the episodes had to be broadcast from the ET transfers, not from the original tapes.

With the arrival of the brand new Ampex machines, confidence on the taping process increased, and ET discs began to lose their prevalence.


Personnel

1. Guests
Fred Astaire and Peggy Lee are as credited as the episode's guests. At the end of the show, Bing thanks them both ("I want to thank Fred Astaire for dropping in tonight ... Also a deep bow to Miss Peggy Lee") and they reply in kind ("I had fun, too, Bing," says Peggy.) As part of that end, Lee is tasked with the customary script question about the guests for the next episode. But, as she is in the process of asking, she completely cracks up, to the audience's merriment. "Sing it, Peggy!," Bing helpfully advices. Lee follows the advice, half-speaking and half-singing the line "who's with you next week?," though still with a laughing, cracking voice. (The cracking up was probably triggered by a bit of hilarious humming by The Rhythmaires. Their humming had taken place during Bing's thank you to Fred, and had elicited general laughter.)


Songs

1. Astaire Medley
All the titles listed in this session were performed as part of a medley that consisted of songs from Astaire's movie musicals. Each number receives fairly brief coverage -- about one chorus. Heard between the songs are spoken snippets -- mostly amicable dialogue, aiming at introducing the next song. Naturally, only the performances which feature Peggy Lee are listed above. Below is a full list of all the songs and their performers:

Top Hat, White Tie And Tails - Bing Crosby and Fred Astaire
Cheek To Cheek - Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee
Isn’t This A Lovely Day? - Bing Crosby, Fred Astaire, and Peggy Lee
A Fine Romance - Bing Crosby, Fred Astaire, and Peggy Lee
They Can’t Take That Away From Me - Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee
Smoke Gets In Your Eyes - Peggy Lee solo
Dearly Beloved - Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee
White Christmas - Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee
Catalogue Day - Bing Crosby, Fred Astaire, and Peggy Lee
Kamehameha Day - Bing Crosby, Fred Astaire, and Peggy Lee
Everyday Is A Philco Day [Commercial] - Bing Crosby, Fred Astaire, and Peggy Lee
Kamehameha Day [quick reprise] - Bing Crosby, Fred Astaire, and Peggy Lee

2. "Catalogue Day" & "Kamehameha Day"
3. Astaire & Crosby
4. Burke & Van Heusen
Unlike the rest of the medley's songs, these two tunes are not from Astaire's movies. They are instead parodic, intentionally subpar pieces. Supposedly, Astaire & Crosby wrote them themselves, in response to Irving Berlin's tendency to compose numbers in honor of every holiday in the calendar (see Patter below). Most probably, the writers were not Astaire & Crosby but Burke & Van Heusen, who are credited with the writing of special material at the end of the episode. I have thus tentatively entered Burke & Van Heusen as the writers of both numbers.

5. Philco Jingle
The above-shown title for the Philco jingle is entirely my own invention (though based on my listening of its lyrics, of course). The sources at hand gives no title for it, other than "Philco Commercial."


Patter

1. Introduction Of Peggy Lee And Her Participation In The Dialogue
Bing: Look who's here. The writer of Mañana, countless other hits, Peggy Lee. [Audience applause.] Peggy, you know Fred Astaire, don't you?
Peggy: Oh, yeah. I learned the coffee master conga at his dancing school.
Bing: Coffee master conga.
Peggy: Oh, it's terrific. The top part of it stands while the bottom percolates."
Bing: Put the coffee on, honey; I'll be right over.
Fred: Steady, Bing.
Peggy: Gee, Fred, I remember seeing all of your old pictures. How I wish that I could dance like you did.
Fred: Oh, me too; thanks. You know, Bing, I remember all your old pictures. Now I always wish I could sing like you did.
Bing: I wish I could sing like I did, too.
Peggy: Oh, Bing. I think you are singing better now than ever.
Bing: You mean better now than Everett. [n.b. Everett was one of Bing's brothers, and a frequent subject of the show's jokes.]
Fred: I agree with Peggy, Bing. Your voice seems to get more mellow as the years go by. Like good wine, it improves with time.
Bing: Yeah, but every now and then my good wine pops a cork. Hey, but speaking of Fred's pictures, he's done some great ones -- really wonderful pictures. How about those great musicals you made at RKO with Jimmy Durante, hmm?
Peggy: Oh, there were some real gone tunes in those. What do you say we uncork a few?
Fred: Suits me. Hey, Bing, remember Top Hat?
Bing: Remember? Why, they wanted me to make a sequel to it, called ?Satch Hat. Why don't we give the folks a little of the title tune from that movie?

2. Commentary After "Top Hat, White Tie And Tails" And Before "Cheek To Cheek"
Peggy: Grand, grand boys. Hey, Bing, let's go you and me dancing Cheek To Cheek.
Bing: Well, that's not a fair offer. I'm captain of the rowboat. Let's go!

3. Commentary Before "Smoke Gets In Your Eyes"
Bing: Hey, Fred. I don't know about you, Fred, but I'd like to inhale a little oxygen for a minute. I wanna lay back. I wonder if we get Peggy to do Smoke Gets In Your Eyes.
Peggy: How about Smog Gets In Your Eyes In Los Angeles.
Bing: Oh, no, ha, And incidentally Roberta was the musical that introduced Bob Hope to Broadway.
Fred: Also incidentally, Bing, if you remember, I was the fellow who took you to Bob's room and introduced you to him.
Bing: I was thrilled .... then. But I should have known that A Stair would lead to a stew.
Peggy, go smoke screen over this whole thing -- quickly.

4. Dialogue After "White Christmas" And Before "Catalogue Day"
Fred: Berlin really did it that time, didn't he?
Bing: Oh, he does it every time.
Peggy: He sure does. As a songwriter, I wanna lodge a complaint against him.
Fred: What's the matter, Peg?
Peggy: Well, in Holiday Inn Berlin wrote a song for every holiday there is: Christmas, Easter, Thanksgiving, New Year ...
Bing: That's right, Peggy. He also hit Washington's birthday, wrote one for Lincoln's birthday, Fourth of July, Valentine's Day ...
Peggy: He swept the calendar clean!
Bing: That's what you think, Peggy, and that's what Berlin thinks. But Fred and I know differently, don't we, Fred?
Fred: We sure do.
Peggy: What do you mean?
Fred: Well, we did two pictures with Irving, and when he wasn't looking, we wrote some songs about days he overlooked.
Peggy: Oh, don't ?get me, fellows. ?__ never missed a day in a year.
Bing: He did, too, Peggy. And Fred and I got tunes to cover every day he forgot.
Peggy: Those I gotta see.
Fred: Here, Peggy. Take some of our special lyrics.
Peggy: Well, I'll be darned. These are days he forgot.
Bing: Ladies and gentlemen, here is a beautifully sentimental ballad, written by Astaire and Crosby: Catalogue Day.
Peggy: Catalogue Day? Hmm? What's that?
Bing: This gal's never lived in a farm, ?I ?reckon.
Peggy: Heh, heh.


5. Closing Commentary
A jocular mood takes over the participants of this broadcast, especially after The Rhythmaires do some laughter-inducing humming. Most affected of them all is Peggy Lee, who can barely ask the show customary, stock question "who is going to be your guest next week" without cracking up.



Philco Radio Time: The Third Season


The third season of Bing Crosby's Philco Radio Time started on September 29, 1948 and concluded on June 1, 1949. Within that span, a total of 35 episodes were aired. Peggy Lee's appearances throughout the season will be discussed next, episode by episode.

During the preceding summer, producer Bill Morrow had informed the press about his various plans for this season. According to an article published in the July 14, 1948 issue of Variety, Peggy Lee "will be steady feature next season except when femme guests such as Dinah Shore and Dorothy Kirsten are used." The season's prospective scriptwriters are identified as Hal Kanter, Bobby O'Brien, Larry Clemmons, and Izzy Elinson.

Moreover, we are told that "several shows will [possibly] be filmed for video distribution, paralleling the transcription idea for radio. Whether the shows will be lensed simultaneously with the tape recording is still undecided." I do not know if this plan was put into action.

Photos above: two Philco Radio Time ads featuring the show's host, Bing Crosby. These ads are from Life magazine issues published on October 14, 1946 (second image) and January 20, 19467 (third image). I do not know the date for the first ad.


Date: October 27, 1948 (Broadcast Date) (Pre-taped 10/09)
Location: Civic Aditorium, San Francisco, California
Label: Philco Radio Time, Starring Bing Crosby (3rd Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) Love (Your Spell Is Everywhere) - 2:54(Edmund Goulding, Elsie Janis)
Castle Communications Licensed CS/CD(United Kingdom) Mat Mc/Cd 316 — Let There Be Love; The Best Of Peggy Lee   (1994)
Hughes Leisure Group Public Domain CD(Australia/New Zealand) Stb 8849 — Peggy Lee ("20 Golden Greats / Starburst" Series)    (1994)
Castle Communications' Kaz Division Licensed CS/CD(United Kingdom) Trt Mc/Cd Cd 153 — Let There Be Love (TrueTrax Sub-Label)   (1995)
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) You Came A Long Way From St. Louis - 2:30(John Benson Brooks, Bob Russell)
Wisepack's Legends Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Lecd 118 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby ("Legends In Music" Series, Volume 1)    (1994)
Hallmark/Carlton Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Halmcd 303372 — [Bing Crosby] The Radio Years: Bing Crosby & Friends    (1996)
Columbia River/Allegro Public Domain CDCrg 218058 — [Bing Crosby] Duets ("Cocktail Hour" Series)   (2001)
Proper Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) 45 P 1277 1280 — The Peggy Lee Story   (2002)
Riff City Entertainment Public Domain CDCdprga 50290 — [Bing Crosby] Bing And His Gal Pals   (2004)
Both titles on:
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 77 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1948)
Parrot Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Parcd 001 — It's A Good Day {Bing Crosby And Peggy Lee}   (1992)
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 624 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby With Ella Fitzgerald And Peggy Lee, Featuring Fred Astaire   (1997)
Sunflower Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Sun 2108 — El Rancho Grande {Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee}   (2005)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 1224 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   





Photos

First image: Peggy Lee graces the front cover of "Love (Your [Maagic] Spell Is Everywhere)," one of her chosen numbers for this date. This photo of Lee was probably taken in 1948, and is thus contemporaneous with the present broadcast. (Though not included here, Peggy Lee's image can also be found on the front cover of her other number, "You Came A Long Way From St. Louis." That image is from well into the 1950s, and thus not contemporaneous with the present broadcast.)

Third image: a late 1940s postcard view of San Francisco's Civic Auditorium, the venue on which this broadcast was taped.

Second image: Mister Crosby and Mrs. Lee are seen decked in wardrobe suitable for a gala event. Neither the occasion nor the date are known to me, but I suspect that we may be looking at the present broadcast taping, which doubled as a benefit for the Bellarmine Preparatory College Building Fund and the Boys’ Clubs of the Bay Area. William Gargan and William Powell were in attendance as well, fulfilling double duty as guests of not only the Boys' Clubs benefit but also the Bing Crosby broadcast. It was reported that Peggy Lee received $1250 for this appearance in San Francisco. By comparison, Judy Garland was paid $5,000 for an equivalent 1949 taping of an episode in San Francisco, at least according to contemporary press reports. The salary difference serves as an illustration of the huge sums that artists with an established Hollywood career have been perennially able to command. (I should stress that I do not have corroboration for my suspicion, however. The photo of the two singers could stem instead from any other special event in the late 1940s, such as the Los Angeles premiere of the 1950 Crosby movie Mr. Music, on which Lee had a cameo.)


Schedule

According to Crosby chronicler Malcolm Macfarlane, this episode was recorded at the San Francisco Civic Auditorium on Saturday, October 9, as part of a benefit show on behalf of the Boys’ Clubs of the Bay Area and the Bellarmine Preparatory College Building Fund. The show started ad 8:30 p.m. See also Photo notes above. Crosby radio authority Lionel Pairpoint also identifies that Saturday as the day of recording activity.


Personnel

1. Guests
William Powell, William Gargan, and Peggy Lee are billed as the guests for this episode. Violinist Joe Venuti is credited for accompanying Bing Crosby in one number, but is not named among the guests. (Venuti was actually a regular, long-standing member of the show's ensemble, but occasionally he was billed and featured as a guest.)

2. Solos And Duets
Peggy Lee sings "Love, Your Magic Spell Is Everywhere" as a solo, "You Came A Long Way To Saint Louis" in a duet with Crosby.


Songs

1. "You Came A Long Way To Saint Louis"
This playful duet includes additional lyrics in which Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee sing about their respective birthplaces.


Patter

1. Chat With Peggy Lee
2. Preamble And Postscript To "Love, Your Magic Spell Is Everywhere"
Bing: Tonight, folks, we welcome a girlfriend of yours, and of mine. She's sort of been playing hooky for my Philco funfest for a time. She's a great singer. Got her own show now for Chesterfield. As far as we are concerned, we always buy Peggy Lee. Purr something into the mike, Peggy.
Peggy: Hi, Bing.
Bing: Peggy, you -- you've changed. There's something different.
Peggy: Well, sure, Bing, I had a new coiffure.
Bing: Yeah, and you had your hair cut, too.
Peggy: Ha, hah, ha.
Bing: Very soigné.
Peggy: Well, thank you. Ha, ha ha.
Bing: Now, if you've got a real mellow tune for us c'est soir, hmm?
Peggy: Well, I thought I might do Love, Your Magic Spell Is Everywhere.
Bing: Oh, I'm gonna pull the chaise lounge and get spellbound out of this American country.
After Peggy Lee finishes singing the tune, and while the audience applauds, the host has a few more words to add.
Bing: Very sweet, Peggy. Very fine. Lovely arrangement. Thank you, Peggy.

3. Gay Nineties Sketch
4. Preamble To "You Came A Long Way From Saint Louis"
In this episode's sketch, Bing Crosby and William Powell are "gay young blades" vying for the affections of Miss Peggy Lee Gargin, daughter of police officer William Gargin. The events take place in the 1890s. The youngsters visit Miss Gargin at her home in Telegraph Hill, overlooking the San Francisco Bay.
Peggy: Good evening, gentlemen.
William: Good evening. May I kiss your hand?
Peggy: Well, of course.
Bing: You know, Peggy, I was, uh ... Peggy. Peggy!! ... Why, that blundering Powell caught her square in the mouth.
Peggy: You sure has nice friends, Mr. Crosby.
Bing: Gee, Peggy, remember last night when I harked the buggie and a team of horses and how I headed them into the woods and how we were parked there for over an hour?
Peggy: Yes, and I didn't even notice the time, with all that kissing going on.
Bing: Me neither. Those two horses sure were in love with each other. [Audience laughter.] You know, watching them made me think of you and me. Why don't we be like them and get hitched?
Peggy: Well, I've thought a lot about marrying you, Mr. Crosby, but now that I've met Mr. Powell, I've changed.
Bing: I don't understand.
William: That's because you are not a woman. [Audience laughter.] My dear Miss Peggy, it would be an honor indeed to have your hand in marriage. Think how happy we could be together. You and I on a bicycle built for two. And maybe someday, we'll build a bicycle for three.
Peggy: And what if we added a little seat before?
William: I figure that I oughtta have some place to put my feet while you are peddling."
Bing: I guess is up to you to choose between us, Peggy.
Peggy: Oh, but that's not for me to decide. You must ask my father.
The sketch continues with the appearance of Gaugin, who has already promised her daughter's hand to an Irish boy, and who does not want her to marry a singer such as Bing or an actor such as Dick. Bing retorts that Peggy herself is a singer, and that she "sings mighty pretty." He then asks Peggy to demonstrate, and the two proceed to sing "You Came A Long Way From Saint Louis." There is no follow-up after the song; the sketch is left unfinished. (That is to say, we do not find out the decision made by Peggy's father, in regard to the winner of her daughter's hand.)

5. Closing remarks: Upcoming Guests
Peggy: What happens next week, Bing?
Bing: Next week, Peg, you are going to be with us.
Peggy: Well, thank you.
Bing: And also we'll have Charlie McCarthy and Mortimer Snerd. It should be quite a show.
Lee and the other guests then proceed to protest and demand that Edgar Bergen be invited to the next show as well. (Charlie McCarthy and Mortimer Snerd are Edgar Bergen characters.) The following week, Edgar Bergen indeed appears in the show, as previously announced, but Peggy Lee does not. We enjoy her return on the episode after the next one, though.


Date: November 10, 1948 (Broadcast Date) (Pre-taped, Date Unknown)
Location: Hollywood, California
Label: Philco Radio Time, Starring Bing Crosby (3rd Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Loring "Red" Nichols (c), Perry Botkin, Jr. (g), Edwin "Buddy" Cole (p), Joe Venuti (vn), Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) What Is This Thing Called Love? - 1:43(Cole Porter)
Magic/Submarine Collectors' Label LP(United Kingdom) Awe 1 — [Bing Crosby] Bing's Magic   (1980)
Parrot Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Parcd 001 — It's A Good Day {Bing Crosby And Peggy Lee}   (1992)
Castle Communications Licensed CS/CD(United Kingdom) Mat Mc/Cd 316 — Let There Be Love; The Best Of Peggy Lee   (1994)
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) Exactly Like You - 1:19(Jimmy McHugh, Dorothy Fields)
US Government's "American Red Cross 1949 Campaign" 16" Transcription Disc1-2 — [Bing Crosby] The American Red Cross Presents The Bing Crosby Show   (1949)
Magic/Submarine Collectors' Label LP(United Kingdom) Awe 1 — [Bing Crosby] Bing's Magic   (1980)
Parrot Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Parcd 001 — It's A Good Day {Bing Crosby And Peggy Lee}   (1992)
c. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) I Got Rhythm - 1:45(George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin)
Parrot Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Parcd 001 — It's A Good Day {Bing Crosby And Peggy Lee}   (1992)
Wisepack's Legends Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Lecd 118 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby ("Legends In Music" Series, Volume 1)    (1994)
Wisepack Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Lecdd 641 — [Bing Crosby] Presenting Bing Crosby & Nat King Cole ("The Essential Collection" Series)    (1995)
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 624 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby With Ella Fitzgerald And Peggy Lee, Featuring Fred Astaire   (1997)
Rajon's RedX Entertainment Public Domain CD(Australia) Rxbox 31034 — [Bing Crosby] The Great Bing Crosby   (2001)
Broadway Intermission Collectors' Label LPBr 111 — [Bing Crosby] Crosbyana    
d. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) They Can't Take That Away From Me - 2:16(George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin)
Sunflower Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Sun 2108 — El Rancho Grande {Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee}   (2005)
Broadway Intermission Collectors' Label LPBr 111 — [Bing Crosby] Crosbyana    
All titles on:
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 79 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1948)
New Century Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Ncd 07042 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby Shows, Volume Three ("American Radio Revivals" Series)   (2011)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 2140 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   





Photos

The Smokin' Hot Piper Series, continued (part Xi). First: front cover of Radio Guide magazine (September 1936 issue), featuring Bing next to some suspect-looking plants and smoking something that (shocker!) is neither a pipe nor a cigar. Blame it on the weeds -- or the illustrator. Second: front cover of Look magazine, January 17, 1950 issue.


Personnel & Cross-references

1. Guests
At the opening of the show, announcer Ken Carpenter identifies this episode's guests as "Oscar Levant, Peggy Lee, Red Nichols, Joe Venuti, and Ziggy Elman." Note that, in terms of featured players and performances (specifically, the song medley to be itemized below), this episode offers a sequel to the one broadcast on February 11, 1948.


Schedule

Neither of my two main Crosby sources, Malcolm Macfarlane and Lionel Pairpoint, have specifics to give about this show's taping or recording. Pairpoint does note that "[a]lthough the Rhythmaires and Ziggy Elman are mentioned in the credits, the Rhythmaires’ presence cannot be detected in any of the vocal items and, unusually for a listed ‘guest’, there is no further acknowledgement of Ziggy Elman’s presence." I suspect that the contents of this show were, to a large degree, holdover material, recorded much earlier, perhaps as alternate performances. In that regard, recall the aforementioned existence of a similar medley to the one performed here, dating back to February 11, 1948.


Songs

1. Medley
In this episode, all the numbers which feature Peggy Lee happen to be part of an 11-song medley. As with previous medleys, the songs are limited to about one chorus each. Here are the numbers and their performers:

Wildflower, I Love You - Bing Crosby (with Oscar Levant on piano)
Look For The Silver Lining - Bing Crosby (with Oscar Levant on piano)
Take Me Back To Manhattan - Oscar Levant (vocal & piano, solo)
What Is This Thing Called Love? - Peggy Lee (with orchestra members)
Mandy - Bing Crosby (with Oscar Levant)
Exactly Like You - Bing Crosby & Peggy Lee (with orchestra members)
You Are Too Beautiful - Bing Crosby (with orchestra members)
Blame It On My Youth - Bing Crosby (with Oscar Levant on piano)
Lady, Play Your Mandolin - Bing Crosby (with Oscar Levant on piano)
I Got Rhythm - Bing Crosby & Peggy Lee (with Buddy Cole, Perry Botkin Jr, Red Nichols, and Joe Venuti, all of whom Crosby credits by first name; my listing of Ziggy Elman among players backing Lee should be deemed tentative, since he is not credited in this number nor in her other others)
[The medley is then interrupted by a Philco commercial. After the commercial, the medley ends with the addition of just one more song.]
They Can’t Take That Away From Me - Bing Crosby & Peggy Lee


Patter

1. Peggy Lee's Contribution To The Dialogue
Bing Crosby's chat with Oscar Levant includes various jokes at the expense of Al Jolson. Pianist Levant claims that his boss Jolson has retired to Shangri-La, which he identifies as a monastery in Tibet. Crosby asks if Jolson still keeps up with his son, Al Jolson, Jr., who is supposedly substituting for him on the Kraft show. (This was most likely just a joke. The adopted child would have turned 18 this year, but Jolson is said to have fully stopped contact with him after his 1940 divorce from Ruby Keeler.)
Oscar: Certainly. Every week he sends a flock of ducks to pick up the kid's paycheck.
Bing: He's in touch.
Bing: Why, Oscar, here's Peggy Lee.
[Audience applause.]
Peggy: Hi, fellows.
Bing: Peggy, Oscar and I were just talking about the original Al Jolson.
Peggy: Oh, well, I never knew him. But I know his son quite well.
Bing: You do?
Peggy: Yes, I was over at his house for a duck dinner last night."
Bing: The kid revolted, huh?
Oscar: Good for him and good for us, too. Shall we go on now with something charming?
Bing: As you wish, Oscar. Let's say, for instance, you, Peggy and I hit some tunes that we hope will bring back a few pleasant memories to our listeners, hmm?
Oscar: Sure.
Bing: What will we do? Some oldies?
Oscar: No, we'll do some 'antiquies.'
Bing: Antiquies.
Oscar: They were before oldies. Remember this one?
The men then launch into the medley's first number.



Issues

1. Educated Guesses
Please notice that, in the case of CDs that I do not own, I have had to make educated guesses as to which versions of certain songs they contain. The songs from this radio program offer particular difficulty, because Peggy and Bing Crosby sang most of them in multiple broadcasts. To determine which versions have been commercially released, I have naturally listened to the issues that I do have, and have then made educated guesses on the remaining issues. Corrections will be very welcome.

Take, for instance, the case of this session's version of "What Is This Thing Called Love?" I can vouch for the accurate placement of the following issues, to which I have listened:
Magic/Submarine LP: Bing's Magic (1980)
Parrot CD: It's A Good Day {Bing Crosby And Peggy Lee} (1992)
Castle's / TrueTrax CD: Let There Be Love; The Best Of Peggy Lee (1994)
Platinum/Start Entertainments CD: Peggy Lee ("The Platinum Collection" Series) (1997)
Snapper/Recall CD: Linger (2000)
Sunflower CD: El Rancho Grande {Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee} (2005)

On the other hand, I have made educated guesses as to the version of "What Is This Thing Called Love?" that appears in the following issues:
Hughes Leisure Group CD: Peggy Lee ("20 Golden Greats / Starburst" Series) (1994)
Pickwick International's Hallmark CD: Peggy Lee Gold (Hallmark's Series) (1995)
Janda CD: The Lady Is A Tramp ("Platinum Collection" Series) (1996)
Golden Options CD: Fever [also issued as Let's Do It, minus 2 tracks] (1998)
Magic / Submarine CD: It's Magic (2007)

Some guesses and arguments are easier to make than others, of course. Take, for instance, the above-listed 2007 Magic/Submarine CD. Since it is essentially a digital reissue of the LP that the same label released in 1980 (a LP that I do have, and which I have also listed above), I feel reasonably confident that both issues include the same version of the song.


Date: December 1, 1948 (Broadcast Date) (Pre-taped, Date Unknown)
Location: Hollywood, California
Label: Philco Radio Time, Starring Bing Crosby (3rd Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Bing Crosby, Bob Crosby, Peggy Lee (v), Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires {Conlon, Mack McLean, Loulie "Lily" Jean Norman, Charles Parlato, Gloria Wood} (bkv)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) On A Slow Boat To China - 2:08(Frank Loesser)
Reader's Digest Licensed LPRda 4 138 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Sings Again   (1980)
GNP Crescendo Collectors' Label 8-track/CS/LPGnp 9046 — [Bing Crosby] The Radio Years, Volume 2   (1985)
GNP Crescendo Collectors' Label CDGnpd 9052 — [Bing Crosby] The Radio Years   (1987)
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) A Little Bird Told Me - 2:43(Harvey O. Brooks)
Jasmine Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Jascd 651 — [Bing Crosby] The Crosby Brothers; Bing & Bob   (2006)
Both titles on:
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 82 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1948)
Sunflower Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Sun 2108 — El Rancho Grande {Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee}   (2005)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 2141 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   






Photos

The Smokin' Hot Piper Series, continued (part XII). First: front cover of Radio Album magazine, summer 1948 issue. Third: front cover of the New York Herald Tribune's TV And Radio Magazine, March 4-10, 1956 issue. Fourth and second: the publicity shot used by those magazine covers. Date unknown, but obviously no later than mid-1948.


Schedule

Neither of my two main Crosby sources, Malcolm Macfarlane and Lionel Pairpoint, have specifics to give about this show's taping or recording.


Personnel

1. Guests
"This is Ken Carpenter, welcoming you to Philco Radio Time, produced and transcribed in Hollywood, with John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra, Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires, and Bing's guests Peggy Lee, Kathy Crosby, and Bob Crosby. And now here's my friend, Kathy Crosby's uncle, Bob Crosby's brother, and Peggy Lee's music rag, Bing Crosby!"

2. Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires
This group is heard in "A Little Birdie Told Me" only.

3. Peggy Lee Solos And Duets
No solos are performed by Peggy Lee in this episode. "On A Small Boat To China" is a Lee-Crosby duet. "A Little Bird Told Me" is a trio, the third partner being guest Bob Crosby. Both of these numbers would be reprised in the next broadcast (December 8, 1948), the latter one as a duet (i.e., sans Bob Crosby).


Patter

1. Introduction To Peggy Lee And Preamble To "On A Slow Boat To China"
Bing: One of the brightest luminaries in song circles these days is a frequent visitor to Philco Radio Time. She chants for Chesterfield, and every so often writes a hit too, with Dave Barbour. It's always a pleasure to greet the beautiful blonde from North Dakota, Miss Peggy Lee.
[Audience applause.]
Peggy: Hello again, Bing!
Bing: Uh-ah; you can't say hello again: that's Jack Benny's opening line.
Peggy: Oh! Ha, I'm sorry. Well, could I say, helll-o everybody?
Bing: Can't ?say ?this line; you want to hear from Ted Collins, hmm?
Peggy: [Chuckles.] Looks like I'm trapped, Bing. Goodbyyyye.
Bing: That's [Jerry] Colonna!. So long, so long now. Where are you going anyhow?
Peggy: I'm taking A Slow Boat To China.
Bing: Well, wait till I flip into my mandarin coat and I'll join you.

2. Preamble To "A Little Bird Told Me"
Peggy: Alright, boys. Break it up, break it up.
Bing: Hi, Peggy. You know my brother, don't you?
Bob: Sure she does. Hi, Peg!
Peggy: Hey, Bob, you and Bing look quite a bit alike. Are you really blood brothers?
Bob: Why, sure we are, except his blood is richer than mine.
Bing: Peggy, you and Bob have something in common: you both have daughters.
Peggy: That's right, Bing. But my Nicki doesn't sing; she's too young.
Bing: What do you mean, too young? When I started singing I was only 11 months old.
Peggy: Eleven months?!
Bob: Sure! That's why he sings the way he does today. A whole spoonful of pablum got stuck down his throat.
Peggy: Ha, ha. Bob, sometimes you sound a lot like Bing, you know.
Bing: Spoon and all got stuck in his throat. Pablum too.
Peggy: Ha, ha. Well, as long as the three of us are standing here, Bing, why don't we try singing together, hmm?
Bing: I'm game as Truman. How about you, Bob?
Bob: I'm game as Doctor Gallup! If we make it sound good, Bing, we may get a 15-minute program of its own.
Bob: If we don't make it good, Philco may cut this one down to 15 -- or a fast 5 or something.
Peggy: Hey, you fellows heard the song about a little bird?
Bing: A Little Birdie Told Me?
Peggy: Yeah.
Bing: Evelyn Knight and The Stardusters does this. Got a smashing disc cut out for Decca. Who's gonna start it?
Peggy: Johnny Trotter. Let's take some and leave some.
Bing: Good enough. John, start the music.
Bob: That's a good idea for a radio program: 'start the music'.
Peggy: Ha, ha.


Issues

1. Educated Guesses
2. "On A Slow Boat To China"
Please note that, in the case of CDs that I do not own, I have had to make educated guesses as to which versions of certain songs they contain. From this broadcast, the duet "On A Slow Boat To China" offers particular difficulty. Peggy Lee and Bing Crosby sang it on this broadcast and then again, for a second time, on the next broadcast. Though very similar, there are definitive differences between the two versions -- most notably, Bing's addition of the word "honey" to only one of the two takes. Both versions have been released on various CDs. Unfortunately, I have listened to only a few of the issues that I have tentatively listed under this session's performances of "On A Slow Boat To China." I can vouch for the accuracy of the releases on GNP, Redmond Nostalgia, and Sunflower. All the other items that are listed under this performance should be considered educated guesses which could turn out to be wrong (i.e., they could contain the version from the next session, rather than this session's version).


Date: December 15, 1948 (Broadcast Date) (Pre-taped, Date Unknown)
Location: Hollywood, California
Label: Philco Radio Time, Starring Bing Crosby (3rd Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee (v), Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires {Conlon, Mack McLean, Loulie "Lily" Jean Norman, Charles Parlato, Gloria Wood} (bkv)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) A Little Bird Told Me - 1:36(Harvey O. Brooks)
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) Then I'll Be Happy (I Wanna Go Where You Go, Do What You Do) - 1:36(Lew Brown, Sidney Clare, Cliff Friend)
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 549 — I've Got A Crush On You   (1995)
Sunflower Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Sun 2108 — El Rancho Grande {Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee}   (2005)
Avid Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Avc 876 — Peggy Lee ("The Essential Collection" Series)    (2007)
c. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) On A Slow Boat To China - 2:00(Frank Loesser)
Hallmark/Carlton Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Halmcd 303372 — [Bing Crosby] The Radio Years: Bing Crosby & Friends    (1996)
Proper Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) 45 P 1277 1280 — The Peggy Lee Story   (2002)
Avid Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Avc 876 — Peggy Lee ("The Essential Collection" Series)    (2007)
Sounds Of Yesteryear Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Dsoy 9003 — [Bing Crosby] Love Is ...   (2012)
All titles on:
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 84 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1948)
Parrot Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Parcd 001 — It's A Good Day {Bing Crosby And Peggy Lee}   (1992)
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 624 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby With Ella Fitzgerald And Peggy Lee, Featuring Fred Astaire   (1997)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 1225 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   





Photos

The Smokin' Hot Piper Series, continued (part XIII). First: front cover of Billboard magazine, July 13, 1940 issue. Second: front cover of Life magazine, October 7, 1946 issue.


Schedule

Neither of my two main Crosby sources, Malcolm Macfarlane and Lionel Pairpoint, have specifics to give about this show's rehearsal and taping.


Personnel

1. Guests
Ken Carpenter identifies the episode's guests as Bob Hope and "Miss Peggy Lee."

2. Peggy Lee Solos And Duets
"I Wanna Go Where You Go (Then I'll Be Happy)" is a Peggy Lee solo. It is also the first of her two performances of the number in Bing Crosby's radio shows. The second performance, from the February 23, 1949 episode, is actually a duet with Crosby.

The other two numbers listed above are duets by Crosby and Lee. Both duets are reprises: they had been performed in the previous broadcast. (In the case of "A LIttle Bird Told Me," the earlier broadcast was a trio, the third partner having been Bob Crosby.)


Issues

1. Educated Guesses
2. "On A Slow Boat To China"
Please note that, in the case of CDs that I do not own, I have had to make educated guesses as to which versions of certain songs they contain. From this episode, the duet "On A Slow Boat To China" presents some difficulty. Peggy Lee and Bing Crosby sang the number not only on this episode but also on the previous one. Though very similar, there are definitive differences between the versions -- most notably, Bing's addition of the word "honey" to only one of the two takes. Both versions have been released on various CDs. I can vouch for the accuracy of all the issues listed under this session's version "On A Slow Boat To China;" I have verified that none contains the version from the previous session. (Conversely, I cannot guarantee that all the issues listed under the earlier "On A Slow Boat To China" contain that version, instead of this one.)


Patter

1. Reliability of Transcripts
My only aural source for this particular broadcast is a very, very poor-sounding MP3 file. As a result, plenty of dialogue turned out to be inaudible to me -- and some words or phrases that I could have transcribed incorrectly, too.

2. Peggy Lee's Contributions To The Episode's Banter
During Bing Crosby's chat with Ken Carpenter, the host mentions that he has been supplementing his income moonlighting as a Santa Claus during the holidays.
Ken: Oh, look who's here, Bing.
Bing: Peggy Lee. Hiya, Peg.
Peggy: Hi, boys.
Bing: Hey, Peggy, you sure were busy Christmas shopping at the farmer's market yesterday.
Peggy: How do you know? Did you see me?
Bing: See you? I was Santa Claus. You sat on my lap.
Peggy; Oh, that's the lap I sat on.
Bing: Yes, and don't think I didn't appreciate it.
Peggy: Hmm - ha ha.
Bob: Look, Peggy, it's none of my business, but honestly you are a pretty big girl to oughtta be sitting on Santa Claus' lap.
Bing: She oughtta sit where she wants to.
Bing: Would you care to join The Rhythmaires and me in something softly and good?
Peggy: Sure would.
Crosby makes a few more comments before he and Lee finally launch into A Little Bird Told Me.

3. Introduction To "I Wanna Go Where You Go"
Bing: "Comes now Peggy Lee with a great old timer. ?Bounce ?it, Peg."

4. Preamble And Postscript To "On A Slow Boat To China"
Bing: Right now, about, you'll have to excuse me for a minute because Peggy Lee and I are gonna do a stylish duo, On A Slow Boat To China.
Bob Hope: What are am I gonna do while you are singing?
Bing: You can sit down and relax.
Bob: Do you ever do that?
Bob: No, how does it go?
Peggy: Hi, Bob, Bing.
After one more line from Peggy and another from Bing, the host and the female guest sing their duet. Once they are finished, Hope briefly jokes about their performance, saying that it was "sung by ?Pingboat Lee and Tugboat Crosby."

5. Closing Banter
Bing: Well, that about ?wraps it, My thanks to Bob Hope and Peggy Lee for joining our little group tonight.
Peggy: I enjoyed it very much, Bing.
Bing: I enjoyed you, Peggy. I hope you enjoyed yourself, too. I'm feeling so close to Christmas I'd like you, Peggy ___.
A bit later on, Crosby and Hope talk about their plans to go out together after midnight, and Peggy asks if she can go along with them. The men's responses include joking about how she's "got her own money" and "is loaded," now that she's "got her own show for Chesterfield."


Date: December 29, 1948 (Broadcast Date) (Pre-taped, 12/13)
Location: Hollywood, California
Label: Philco Radio Time, Starring Bing Crosby (3rd Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Perry Botkin, Jr. (g), Phil Stevens (b), Joe Venuti (vn), Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires {Conlon, Mack McLean, Loulie "Lily" Jean Norman, Charles Parlato, Gloria Wood}, Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) Cuánto Le Gusta (La Parranda) - 1:55(Gabriel Ruiz Galindo, Ray Gilbert)
Murray Hill Collectors' Label LP894637 — [Bing Crosby] The Murray Hill Radio Theatre Presents Bing Crosby And Friends   (1976)
DECCA©MCA Victor LP(Japan) 9301 4 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby Radio Show   (1977)
HRB Music Collectors' Label LPBcp 1001 — [Bing Crosby] HRB Music Proudly Presents Bing Crosby And Friends   (1977)
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) I Got Lucky In The Rain - 2:12(Harold Adamson, Jimmy McHugh)
US Government's "American Red Cross 1949 Campaign" 16" Transcription Disc1-2 — [Bing Crosby] The American Red Cross Presents The Bing Crosby Show   (1949)
Castle Communications Licensed CS/CD(United Kingdom) Mat Mc/Cd 316 — Let There Be Love; The Best Of Peggy Lee   (1994)
Hughes Leisure Group Public Domain CD(Australia/New Zealand) Stb 8849 — Peggy Lee ("20 Golden Greats / Starburst" Series)    (1994)
c. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) Maybe You'll Be There - 2:17(Rube Bloom, Sammy Gallop)
Magic/Submarine Collectors' Label LP(United Kingdom) Awe 1 — [Bing Crosby] Bing's Magic   (1980)
Wisepack's Legends Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Lecd 119 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby ("Legends In Music" Series, Volume 2)    (1995)
Delta's LaserLight Digital Licensed CD12641 — Miss Peggy Lee ("Some Of The Best" Series)   (1996)
On The Air/Blaricum Collectors' Label CS/CD(Netherlands) Ota 401978/101978 — [Bing Crosby] Great Moments With Bing Crosby And Friends, From The Radio Shows    (1997)
Magic/Submarine Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Dsoy 746 — [Bing Crosby] It's Magic   (2007)
All titles on:
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 86 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time    (1948)
Parrot Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Parcd 001 — It's A Good Day {Bing Crosby And Peggy Lee}   (1992)
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 624 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby With Ella Fitzgerald And Peggy Lee, Featuring Fred Astaire   (1997)
HLC CDHlc 6649 — [Bing Crosby] On The Air; Bing Crosby & Peggy Lee   (2000)
Sunflower Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Sun 2108 — El Rancho Grande {Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee}   (2005)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 2142 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   






Photos

The Smokin' Hot Piper Series, continued. Part XIV. In which Bing teaches us that reading with a pipe is fundamental (be it a radio script or a music score). So is having your own ready-to-wear plaid shirt collection, ably accessorized with hats of all straws and stripes.


Schedule

The episode's date of recording (Monday, December 13) is given by both of my main Crosby sources (chronicler Malcolm Macfarlane, radio authority Lionel Pairpoint). No rehearsal date is given by either expert.


Personnel And Songs

1. Guests
Near the start of the program, Ken Carpenter announces that the guests will be Peggy Lee and The Mills Brothers. "Peggy Lee and The Mill...?!," exclaims Bing, "Holy smoke. Our show tonight oughtta be jumpier than a bullfrog on a pogo stick."

2. Perry Botkin, Sr. (guitar)
3. Phil Stevens (bass)
4. Joe Venuti (violin)
Bing Crosby credits the above-listed musicians as the trio that accompanies him in his solo rendition of "Tea For Two." That Crosby solo is the only performance for which the players are identified. Therefore, the trio's inclusion in this session's personnel should be deemed tentative: the bassist and the guitarist are just presumed (not confirmed) to have also played behind Peggy Lee during her numbers. However, I am excluding Joe Venuti because I have not been able to identify a violin among the instruments playing behind Lee's three performances.

5. Solos and Duets
"Cuánto Le Gusta" and "Maybe You'll Be There" are Crosby-Lee duets. As for her solo, this is the first of two Peggy Lee performances of "I Got Lucky In The Rain" in Bing Crosby's show. The second performance, from the January 26, 1949 episode is actually a duet with Crosby, unlike the one from this date.

6. Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires
For their duet performance of this song, Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee receive heavy backing from the 4-member group The Rhythmaires.

7. Ken Carpenter
Bing Crosby mentions that Ken Carpenter has just done his 2000th broadcast.


Patter

1. Peggy Lee's Contribution To The Dialogue
Bing: Say, Ken. Peggy Lee is here. You are early, Peg.
Peggy: Hi, Bing, Ken. Was Santa Claus nice to you, boys?
Ken: Oh, ho, I did great.
Bing: I scored lightly. Trixie got me a wonderful electric sleeping bag for pack trips.
Peggy: Electric sleeping bag, eh?
Bing: Yes.
Ken: Say, how can you plug an electric sleeping bag when you are way back in the woods?
Bing: No plug. A very clever cat comes with this bag. You stroke its back and it generates your own electricity. Wonderful thing.
Further patter along the same lines is exchanged among the thee individuals, until Carpenter finally asks the other two to sing, and Crosby lets us know that they will start with the 'musical Berlitz' "Cuánto Le Gusta."

2. Introduction To "I Got Lucky In The Rain"
Crosby explains: "Mike Todd has a new Broadway musical that is a big hit. I'm glad but I'm not surprised because with Bobby Clark in it and such songs as the one that Peggy Lee brings us now it's only understandable. Peggy! [The latter is an exhortation for Lee to start.]" After Peggy Lee finishes her rendition, and while the audience is still applauding, Bing adds, "ah, swell, Peggy, swell."

3. Introduction To "Maybe You'll Be There"
"Peggy and I are ready with a current hit," says Crosby. The duo then tackles "Maybe You'll Be There."

4. Closing Remarks
Peggy: Who's with you next week, Bing?
Bing: Next week, Peggy, Betty Grable, who looks like Philco's new table radio phonograph, will be here.
Peggy: Well, you've got a table or you're gonna hold her on your lap?
Bing: [seeming to ignore Peggy's question, and eliciting audience laughter] "Alllso Harry James will be here.
Peggy: Ooh. I seeee what you mean. [n.b. At this point in time, Gable was married to James.]
Bing: Good night, folks, and a Happy New Year from Philco and all of us. Thank you.


Issues

1. The American Red Cross' 1949 Fund Campaign Presents The Bing Crosby Show [Transcription Disc]
2. Red Cross Programs [CD]
Because I have not listened to either of the above-listed issues, I can only tentatively assume that they contain this broadcast's version of "I Got Lucky In The Rain." Alternatively, these items could contain the version sung on the January 26, 1949 broadcast, to be discussed below.


Date: January 12, 1949 (Broadcast Date) (Pre-taped, Date Unknown)
Location: Hollywood, California
Label: Philco Radio Time, Starring Bing Crosby (3rd Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee, Johnny Mercer (v)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) Trouble Is A Man - 2:55(Alec Wilder)
Demand Performance Collectors' Label cassetteDpc 707 — The Unforgettable Peggy Lee   (1985)
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 549 — I've Got A Crush On You   (1995)
Sunflower Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Sun 2108 — El Rancho Grande {Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee}   (2005)
Avid Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Avc 876 — Peggy Lee ("The Essential Collection" Series)    (2007)
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) On A Slow Mule To Memphis And Macon - 2:00(Frank Loesser, Johnny Mercer)
Both titles on:
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 88 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1949)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 2143 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   





Photos

The Smokin' Hot Piper Series, continued. Part XV. Also continued: the Reading Smoker sub-series.


Schedule

Neither of my two main Crosby sources, Malcolm Macfarlane and Lionel Pairpoint, have specifics to give about this show's rehearsal and taping.


Personnel

1. Guests
Ken Carpenter announces this episode's guests as "Johnny Mercer, the songbird from Savannah, and Peggy Lee, the North Dakota nightingale." (Carpenter then proceeds to call Bing Crosby "the Spokane sparrow.")

2. Peggy Lee Solos
For her solo spot, Peggy Lee tackles "Trouble Is A Man." The other above-listed number is a trio, featuring Crosby, Lee, and Mercer.


Songs And Songwriters

1. "On A Small Mule To Memphis And Macon"
A parody of the novelty hit "On A Slow Boat To China," this song is not identified by title during the broadcast, and there are no other known known versions of it. The title "On A Small Mule To Memphis And Macon" is actually my own invention -- an educated guest of mine. As will be seen below, this song is part of the episode's comic sketch; a bit of interspersed dialogue has been factored into the timing indicated above.

2. Johnny Mercer
My crediting of guest Johnny Mercer for the parodic lyric "On A Small Mule To Memphis And Macon" should be deemed tentative. It is based on indirect, collateral evidence. (Collateral: the episode also includes a new set of lyrics for "Small Fry." Before Crosby and Mercer sing those lyrics, the host's commentary suggests that his guest wrote them.)


Patter

1. Introduction Of Peggy Lee And Preamble To "Trouble Is A Man"
Bing: The first of our charming guests is certainly no stranger to frequent followers of Phlico's fest roster. By now, she is more a member of our family than just a casual dropper-inner. This of course can only mean the duteous Chesterfield chantoose Miss Peggy Lee.
Peggy: Hi Bing. [audience applause]
Bing: Good evening, Peggy, and how are things going over on the Chesterfield show?
Peggy: Oh, just fine, Bing. Cigarettes, anyone?
[Audience laughter.]
Bing: Take a pack of Philcos! What's your big number tonight, Peg?
Peggy: Well, I thought I might go a little torchy tonight, Bing, and sing Trouble Is A Man.
Bing: In that case, I shall light your torch and sob softly in the corner while you sing.
Peggy: Well, if you are gonna sob, please sob on key, eh?
Bing: It should be strictly contrapuntal sobbing tonight. John Scott, Miss Lee awaits your downbeat.
After Peggy finishes singing and as the audience applauds, Bing adds: "Oh, that was sheer enchantment, Peggy. Now dry your eyes and report back later, hmm?"

2. Sketch: A Mountain Life Love Story
The episode's sketch is a "steering drama" of mountain life that takes place in the hill country of Georgia.
Johnny: I'm Johnny Mercer, a simple mountain boy.
Peggy: I'm Peggy Lee, a simple mountain girl.
John Scott Trotter: I'm Old Pappy Trotter, a simple mountain.
Bing: I'm Bing Crosby; I'm simple.
After a bit more of that type of presentational banter, the action starts.
John [Peggy's grandfather]: Peggy, what's the idea of hanging our cow on the clothes line?
Peggy: Welll, that ain't the cow. That's young doctor Malone's rubber gloves! I wonder where my boyfriends are.
[Knocks are heard on the door.]
Peggy: Come in.
Bing: I'm in.
[A clanging sound is heard.]
John: Bing, what are you wearing on your feet?
Bing: Horse shoes.
Peggy: Horse shoes?!
Bing: Yeah, I took a mule down the blacksmith's shop and they were having an one cent sale and I paid an extra penny and I got 4 more shoes.
Peggy: Well, you are only wearing two. Where's the other two?
Bing: You oughtta ?handle 'em when I sit down!
John: Well, what are we waiting for. Why don't we eat?
Peggy: We oughtta wait for Johnny Mercer.
John: He can't eat. He ain't got no teeth.
Peggy: He has now. I whittled him myself.
John: You oughtta see him. He has the prettiest n_____ smile you ever saw.
[Knocks are heard again.]
Johnny: Hi, Peggy. Can I have a kiss?
Peggy: Okay, baby, dokey.
[Sound of a kiss.]
Johnny: "Wow, what a kiss. Look at the teeth you whittled. Charcoal.
The sketch continues with a bit more banter among Crosby, Mercer, Trotter, and Lee. Then there's the introduction of Ken Carpenter, yet another suitor. Peggy eventually goes on to lament that she doesn't know who to marry, peppering her lament with a string of southern interjections. Bing's plea on his own behalf involves the singing of the parodic song "On A Small Mule To Memphis." Peggy joins him half way through. A second plea-in-song comes from Johnny, who sings "On A Small Mule To Macon;" once again, Peggy joins halfway through. The three main characters end up singing one final chorus of the song, as they take a ride together on the same mule to Memphis. This ending basically leaves the matter of choosing a suitor unsolved, thereby opening up the narrative to the implication that poligamy might be in Peggy's future. (Bing comments that she can marry them both.)


Date: January 26, 1949 (Broadcast Date) (Pre-taped 1/03)
Location: Studio B, NBC West Coast Radio City, Hollywood, California
Label: Philco Radio Time, Starring Bing Crosby (3rd Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), A. J. Cicerone, George Hall, Alex Massey, John "Jack" Mayhew, Paul Rosen, George Smith (r), Robert "Bobby" Guy, Earl Penny (t), Lou McGarity, Willard Spencer (tb), Loring "Red" Nichols (c), Ted Bergren, Perry Botkin, Jr. (g), James Moore, Israel "Izzy" Rosenbaum (sb), Edwin "Buddy" Cole (p), Nick Fatool (d), Walter Borella, Frank Houser, Joseph Maita, Mischa Novy, Mayer Oberman, C. Russo (vn), Melvin Bandel (vc), Abe Burrows, Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) So Dear To My Heart - 2:12(Ticker Freeman, Irving Taylor)
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 549 — I've Got A Crush On You   (1995)
Avid Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Avc 876 — Peggy Lee ("The Essential Collection" Series)    (2007)
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) I Got Lucky In The Rain - 1:53(Harold Adamson, Jimmy McHugh)
c. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) When You're In Love With The Lover You Love - 0:49(Abe Burrows)
Sunflower Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Sun 2110 — Just the Way You Are {Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee}   (2005)
d. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) California - 1:43(Abe Burrows)
All titles on:
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 90 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1949)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 2144 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   






Photos

The Smokin' Hot Piper Series, continued. Part XVI. A shocked Bing bears witness to the adage to you can't believe everything you read -- not even in your own autobiography! Next up is our turn to be shocked: Monsieur Crosby reads the 1939 edition of Charles Henderson How To Sing For Money. You too, Bing, in need or a lesson or two?


Schedule

The episode's date of recording (Monday, January 3, 1949) is given by both of my main Crosby sources (chronicler Malcolm Macfarlane, radio authority Lionel Pairpoint). No rehearsal date is given by either expert.


Personnel And Sources

1. Guests
Announcer Ken Carpenter identifies the episode's guests as "Peggy Lee, who sings for Chesterfield, and Abe Burrows, who sings for laughs." (He then adds, "and now, here is Bing Crosby, who sings for the fun of it.")

2. Musicians
3. Ted Bergren
My source for the above-listed personnel is The Red Nichols Story: After Intermission, 1942-1965, written by Philip R. Evans, Stanley Hester, Stephen Hester, and Linda Evans. Under this January 26, 1949 session, the authors note that "neither the contract nor the payroll sheets for this period were located, but the personnel is believed to be" the group of musicians in question.

Notice also that the authors list two guitarists for this broadcast, one of them being the show's regular (Perry Botkin, Sr.) and the other one being Ted Bergren. Under another broadcast (September 21, 1949), Bergren is listed by the authors as the session's librarian or copyist. (Botkin, Sr. is also known to have served a double function on the show. He was not only its guitarist but also its hiring contractor.)

4. Solos and Duets
This is the second of Peggy Lee's two performances of "I Got Lucky In The Rain" in Bing Crosby programming. The first rendition, from the December 29, 1948 broadcast, is actually a solo. In this episode's reprise, she duets with Crosby. "So Dear To My Heart" serves as Peggy Lee's solo for the episode.

"When You’re In Love With The Lover You Love" and "California" are part of a musical sketch that parodies both operettas and westerns. "When You’re In Love With The Lover You Love" is another duet with Crosby, "California" a trio with Abe Burrows. For more details, see the Patter transcribed below.


Patter

1. Introduction Of Peggy Lee And Preamble To "So Dear To My Heart"
Bing: Here once again this evening your guest is your dear friend and ours pretty Peggy Lee. What are you going to chant for us tonight, Peggy?
Peggy: So Dear To My Heart, Bing.
Bing: Heh, you are going to make Mister Disney very happy -- and me, too.

2. Peggy Lee's Banter With Bing Crosby
Bing: Oh, Peg, that was real, real good.
Peggy: Heh, heh, thank you, Bing. Hey, by the way, I have a message for you.
Bing: A message for me?
Peggy: Yeah, I was parked in Mullholland Drive last night ...
[This mention of Mullholland Drive refers back to comments made by Crosby in his earlier patter with Ken Carpenter.]
Bing: Yeah?
Peggy: Yeah, and an owl stuck his head in the car and said, whatever happened to Crosby? [Audience laughter]
Bing: Yeah, whatever happened to him. It's probably one of your lovebirds.
Peggy: Ha ha! Nnoo!
[This sounds like a genuine rather than a scripted reaction; Peggy sounds both tickled and scandalized at the implications -- i.e., the charge that she is among those who habitually park at a well-known lovers' lane in order to carry 'lovebird' affairs.]
Bing: Peggy, I think we better scurry into a tune before too much of my reckless, peckless p____ comes to light here.
Peggy [still sounding genuinely amused]: Ha, ha. Okay, let's do Jimmy McHugh and Harold Adamson's new tune I Got Lucky In The Rain.
Bing: Oh, we could stand a little rain, I guess. John Scott, reach up with your baton and puncture the clouds.

3. The Purple Phantom Sketch
According to guest Abe Burrows, his operetta "takes place in Old California about 78 years ago," and its hero is a Robin Hood-like bandit named the Purple Phantom. Peggy Lee plays Jennifer, the British niece of an earl, with whom she is traveling on a stagecoach. After shooting the coach's driver and hitting the earl, the Phantom kidnaps Jennifer, taking her to the mountains. They fall in love, of course, and their affection is proclaimed through the parodic song "When You’re In Love With The Lover You Love." Serving as the sketch's big finale is a song called "California," described by Burrows as an Oklahoma-type number. The whole sketch greatly amuses the in-studio audience, as well as the participants. (During the singing of the fast-paced "California," Peggy Lee is heard losing her place at one point, in part because of the fun that she is having.)

4. Closing
Bing: I'd like to offer a firm hand and a hearty thank you to Peggy Lee and Abe Burrows for contributing to this evening's concerto.
Peggy: Ha, ha, ha! What happens next week, Bing?
Bing: Well, actually, Peggy, we are being beamed from San Francisco.
Peggy: Uuff.
Abe: Who's gonna be with you, Bing, and should I bring my 'piana?'
Bing: Well, if you do -- if you do, it will be shambles because the mighty Jimmy Durante will be onstage and you knows what he does to a 'pianer.'
Peggy: Well, can you handle Durante alone?
Bing: Not up to it -- not up to it, I'll get our dear girl Gertrude Niesen to assist me.
Peggy: Ha, ha.
Abe: Niesen and Durante? It should be a smash!
Bing: We are going all out.
Peggy: I'll be riveted to my Philco, Bing.
Abe: I'll try to dig it, too, son.
Bing: Thank you. So long, Peggy. So long, Abe. Good night, folks, and thank you very much.


Date: February 23, 1949 (Broadcast Date) (Pre-taped 2/07)
Location: Hollywood, California
Label: Philco Radio Time, Starring Bing Crosby (3rd Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Unknown (g), Milton De Lugg (p), Abe Burrows, Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee (v), Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires {Conlon, Mack McLean, Loulie "Lily" Jean Norman, Charles Parlato, Gloria Wood} (bkv)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) Then I'll Be Happy (I Wanna Go Where You Go, Do What You Do) - 1:46(Lew Brown, Sidney Clare, Cliff Friend)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 94 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1949)
Viper's Nest Collectors' Label CDVn 1003 — [Bing Crosby] Live Duets, 1947-1949   (1996)
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) So In Love - 2:51(Cole Porter)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 94 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1949)
Viper's Nest Collectors' Label CDVn 1003 — [Bing Crosby] Live Duets, 1947-1949   (1996)
Sunflower Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Sun 2108 — El Rancho Grande {Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee}   (2005)
Sepia Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) 1353 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (2020)
c. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) It Means That We Are We - 0:34(Abe Burrows)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 94 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1949)
Sunflower Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Sun 2108 — El Rancho Grande {Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee}   (2005)
d. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) Happy, Happy, Happy Days - 0:43(Abe Burrows)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 94 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1949)
e. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) [Musical Commercial] The Philco Dittendorten National Anthem - 0:37(Abe Burrows)
All titles on:
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 2146 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   





Photos

The Smokin' Hot Piper Series, continued. Part XVII. First volume of the definitive, most authoritative of all Bing Crosby biographies. First published in 2001.


Schedule

The episode's date of recording (Monday, February 7) is given by both of my main Crosby sources (chronicler Malcolm Macfarlane, radio authority Lionel Pairpoint). No rehearsal date is given by either expert. Macfarlane adds the time for the recording activities (3:15–4:27 p.m., 6:40–7:15 p.m.).


Personnel And Songs

1. Guests
Ken Carpenter introduces the show's guests as "Peggy Lee, a pretty girl," and Abe Burrows, "a funny man." (While introducing the show's host, he adds, "oh, and here's Bing Crosby, a carefree boy.")

2. Solos And Duets
Peggy Lee did not sing any solos in this show. "I Wanna Go Where You Go" and "So In Love" are duets with Crosby.

This is the second of two Peggy Lee performances of "I Wanna Go Where You Go (Then I'll Be Happy)" in Bing Crosby radio programming. The first performance, from the December 15, 1948 episode, is actually a Lee solo.

"So In Love" is the first of also two performances. Crosby and Lee's second take on "So in Love" was heard again during Lee's next appearance in the show, on the March 9, 1949 broadcast.

The other above-listed pieces are part of the episode's parodic sketch, described in some detail below. The Crosby-Lee duet "It Means That We Are" is actually a very short piece -- one chorus or so. "Happy, Happy Days" features the singing of all three sketch participants: Burrows, Crosby, and Lee. So does "The Philco Dittendorten National Anthem."

3. "The Philco Dittendorten National Anthem"
This is a promotional commercial on behalf of Philco products, adapted this time to form part of the episode's sketch. I should clarify that the title "The Philco Dittendorten National Anthem" is entirely my invention (though based on my listening of the lyrics, of course). The data at hand gives it no title other than a generic "Philco Commercial."


Songwriters

1. Abe Burrows
A celebrated parodist, guest star Abe Burrows is presumed to have written all the songs that are part of the episode's main sketch. The show's patter certainly suggests that he did so. However, since no official corroboration for the claim is known to me, all songwriting credits to Burrows should be deemed tentative. (The possibility that he might have co-written this material could also be entertained.)


Personnel And Music

1. Milton Delugg
Toward the end of this episode, Bing Crosby thanks his guests (a customary practice on his part. Right after he mentions Abe Burrows' name, Crosby also thanks accordionist and pianist Milton Delugg, whose presence had not been acknowledged at the start of the show. DeLugg was Burrows' regular accompanist at the time, and probably supplied the piano playing in all the Burrows-written sketches and musical numbers. (During the 1947-1948 radio season, The Abe Burrows Show had aired with DeLugg as Burrows' accompanist.)

2. "So In Love"
The initial vocal choruses of "So In Love" are accompanied by guitar only. Strings join in during the ensuing choruses, in which the guitar is still prominently featured.


Patter And Sketches

1. Introduction Of Peggy Lee And Preamble To "I Wanna Go Where You Go"
Bing: ... I have a very charming accomplice this evening.
Ken: Oh, you mean Peggy Lee.
Bing: The Chesterfield girl herself. Take a bow, Peggy.
[Audience applause.]
Peggy: Hi, fellows.
Bing: ?That's quite ?an ?ensemble tonight.
Peggy: Oh, thank you.
Bing: Peggy, how about it; are you ready?
Peggy: I'm all set, Bing.
Bing: The Rhythmaires are gliding alongside in their canoe, bringing along beads, hard cocoanuts, bits of coral, and a very stylish arrangement of I Wanna Go Where You Go.
Peggy: Ah, the natives look so charming in this quaint little aisle of Philco.
Bing: Yes. Let's go. Shall we? _______ segueway right into aloha on the steel guitar. John, let's do it.

2. Preamble To "So In Love"
Bing: Miss Lee, would you join in presenting for the first time in this radio program a song entitled So In Love?
Peggy: Oh, I'd love to.
Bing: You got yourself a boy, Peg.
Peggy: And you got yourself a girl.
Bing (wistfully): At last.
[Audience laughter.]

3. The Duke Of Dittendorten Sketch
This parodic sketch is described by Abe Burrows as a "romantic kingdom operetta." Peggy Lee plays the role of Schnapsie, a German barmaid "dressed in a gown [with] a plunging neckline [and an] apron-plunging helm, carrying a gold plunger." Lee's intentionally wacky German accent elicits hearty laughs from the audience, and ditto for her delivery of a joke about the bar's beer. Of course, by the end of the sketch, her character has evolved from a commoner to the duchess of Dottendittern, the nearby kingdom. Dottendittern merges with Dittendorten when that kingdom's Duke (played by Crosby) picks Lee during his search for a wife. (Incidentally, a wife is defined in the script as "one of those soft round things").


Date: March 9, 1949 (Broadcast Date) (Pre-taped, Date Unknown)
Location: Marines Theater Memorial, San Francisco, California
Label: Philco Radio Time, Starring Bing Crosby (3rd Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Perry Botkin, Jr. (g), Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) So In Love - 2:51(Cole Porter)
US Government's Treasury Department Service 16" Transcription Disc113-114 — [Bing Crosby] Special Opportunity Drive Guest Star   (1949)
US Government's Treasury Department Service 16" Transcription DiscGxtv 108470 — [Various Artists] Treasury Of Stars; 25th Anniversary Album, 1941-1966   (1966)
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) When Is Sometime? - 1:30(Johnny Burke, Jimmy Van Heusen)
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 549 — I've Got A Crush On You   (1995)
Sunflower Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Sun 2108 — El Rancho Grande {Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee}   (2005)
Avid Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Avc 876 — Peggy Lee ("The Essential Collection" Series)    (2007)
c. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) Once And For Always - 2:04(Johnny Burke, Jimmy Van Heusen)
US Government's Department Of State 16" Transcription DiscPrograms No. 15 & No. 16 — American Personalities Parade   (1949)
Viper's Nest Collectors' Label CDVn 1003 — [Bing Crosby] Live Duets, 1947-1949   (1996)
Sunflower Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Sun 2108 — El Rancho Grande {Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee}   (2005)
All titles on:
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 96 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1949)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 2147 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   





Photos

The Smokin' Hot Piper Series, continued. Part XVIII. Second volume from Gary Giddins' trilogy of biographical crosbyana. Also, a magnified version of the photo that adorns this volume's front cover.


Schedule

Neither of my two main Crosby sources, Malcolm Macfarlane and Lionel Pairpoint, have specifics to give about this show's rehearsal and taping.


Songs

1. Repertoire
This episode concentrates on songs from the then-upcoming movie A Connecticut Yankee In King Arthur's Court, starring Bing Crosby.


Personnel

1. Guests
Contrary to customary procedure, the guests of this episode are not announced at the start of the show. (On this matter, see also the Patter below, point #1.) The first guest to eventually make an appearance is Peggy Lee. The second guest is Phil Harris, who comes accompanied by his sidekick Elliott Lewis (aka Frank Remley, supposedly Harris' guitar player). Lewis is also identified as a guest, and thanked at the end of the show, along with Harris and Lee.

2. Perry Botkin, Sr.
The accompaniment for "So In Love" consists almost exclusively of guitar, presumably from Botkin. As part of the banter with Phil Harris and his make-believe guitarist Elliott Lewis (banter about the possibility of hiring the latter for Philco Radio Time), Bing Crosby says that he can't fire guitarist Perry Botkin because Botkin has been with him for over 10 years and knows his "every nuance."

3. Duets And Solos
"When Is Sometime?" serves as Peggy Lee's solo for this episode. "So In Love" and "Once and For Always" are Lee-Crosby duets. This was Crosby and Lee's second take on "So in Love"; the first had been heard during Lee's previous appearance in the show, broadcast on February 23, 1949.


Patter

1. Dialogue About The Supposed Absence Of Guests For The Episode
Ken Carpenter and Bing Crosby start their banter by saying that they are in trouble, because their scheduled guests Louis Armstrong, Jack Teagarden, and Joe Venuti won't be in the show until the following week, after all.
Ken: But Bing, this is serious. What are we gonna do?
Bing; Well, somebody is bound to drop in and help us tonight, Ken. Our agents ?throughout are scouring the town at this very moment, armed with guns, nets and money. Meanwhile, while they are at it, John Scott Trotter and The Rhythmaires are ready.
Crosby then announces his first solo. After Crosby finishes singing, Ken Carpenter returns to topic:
Ken: But Bing, I'm still worried about not having any guests.
Bing: What do you mean, no guests? Look yonder there. Isn't that Peggy Lee?
Ken: Well, it certainly is!
Bing: And I bet this is only the beginning. Hi ya, Peg. What brings you here?
Peggy: Well, I was standing in the lobby of the St. Francis and a fellow stuck a gun on my rib and threw a melee with me and handed me a five dollar bill and here I am.
[Audience applause.]
Bing: Well! And I'm glad to see you, as well as I might be. You see, Ken, you see what I told you? I knew our boys would snag some people. You can take the net off now, Peg.
Peggy: Ha, ha!
Bing: Say, Peggy, a few weeks ago we did a duet on that fine Cole Porter tune So In Love. You want to do it again now while you here and ...?
Peggy: Yeah, I've got my five bucks --that is for something.
Bing: You got it.

2. Sketch
Phil Harris is trying to find guitarist Frank Remley a job with Bing Crosby, but Frankie is too captivated by Peggy to go meet Bing.
Phil: Hey, Frankie!
Frank: Hi, ya, honey. What's your name?
Peggy: Peggy Lee.
Phil: Look Frankie, this is Bing over here -- the one on the smock. You got the wrong blonde.
Frank: What are you doing here, honey?
Peggy: Well, I work here.
Phil: Frankie, will you break it up? I'm trying to get you some work.
Frank: I don't need work. My girl's got a job!
Phil: Listen, Frankie, you just don't go out and grab some blonde because she happens to have a good job.
Bing (in an aside): Look who's talking. [n.b.: Harris was married to Hollywood star Alice Faye.]


Issues

1. Special Opportunity Drive Guest Star [Transcription Disc]
2. Treasury Of Stars [Transcription Disc]
These two items are not available to me, and information about them is scant. However, I have seen photos online. As shown above, Lee is heard in only one of the songs featured in these transcription discs: "So In Love," performed as a duet with Bing Crosby.

The fact that I have not actually listened to these items pose significant challenges in my ability to pinpoint their particulars. Hence I am only tentatively identifying this session's version of "So In Love" is the one heard on these transcription discs. "So In Love" was sung by Crosby and Lee not only on the present episode of Philco Radio Time but also on the episode dated February 23, 1949, which has already been itemized above. The version from the earlier date remains a viable alternative.

See also separate discussion of each disc, below.

3. Special Opportunity Drive Guest Star [Transcription Disc]
This disc's label bears the inscription "do not play before May 29, 1949." The material featuring Crosby and Lee can be found on side #1 of the disc; the other side features Jo Stafford and The Starlighters with Paul Weston. As with all other Guest Star transcription discs, the Treasury Department's U.S. Saving Bonds Division produced the first of these discs.

Please note that the contents of this particular episode of Guest Star is atypical. Most of the other episodes of late 1940s-early 1950s episodes Guest Star which feature Peggy Lee contain new, fresh performances from her. (Details about them can be found in this discography's this page for military- and government-produced shows.)

I believe that late 1940s-early 1950s Guest Star episodes which bore a special name, such as this one (i.e. Special Opportunity Drive) are exceptions to the pattern described in the previous paragraph: they do not feature fresh performances, but cull instead material performed on other shows.

4. Treasury Of Stars, 25th Anniversary [LP]
The front cover of this 2LP set describes its contents as "music through the years for the United States Savings Bonds." It features a spoken intro by Merv Griffin. (As is also the case for the item discussed in the preceding paragraphs, this LP is not available to me, and I have not been able to listen to its contents.)


Of Club Maids & Minute Suppers: The Promotional Tie-In Shows
(December 1948 & March 1949)





Around 1948, the Vacuum Foods Corporation welcomed Bing Crosby as one of its largest stockholders (20,000 shares, bought as ten cents each), promptly adding his name to the board of directors. Previously known as the Florida Foods Corporation, the frozen-food company would adopt yet a third name, the Minute Maid Corporation, in 1949. That was the year on which a product recently created by the company -- concentrated orange juice --received a major boost in popularity and sales (soon to exceed $100,000,000) thanks in no small part to continuous promotion from Crosby. A crucial promotional tool was the creation of a 15-minute program hosted by the crooner.

The Minute Maid Show debuted on Monday, November 22, 1948, and ran each morning (Monday through Friday) at 9:45 on CBS radio until Friday, October 27, 1950 (though its broadcasting became more sporadic as time went by). Bing's old reliable companion Ken Carpenter stood by his side, serving as the show's master of ceremonies and partner in bantering. Pitches for Minute Maid were often made by The Old Groaner himself. One thing that he did not often do in this series, however, was singing. Taking on a disc jockey role instead, he played his own records and those of other artists. In the series' third episode, which seems to have run on Friday, December 10, 1948, Crosby the disc jockey played Peggy Lee's Capitol recording of "Why Don't You Do Right," which she had recorded a year earlier.





On March 10, 1949, the tables were turned: Bing Crosby was the guest on a show that Peggy Lee regularly hosted every Thursday, The Chesterfield Supper Club. The (transcribed) appearance was eventful. Lee an Crosby talked about the fact that the next season of Crosby's show would be sponsored by Chesterfield; he was thus joining her 'radio family.' Promotion was actually the order of the day -- or rather, the tenet that guided the guest appearance. Once again (as in the March 9, 1949 episode itemized above), the repertoire consisted of songs from Crosby's then-current movie, A Connecticut Yankee In King Arthur's Court. Lee and Crosby sang duet versions of "If You Stub Your Toe On The Moon" and "When Is Sometime." Lee also did a solo rendition of "Once And For Always." (Incidentally, this episode also has its own entry in the page that this discography dedicates to Lee's Supper Club Show.)





In the photograph presented right above, Peggy Lee is on board for Bing Crosby's pitch of a product from his native state. Date unknown; probably 1949 or 1950. Most of the other above-shown images are Minute Maid advertisements featuring Crosby, who in 1948 became an investor on the company's so called concentrated orange juice. Along with welcoming him as one of the stockholders, Minute Maid also gave the artist the title of Chairman of the Board and granted Bing Crosby Enterprises exclusive distribution rights of the product on the West Coast. Meanwhile, Peggy Lee and Mel Tormé were also scheduled to be featured in Sunkist Oranges national ads around this time, thanks to a tie-in orchestrated by their recording company, Capitol Records (presumably in conjunction with their shared manager, Carlos Gastel).


Date: March 16, 1949 (Broadcast Date) (Pre-taped 2/21)
Location: Marines Memorial Theater, San Francisco, California
Label: Philco Radio Time, Starring Bing Crosby (3rd Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Louis Armstrong (t), Jack Teagarden (tb), Loring "Red" Nichols (c), Perry Botkin, Jr. (g), James Moore (b), Edwin "Buddy" Cole (p), Nick Fatool (d), Joe Venuti (vn), Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) You Was - 3:30(Joseph F. "Sonny" Burke, Paul Francis Webster)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 97 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1949)
Magic/Submarine Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Dawe 48 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Swings   (1991)
Sepia Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) 1353 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (2020)
Delta Music Public Domain (NL) LP(Germany) Da 50.105 — [Various Artists] Glamour Stars Of Hollywood   
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 2148 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   





Schedule

The episode's date of recording (Monday, February 21) is given by both of my main Crosby sources (chronicler Malcolm Macfarlane, radio authority Lionel Pairpoint). No rehearsal date is given by either expert.


Photos

Above: Jack Teagarden, Peggy Lee, and Louis Armstrong. Though undated and uncaptioned, the photo is most likely to stem from this February 21, 1949 broadcast, or otherwise from its rehearsal. The additional presence of an ABC microphone strengthens the likelihood of a direct relation to ABC's Philco Radio Time. I should also mention that Armstrong, Lee, and Teagarden joined forces once more on January 18, 1950, for a taping of Crosby's CBS Chesterfield show.

Also worth pointing out is the fact that this photo is at odds with the contents of its broadcast: we do not hear Peggy Lee sing solo, as she seems to be doing here. There are several scenarios which could account for the discrepancy. Taped performances might have sometimes failed to make it into the broadcasts, due to timing constraints and abundance of material. Or all three artists could have been asked to just pose for a publicity photo -- i.e., to pretend to perform, for the benefit of camera lens. Naturally, we should not discard the additional possibility that the trio was not captured at a taping of Crosby's show, after all, but on a performance for a live event.

Yet another plausible scenario lingering on my mind involves a bit of trickery. On the later, 1950 CBS broadcast, Lee is accompanied by Armstrong and Teagarden on her solo performance of "I'm Coming, Virginia." It occurs to me that the 1950 CBS episode might have actually consisted of remaining material from this earlier, Philco-era taping, and that the photo above may have captured their performance of "I'm Coming Virginia." (The CBS episode was supposedly taped on January 18, 1950, but I wouldn't be surprised to find out that only some portions of it date from that day, the others having been culled from the February 21, 1949 date. See my notes under the later episode, broadcast on January 25, 1950.)

Further down below: according to the Louis Armstrong House Museum, Satchmo was the very first jazz musician to ever grace the cover of Time magazine. The issue was published on the very day of this taping. That convergence of events accounts for the fact that Louis' own copy was autographed by the show's producer, Bill Morrow, along with Bing, Jack, Ken, Peggy and three of the show's regular musicians -- Perry Botkin, John Scott Trotter, and Joe Venuti. Peggy Lee's dedication to Louis Armstrong reads "to the greatest, the greatest" -- the emphatic repetition of the phrase suggesting her lifelong-lasting love, friendship and admiration for the legendary jazz man. Their rapport can be glimpsed at the accompanying photo below, taken a few years later (1954), backstage at an outdoors TV taping. Incidentally, it is rather regretful to see how, on its Twitter account, the Armstrong museum sees fit to list Peggy Lee last among all the names of the artists who autographed the magazine copy -- in an order that suggest an elitist perspective by which she ranks as the least worthwhile in the bunch. Receiving even worse ranking than Peggy Lee is Bill Morrow: the museum's Twitter writer leaves him unmentioned, despite the prominent placement of his message (located near the left top corner, before the magazine's title).


Personnel (And Photo)

1. Guests
Ken Carpenter announces the episode's guests as "Peggy Lee, Louis Armstrong, Jack Teagarden, and Joe Venuti."

2. Solos And Duets
"You Was" is a Peggy Lee- Bing Crosby duet. In this broadcast, Lee is not heard singing any solos.

3. Instrumentalists
The claim that the episode's male guests perform during the Lee-Crosby duet should be deemed very tentative. Since the singers are backed by ensemble playing, Armstrong and Teagarden would have had to join the group, without performing any solos throughout. In a comment quoted below (under Patter), Crosby refers to "the boys" which will be "blowing and playing and stroking and swinging" during the performance, but does not identify them by name.





Patter

1. Introduction Of Peggy Lee
Bing: But now, Ken, Miss Peggy Lee approaches.
Ken: Ah, that's what I call a slick chick.
Bing: Ken, you are here in San Francisco to do a radio show. You are not here on a convention.
Ken: And the reason why I can't live a little?
Bing: Please, please. When a pretty girl walks up to the microphone, act like a gentleman. Like this. Good evening, Miss Lee.
Peggy: Miss Lee??
Bing: Yes.
Peggy: Oh, now, Bing, just because I couldn't have lunch with you, you don't have to give me the ice.
Bing: It's not that, Peggy. It's just that I think that we should be more formal on the program. That's why I'm wearing a dinner jacket.
Peggy: Ha, ha, ha. Oh, that's not a dinner jacket.
Bing: I'm gonna eat dinner in it. [Audience laughter.] Now, Peg, how about us doing the big duet we had scheduled for an opening?
Peggy: I am ready.
Bing: Then ?right away. Scott, if you have You Was there, on the racks, please drop a downbeat, huh, and get those boys going blowing and playing and stroking and swinging.

2. Postscript to "You Was"
Presumably featuring stellar accompaniment from both the regular ensemble and the guests (Armstrong, Teagarden), Bing and Peggy's duet rendition of "You Was" elicits very appreciative applause from the audience.
Bing: That's the nicest thing that ever came out of North Dakota, I'll tell you that.
Ken: Wonderful Fargo, North Dakota. Very nice, Peggy and Bing. You was terrific.
Bing: Was we?
Ken: Oh, yeah, you certainly was.
[Carpenter and Crosby move on to their pitch for Philco.]

3. Closing Remarks
Bing: Well, that about brings this bash bubbling to the brim. I'd like to tilt my s__ to Miss Peggy Lee for buzzing up for Tinselville. Isn't that nice, Tinselville? ...
Peggy: Heh, that's very nice.
Bing: ... to be with us tonight?
Peggy: Well, it was a ?craft-full ?teach for me, Bing. I really enjoyed hearing the mellow members of the society of hot.
Bing: Yes, le jazz hot. How about that. Those lads really laid a limp lag on the line, don't they?
Peggy: Ha, ha.
Louis Armstrong: We are just warming up, Mist'r Bing. You oughtta be here about 4 in the morning.
Bing: Oh, no, noo. That's way past my bedtime, Louie.
Jack Teagarden: What's the matter, Bing? Have you a square jaw?
Bing: No, they just softened me up. I gotta get home early and hit the hay or I'm just a mess in the morning."
Crosby then thanks Teagarden and Armstrong, and wishes them a good time while they play at the Flamingo Hotel in Las Vegas. Joe Venuti is called on next, and his current gig is plugged as well. So is Crosby's own appearance at the Paramount.
Peggy: Who's gonna be with you next week, Bing?
Bing: Next week, Peggy, Broadway's favorite daughter, marvelous Ethel Merman, joins us in California.
Peggy: That I have to hear.
Bing: Oh, don't miss it. She really comes on.


Date: April 13, 1949 (Broadcast Date) (Pre-taped, Date Unknown)
Location: Hollywood, California
Label: Philco Radio Time, Starring Bing Crosby (3rd Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee (v), Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires {Conlon, Mack McLean, Loulie "Lily" Jean Norman, Charles Parlato, Gloria Wood}, The Gonzaga University Glee Club (bkv)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) Easter Parade - 2:30(Irving Berlin)
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) Down The Old Ox Road - 2:30(Sam Coslow, Arthur Johnston)
Varèse Sarabande Licensed CD066905 — [Bing Crosby] Crosby Classics   (2008)
Sepia Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) 1353 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (2020)
Both titles on:
US Government's Department Of State 16" Transcription DiscPrograms No. 15 & No. 16 — American Personalities Parade   (1949)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 101 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1949)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 2150 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   






Photo

In acknowledgment of this episode's concerns with all things Easter, here are two 1948 shots of Peggy Lee, presumably taken around Easter time. Visible in the background of the first shot is Lee's daughter, Nicki.


Schedule

Neither of my two main Crosby sources, Malcolm Macfarlane and Lionel Pairpoint, have specifics to give about this show's rehearsal and taping.


Personnel

1. Guests
The episode's guests are Peggy Lee and the Gonzaga University Glee Club (Spokane, Washington). Enthusiastically loud applause is heard after most of the songs, most likely coming from a young college audience and/or from the club's members.

2. Solos And Duets
Both of the above-listed performances from this episode are Lee-Crosby duets. "Easter Parade" is a reprise; the pair's first performance of this song had been heard in the March 24, 1948 broadcast.


Patter

1. Banter And Preamble To "Easter Parade"
Peggy: Hi, fellows.
Bing: Well, looks who's here, Peggy Lee!
[Audience applause.]
Bing: Peg, you are really coming on tonight. You really decked up. You are giving us a preview of your new Easter gown?
Peggy: Well, no Bing, but this dress is the very latest thing. It was flown over from Paris.
Bing: Flown over, huh? Is the rest of it coming by boat?
Peggy: No, Bing, that's all there is. There isn't any more.
Bing: Oh, poor dear, you must be cold. Ken, wrap your coat around Peg's shoulders.
Ken: Well, I'd be glad to.
Bing: Well, take it off first!
Ken: Where's your coat, Bing?
Bing: On the parking lot.
Ken: On the car?
Bing: No, just in a parking space. I didn't bring my car today.
Peggy: Well, did you walk down, Bing?
Bing: No, I hopped. Ken says I'm a rabbit. I'll start a trend. Now, delightful as this dialogue might seem to us, I think that Peggy and I should hop into a song, and perhaps The Ryhthmaires will care to hop along with us.
Peggy: If Cassidy's here, he can hop along, too.
Bing: Oh, come now, Peggy, this isn't television. In honor of the Easter bunny, Mister Trotter conducts the orchestra this evening with a bright orange carrot. Our selection is Irving Berlin's Easter Parade.

2. Preamble to "Down The Old Ox Road"
Peggy: Gee, that was really fine, boys and Bing.
Bing: Call me a boy tonight, too, will you, Peggy?
Peggy: Call you a boy?
Bing: Yeah.
Peggy: Well, you have four already. You want another one?
Bing: I'll pass, thanks. As Groucho Marx used to say, if I want a boy, I'll call Western Union. Really, Peg, tonight I'm in a very collegiate mood. With practically no persuasion, I think I can sing Down The Old Road.
Peggy: And with even less persuasion, I'll join you.
Bing: Capital! This tune really goes back. Way, way back before bees had propellers on. Scott Trott! John Scott, let's head down the old road. Has some local connotation which eludes me. [Sparse laughter.]

3. Sketch: Bing's College Days
Bing: Singing that song really remind me of my old college days.
Peggy: What about your college nights?
Bing: Oh, those too. Especially.
Peggy: Ha, ha.
Bing: Oh, I remember the yearning I had for a college education. But things were rough. I never thought I'd be able to go to college. They were tough, bitter years, and I struggled and fought and worked as hard as I could to make it. Finally, after 8 years, I got out of high school. That summer, my father took me aside and talked to me man to man.

The dialogue then moves on to Bing's reminiscences about his luck with girls. This segment of the dialogue devolves into a succession of vignettes. In the first vignette, Peggy plays a young woman who lives in Spokane with her family.
Peggy: Oh, look father, there come some college boys down the street.
Father: College boys?! Don't let them get inside the house!
Peggy: But father. These are Gonzaga men.
Father: Then take your mother with you.
Peggy: Oh look father. Bing Crosby is with them.
Father: Take your grandma inside!
Bing: Evening, evening, Miss Peggy. Come out from under the Porsche now. I want you to see me in my raccoon coat.
Peggy: Oooh, it's beautiful. But isn't it a little big on you?
Bing: Yeah, a little. It used to belong to my brother Everett.
Peggy: Oh, how is Everett?
Bing: He's done right well. He's wearing a mink coat now.
Peggy: Mink?!
Bing: Yes!
Peggy: "Jeepers creepers! How did he make enough money to buy a mink?
Bing: He sold me this raccoon coat.

The sketch moves on next (sans Peggy Lee) to young Bing Crosby's experiences in sports and scholastics. Afterwards, Crosby comes back to the topic of girls.
Bing: Ah, yes. Yes. Those were the golden days. And the nights weren't bad either. In the springtime, when the air was balmy and the moon was full, many's the night I spent with a charming young lady canoeing on the lake.
Peggy: Gee, Bing, they had canoes in those days?
Bing: In those days, Peg, we got our canoes direct from the Indians.
Bing is then heard talking with an Indian canoe dealer, from whom he obtains a canoe in exchange for his raccoon coat.
Bing: Later that night, you could've found me in my canoe strumming the ukulele to a beautiful girl sitting under the moon in Spirit Lake.
Local man: Say, Bucky.
Bing" What is it?
Local man: Say, why is it that all you young fellows call this here Spirit Lake?
Bing: Well, I'll show you, old timer. Say, honey, how's it about a kiss?
Peggy: Sure, big boy.
[The sound of a kiss is heard.]
Bing: That's the spirit.

Bing: After 4 years that passed all too quickly, graduation day arrived.
Peggy: Were you there?
Bing: I certainly was. I must admit, of all the graduates on the stage, I was the outstanding one, dressed in cap and gown.
Peggy: Well, didn't the other boys wear caps and gowns?
Bing: Yes, but I wore a bathing cap and a nightgown. You see, I was a night guard at Hayden Lake and I came right from work.

The sketch ends with Bing's graduation day, in which the dean does not give him his diploma because it isn't ready. (The reason for the delay: the dean tells him that the school didn't think he would ever graduate.)


Date: April 27, 1949 (Broadcast Date) (Pre-taped 3/21)
Location: Studio B, NBC West Coast Radio City, Hollywood, California
Label: Philco Radio Time, Starring Bing Crosby (3rd Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Abe Burrows, Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) Bali Ha'i - 2:45(Oscar Hammerstein II, Richard Rodgers)
Demand Performance Collectors' Label cassetteDpc 707 — The Unforgettable Peggy Lee   (1985)
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) Bebop Spoken Here - 2:18(Milton DeLugg, Matt Malneck)
Sunflower Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Sun 2108 — El Rancho Grande {Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee}   (2005)
c. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) She's The Sweetheart Of Delta Delta Tau - 0:48(Abe Burrows)
d. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) Upper Peabody Technological College - 0:24(Abe Burrows)
All titles on:
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 103 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1949)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 2151 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   





Photos

The Smokin' Hot Piper Series, continued. Part XIX.


Schedule

The episode's date of recording (Monday, March 21) is given by both of my main Crosby sources (chronicler Malcolm Macfarlane, radio authority Lionel Pairpoint). No rehearsal date is given by either expert. Macfarlane adds the time for the recording activities (4:30–5:30 p.m., 5:30–7:30 p.m.).


Personnel

1. Guests
According to Ken Carpenter during his customary opening of the show, the episode's guest are Abe Burrows "who sings on records and nightclubs and on the radio, and Peggy Lee, who sings on records and nightclubs and on the radio." ("Now," continues Carpenter, "here's a man who sings on records and on the radio, at golf matches, in bathtubs, plumbing store openings, during the seventh-inning stretch of Forbes Fields, Pittsburgh, at silo dedications and in vacant lots: Bing Crosby!")

2. Solos And Duets
"Bali Ha'i" is a Peggy Lee solo, and "Bebop Spoken Here" a duet with Crosby. The other above-listed numbers are part of Abe Burrows' parodic sketch. "Upper Peabody Technological College" is a trio. "She's The Sweetheart Of Delta Delta Tau" is a Burrows and Lee duet. Lee would reprise "Bali Ha'i" during her next appearance in the show (May 11, 1949).


Patter

1. Introduction Of Peggy Lee And Prelude To "Bali Ha'i"
Bing: "Chesterfield's charming chantoose and Bali Ha'i, from Tales Of The South Pacific."

2. Preamble To "Bebop Spoken Here"
After Peggy finishes her performance, and as the audience applauds, Bing speaks again.
Bing: Ah, that was lovely, Peggy. Fiiine.
Peggy: Ah, dank you. Dank you."
[Lee's "dank you" is an intentional echo, alluding to the use of the phrase during an earlier vignette in which she was not involved.]
Bing: If I could get a ?berth on the ?Southern ?Cross and the Sea of S__ S___, I'd give the whole thing up in ?an ?hour. Ahem! You were superb, really. Say, Peg, I heard some rumblings among the sharper circles that the cats are considering me a little behind the beat.
Peggy: Ah, what are you talking about, Bing?
Bing: Well, Peg, in a word, and a mighty strange word it is, bebop.
Well, I'll tell you, Milton DeLugg and Matty Malnek have written a musical lesson that explains the whole thing, called Bebop Spoken Here, I think.
Big: Well, I'd like to articulate right here. Yes, let's see, I'll tell you what, Peg, we'll try this. You'll be and I'll bop.
Peggy: Crazy, man!
Bing: [Answers with onomatopoeic bebop lingo.]

3. The Upper Peabody Technological College Sketch
The episode's sketch is another of guest Abe Burrows' parodies. This one is, in his own wording, "a college-type musical." Bing plays the role of Crusher Crosby, a dim-witted country boy who attends Upper Peabody Technological College, where he is the star of the football team. Crusher eventually tells coach Burrows that something is gnawing at him.
Crusher: I got a hankerin' for romance."
Abe: Romance puts pressure. A man can't play football and go out with girl.
Crusher: Why not? Girls don't mind being tackled.
Abe: Well, I know how you feel. I know how they feel, too: soft. [Audience laughter.] Well, look, look it here. Here comes a girl you're gonna like. It's Peggy Lee.
Peggy: Hel-lo.
Crusher: Hello .... This is what I've been thinking about, coach. [Audience laughter.]
Crusher: Say, you are as pretty as a red-wing blackbird approaching upon a yellow pumpkin.
Peggy: So, he ?ain't a poet.
Abe: Crusher, you know what Peggy is? She is a song cue.
Crusher: A songquew?
Abe: Well, she the sweetheart of Delta Delta Tau.
Abe: Well, I know you two are going to get along real fine.
Peggy: Say, Crusher, you know where we are?
Crusher: Where?
Peggy: Well, this is called lovers' lane.
Abe: Yeah, and over there is Flirtation Walk. And right next to it is Neckers' Nook. And behind that is Schmochers' Rock. And right beside that is Woo-pitching Wallow.
Crusher: This sure is a busy place.
Peggy: Well, where do we go, Crusher?
Bing: Well, I'm a little nervous. You got anything called Casual Acquaintances Bench?
The sketch then moves on to Crusher's vicissitudes as he learns that he has to pass his courses in order to be able to remain in the football team.


Date: May 11, 1949 (Broadcast Date) (Pre-taped, Date Unknown)
Location: Marines Memorial Theatre, 609 Sutter Street , San Francsico, California
Label: Philco Radio Time, Starring Bing Crosby (3rd Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Perry Botkin, Jr. (g), Israel "Izzy" Rosenbaum (b), Alec Templeton (p), Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) How It Lies, How It Lies, How It Lies - 1:42(Joseph F. "Sonny" Burke, Paul Francis Webster) / arr: John Scott Trotter
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 105 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1949)
Sunflower Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Sun 2108 — El Rancho Grande {Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee}   (2005)
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) Far Away Places - 1:14(Alex Kramer, Joan Whitney)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 105 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1949)
c. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) Blue Hawaii - 1:13(Ralph Rainger, Leo Robin)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 105 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1949)
Sepia Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) 1353 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (2020)
d. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) Bali Ha'i - 3:16(Oscar Hammerstein II, Richard Rodgers)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscProgram 105 — [Bing Crosby] Philco Radio Time   (1949)
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 549 — I've Got A Crush On You   (1995)
Sunflower Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Sun 2108 — El Rancho Grande {Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee}   (2005)
Avid Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Avc 876 — Peggy Lee ("The Essential Collection" Series)    (2007)
e. ExtantBing Crosby Show (ABC) [Musical Commercial] You Ought To Get A Portable Philco - 1:57(Alec Templeton)
All titles on:
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 2152 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   








Photos

Episodes of variety shows such as Bing Crosby's were sent out to radio stations in the form of discs whose labels stipulated a limited period of time for airplay. Known as transcriptions, such discs were most often 16 inches in diameter and made of black vinyl. However, 12-inch discs were by no means exceptional, and neither was the use of shellac or red vinyl. Herein we are seeing that ABC and Bing Crosby Enterprises made 16-inch red vinyl discs for the particular episode of Philco Radio Time under our discussion. The episode was spread over three disc sides, with the remaining side also put to use -- as a space for testing. (That fourth side has grooves on which the engineers at the stations could calibrate or adjust the speed of the playback.) The photos above also allow us to take a peak at not just the discs themselves but also some of the accompanying paperwork, which typically consisted of instructions for airplay, copies of the script and, occasionally, publicity photography. One more component viewable above is the original packaging on which ABC sent all this material to local Philco distributors, who would have in turn taken it to the radio stations under their responsibility. For more pictures of Philco Radio Time ET discs, check the notes under the episode broadcast on January 1, 1947.


Schedule

Neither of my two main Crosby sources, Malcolm Macfarlane and Lionel Pairpoint, have specifics to give about this show's rehearsal and taping.


Personnel

1. Guests
Billed as the episodes guests are Alec Templeton and Peggy Lee. Unlike most other episodes, this time Lee's name is mentioned second rather than first. Templeton had also guested in the episode that preceded this one (along with Carole Richards).

2. Perry Botkin, Sr.
3. Izzy Rosenbaum
These two musicians are tentatively listed in this session. Because Bing Crosby credits them as playing in his solo rendition of "Ghost Riders In The Sky," they are presumed to also play in the numbers sung by Peggy Lee. Perry Botkin is known to have been a regular member of the show. Rosenbaum appears to have been the show's bassist at this point in time.

4. Solos, Duets And Medleys
The above-listed musical commercial features the trio of Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee, and Alec Templeton. "How It Lies, How It Lies, How It Lies" is a Crosby-Lee duet. They actually performed the song twice on radio, first in this episode and next in an episode broadcast on October 12, 1949. Crosby had also sung a solo version of "How It Lies, How It Lies, How It Lies"in an earlier episode (April 27, 1949) that happened to feature Lee.

The other above-listed numbers are part of a Hawaiian or South Pacific medley/sketch, and their only musical accompaniment is Alec Templeton's piano. All those medley numbers are Crosby-Lee duets, except for "Bali Hai'," which is a Peggy Lee solo. Lee had actually sung "Bali Ha'i" once before, during her previous appearance in the show (April 27, 1949). .


Arrangers

1. John Scott Trotter
Bing Crosby credits John Scott Trotter t with this episode's arrangement of "How It Lies, How It Lies, How It Lies." The show's bandleader was actually in charge of all the arrangements (except for special material such as the parodic medleys brought to the show by guests such as Alec Templeton, Johnny Mercer). However, Trotter is known to have farmed out his arrangements sometimes -- as was the case with many an overworked bandleader/arranger.


Songs And Songwriters

1. "Far Away Places"
This duet number, sung in something of a mock-operetta, mock-vaudeville style, includes spoken exhortations ("bravissimo, Peggy, bravissimo Peggy, hi, hi!"") from Alec Templeton, who is still playing the classical, Verdi-like composer role that he had assumed in the previous episode.

3. "You Ought To Get A Portable Philco"
The humorous lyrics of this parodic Philco commercial were presumably written by Alec Templeton. "You Ought To Get A Portable Philco" parodies a couple of Cole 'Portable' songs ("Night And Day," "I've Got You Under My Skin"). As part of the parodies, the melody of a popular rhythmic tune of the time is used as well. (The title of the tune in question is currently escaping me. It is not a Porter number.) The jesting lyrics include the line "you can get Philco and Peggy wherever you go," sung by Templeton himself.

I should further clarify that the title "You Ought To Get A Portable Philco" is entirely my invention (though based on my listening of the lyrics, of course). The data at hand gives it no title other than the generic "Philco Commercial."


Venue And Patter

1. San Francisco
The dialogue between Bing Crosby and Ken Kennedy clarifies that Crosby is in San Francisco for the ongoing filming of his movie Riding High. One of the script's jokes pertains to the royal treatment that is being bestowed on Broadway Bill, a horse that plays a prominent role in the film. The pampering supposedly includes a suite at the Palace Hotel, where he is the most popular guest among bellboys because "they can pick up suitcases and they can ride him up to his room." Peggy Lee shows up immediately after Crosby delivers that joke.

Bing: Oh, hello, Peg.
Peggy: Hi, Bing.
Bing: Oh, ladies and gentlemen, Miss Peggy Lee just dropped in ...!
[Audience applause.]
Bing: All dressed up and -- baby blue on tonight.
Peggy: Yeees.
Bing: Peggy, are you having a good time in San Francisco?
Peggy: Oh yes, but the strangest thing happened to me when I checked in the Palace.
Bing: What happened?
Peggy: Well, the bellboy picked up my suitcases and rode me piggyback up to my room!
[Audience laughter.]
Bing: Oh, noo. Well, I'll be darn. Now, Peggy, enough of this horse talk. How about you and me whining a song?

2. Preamble To The Trip To Hawaii Medley
The episode's script assigns a few other jokes to Lee, and even has her asking if she could learn to play the hula.
Alec: Well, Bing, why don't we take a little trip to Hawaii right now?
Bing: Okay, I'm sure ready and willing. Peg, would you like to sail to the islands with us?
Peggy: Oh, gosh, Bing, you think I could ever learn the hula?
Bing: Certainly. You've got the equipment. All you have to do is alert it.
Peggy: Well then, shall we be off?
Narration from Crosby, to the effect that they have just arrived in Honolulu, ensues. The sketch quickly devolves into a medley of Hawaiian-associated numbers.

3. Postlude To "Bali Ha'i"
After Crosby and Lee's rendition of "Blue Hawaii," and while the audience is strongly applauding, the man speaks.
Bing: Thank you, Peg. Thank you, Peg. And thank you, Alec.
Alec: Well, while we're here in the Pacific, Bing, maybe we could go a little farther south.
Bing: Well, why, I think we should. Say, we think we could go as far as Bali Ha'i?
Alec: Exactly.
Bing: From Tales Of The South Pacific. Peg does it real good, too. You got a record on this, Peg?
Peggy: Yes, I do.
Bing: Well, fine, transport us to the south past.
After Peggy Lee finishes singing Bali Ha'i, and while the audience applauds, Bing says: "Oh, Peggy. That was great, Peggy. Wonderful. Six ushers just left to join the navy."




The Bing Crosby Show For Chesterfield

After spending three seasons under contract with ABC's Philco Radio Time, Bing Crosby proceeded to sign another three-year contract as the host of CBS' The Bing Crosby Show For Chesterfield. Apparently at Crosby's request, the Wednesday schedule from his Philco Radio Time period was kept through the entire run of the Chesterfield series, though a slight change was made to the starting time -- 9:30 instead of 9:00 in the East Coast (6:30 in West Coast stations such as KNX). The slot was suitably sandwiched between CBS shows hosted by Groucho Marx and Burns & Allen. The first episode was broadcast on September 21, 1949, the 39th and last on June 25, 1952. Ken Carpenter and John Scott Trotter remained firmly in place for the duration of the series.

Peggy Lee's involvement with this newly sponsored edition of the show was coyly announced in the October 1948 issue of Capitol News: "Although Judy Garland and Abe Burrows bobbed up as Bing Crosby's first guests on Bing's new coffin-nail program when it premiered Sept. 21 over CBS, Peg Lee has been secretly signed to do 13 guest appearances with the Croz during the coming months." Garland was also identified as the guest for the opening episode in Variety magazine.

Both Variety and Capitol News errr: there was no Garland. It was instead Peggy Lee who was present for the September 21 episode -- billed as a guest. So was Burrows. The press' erroneous claim might be an indication that Garland was originally scheduled to appear, but had to cancel. Lee would have then come to the rescue.

On its March 23, 1949 issue , Variety had also stated that Peggy Lee was going to be "a regular with Bing Crosby next season although non exclusive." Actually, the Chesterfield series had no regular or semi-regular girl singer. Lee was the only person who came anywhere close to such a denomination. In addition to making more appearances than any other female guest, the songstress was present for both the opening and the closure of the series, too. She appeared in the first two episodes (September 21 & 28, 1949) and also in the last two (June 18 & 25, 1952). A Variety article published on September 13, 1949, reported that Lee would be paid $1,750 per episode.

Peggy Lee indeed performed in 13 episodes of this entire series. That total ties her with Bob Hope in the category of most guest appearances on the Chesterfield incarnation of Crosby's show. Close on their heels is Judy Garland, who made 12 appearances. (However, Variety had reported that both Garland and Lee were scheduled to make 13 appearances. Variety had also reported that Garland was scheduled to appear on the debut episode; she did not.) After Hope, Lee, and Garland, the largest number of guest entries were made by Louis Armstrong, Gary Crosby, Lindsay Crosby, and Al Jolson, with either 6 or 7 visits in each case.

I should also note that the majority of Lee's visits to Crosby's Chesterfield show were circumscribed to the series' first season (1949-1950). It may be asked why, in comparison to the Philco years, Lee appeared in far less episodes during this Chesterfield period. At issue was, at least in part, Lee's busy schedule during the early 1950s, when she was hosting not only her own radio show but also various TV shows. Television required her to stay in New York, and thus away from the California-based Crosby show.





Photos


Above: the one and the many ads that Chesterfield placed in the trade press to promote their product, their shows, and the radio stars to whom a pretty penny was paid for hosting duties. Suffice to discuss just one of these ads. Promoting the three big male radio stars under Chesterfield's hire, the first one arguably featured the most characteristic artwork design of the company's ad campaign. Compare it, for instance, to the parallel ads placed by the cigarette company for another show of theirs, The Chesterfield Supper Club, which happened to count Peggy Lee among its three regular hosts. (A quick visit to this discography's Supper Club page will provide you with a view of the parallel ad created for that show.) Clearly swimming in revenue --thanks in no small measure to the cache and addictiveness of its main product-- Chesterfield also paid dozens of top Hollywood stars for the right to use their likeness on similar ads, furthermore hiring them to voice radio commercials as well. (Below: photography pertaining to this show's venue. Speciifcs are provided within the ensuing paragraphs.)


Routine


According to a Program Profile on the June 1950 issue of Radio And Television Best, at that point in time, the preparations for a Bing Crosby show were "... as casual and lacking in stress as the finished product that you hear on the air." The magazine's reporter continue to elaborate (probably in a slightly idealized, PR-friendly manner) as follows: "[t]he groundwork is begun when Bing and his producer, Bill Morrow, have their first huddle to develop a central idea for a program -- and the inspiration may come when they are on the golf course, swimming, at the races or playing a sizzling game of gin rummy. The next move is to fit a guest star to the idea, rather than sign a personality strictly because he or she is particularly 'hot' at the moment ... The objective is always to produce a good show rather than provide a showcase for talent that someone think is ripe for an appearance with Der Bingle. This rule also applies to regular who are under contract, such as The Rhythmaires, vocalists Peggy Lee and Carol Richards. They'll appear when the fit definitely into the show idea."

"With program idea and guest star settle," the reporter continued, "Morrow retires to his abode and whips out a 'rough' on his typewriter, keeping constantly inn touch with Crosby as his script develops. Quite frequently, Bing takes the first draft of the script and inserts some whimsies and flamboyant phrases of his own. During the actual pre-broadcast taping of a show, Crosby is often moved to wander away from the prepared dialogue and launch into a eloquent dissertation. However, he always gets back to the script to give the right cue to a performer who has the next speech. The shows are always rehearsed in segments -- no 'dress.' John Scott Trotter rehearses his bandmen before the taping and the cast has an informal script reading session on the day it is transcribed. This is done in a thoroughly relaxed fashion, around a table in a room offstage. There may be some clowning but it has to be good, and brief. All the songs are then pre-recorded, and Crosby then makes the selection from his platters and those of guest singers. Yet, in the long run, the renditions made for the tape may prove the most effective.

The reporter then moves on to talk about the start of the taping: "announce Ken Carpenter comes on stage ... and introduces Bing with a few snide remarks. Crosby bids the visitors welcome in his own fashion ... whereupon he tells the 'live' audience that they are part of the proceedings and that their applause is welcome. Murdo MaKenzie, co-producer, gives the opening cue from the control room and the show is on the air. From there on in, there rarely is a fluff, but if there is, Bing makes capital of it for an impromptu gag. The end."







Venue


Previously dependent on an affiliate (KHJ), CBS finally purchased its own LA radio station in 1936. Intent on making the station (KNX) its West Coast flagship, and needing premium space for it, CBS also acquired on that year the Vine Street Theatre, a establishment that had been a stage and movie house in its previous incarnations (1927-1935). The network renamed it the CBS Radio Playhouse, but the old "Vine Street Theatre" name never fell into full disuse.

The location was a key factor in the purchase. The Playhouse was conveniently located within short distance of ABC, NBC, and CBS' own West Coast corporate headquarters. To wit: NBC was on Vine's intersection with Sunset Boulevard (1500 N. Vine Street, aka 6285 Sunset), ABC on Vine between Sunset and Selma Street (1533 N. Vine), the Vine Theatre in the intersection with Selma (1615 N. Vine), and CBS Columbia Square a couple of blocks away from Vine (6121 Sunset Boulevard).

As we should be able to gather from the ticket stub picture above, the Playhouse was the site on which most episodes of The Bing Crosby Show For Chesterfield were broadcasted. Although this stub was for an episode in which Peggy Lee did not participate, the ticket is still worth inspecting for the quaint details that it offers (e.g., doors to close ten minutes before the scheduled start of the proceedings), and for its corroboration of the venue.

The front façade of the Playhouse is featured above in three long-distance views, all of them believed to date from the late 1930s or early 1940s. Each picture offers a closer look than the building than the preceding one. Also visible is the adjacent KNX radio station, from which episodes of Chesterfield Presents had been broadcast long before Crosby became the show's host.

Of the two remaining images, the last one shows us the Playhouse' stage, as it presumably looked right before and after the taping of an episode. We see a piano, chairs, music stands, a podium, microphones, et cetera. The other picture acquaints us with the equipment used for tapings of the show -- or, more accurately, tapings done off-site, at places such as the Marines Memorial or the Plaza Theatre. We are seeing microphones, speakers, amplifiers, RCA mixers devised for remote recording and, on the back, portable Ampex machines. All three engineers working for Crosby's music enterprises, th men dimly in view are, from left to right, John Mullin, Murdo MacKenzie, and Norm Dewes. (Found on several sites online, these two pictures appear to be courtesy of Dewes.)


I should clarify that The CBS Radio Playhouse was only one of the several locations on which CBS taped its radio programs. Some of the other facilities were within -- or fairly close to -- Columbia Square, where CBS' headquarters were located. I have seen ticket stubs for CBS shows with addresses such as Studios B and C on Columbia Square (at 6121 Sunset Boulevard), Studio 4 on 1313 North Vine Street, and CBS Playhouse #2 at 6126 Hollywood Boulevard (i.e., two blocks east of Vine). Nonetheless, when it comes to the taping of The Bing Crosby Show For Chesterfield, so far I have only come across one local address: 1615 North Vine.





Crosby also taped about a dozen Chesterfield episodes in San Francisco. The cool and collected crooner favored working on that celebrated city for its proximity to the Monterey Bay area, where he had a leisure home next to the Pebble Beach golf course. The avid golfer would have also looked forward to spending time at the major sports event that had carried his name since 1947, the Bing Crosby National Pro-Amateur Tournament.

We do not have an official record of the exact locations on which those ten or twelve episodes were taped.

We do have, however, press accounts that identify the Marines Memorial Theatre as the location of one particular Chesterfield Presents Bing Crosby taping. We also know of an earlier, Philco-era episode that he taped there as well. I am referring to the impressive club that opened in 1946 as a so-called living memorial at the service of US Marines soldiers, and which is still active and standing today, as a 12-story hotel and military museum-library.

Of the three photos right above, the first two date from 1947, and are thus close in time to the tapings of Crosby's show at the Marines. The third photo is from a 1991 press article. The designated area for those tapings might have been the hotel's large theatre, which currently has a 564-seating person capacity. An alternative location, probably favored by at least some members of the show, would have been the famous rooftop restaurant (captured above in the middle picture), with its panoramic view of San Francisco.


Date: September 21, 1949 (Broadcast Date) (Pre-taped 9/18)
Location: CBS Playhouse, 1615 North Vine, Hollywood, California
Label: The Bing Crosby Show For Chesterfield (1st Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Warren Baker, Morris Bercov, Dent Eckles, Julian "Matty" Matlock, Lawrence "Larry" Wright (r), Robert "Bobby" Guy, George Seaberg (t), Walter Benson, Wendell "Gus" Mayhew, William "Bill" Schaefer (tb), Loring "Red" Nichols (c), Perry Botkin, Jr. (g), Phil Stephens (sb), Edwin "Buddy" Cole (p), Milton De Lugg (pac), Nick Fatool (d), Harry Bluestone aka Blostein, Jacques Gasselin, Murray Kellner, Mayer Oberman, Raoul Poliakin, Mischa Russell (vn), Samuel "Sam" Freed, Jr (vl), Cy Bernard (vc), Abe Burrows, Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) Louisa From Lake Luise - 1:06(Abe Burrows)
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 549 — I've Got A Crush On You   (1995)
Sunflower Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Sun 2110 — Just the Way You Are {Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee}   (2005)
Avid Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Avc 876 — Peggy Lee ("The Essential Collection" Series)    (2007)
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) We Love The Canadian Rockies - 0:43(Abe Burrows)
c. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) Maybe It's Because (I Love You Too Much) - 1:50(Irving Berlin)
Sunflower Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Sun 2110 — Just the Way You Are {Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee}   (2005)
All titles on:
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscShow 1 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby Show   (1949)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 1055 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   





Photos

The Smokin' Hot Piper Series, continued. Part XX. On a train, on a car, on a yacht ...


The Show: Chesterfield Pitch

This season opener marks the start of Bing Crosby's partnership with a new sponsor: Chesterfield, under whom Peggy Lee herself had been contracted for a while. As part of the episode's promotional pitch of the product, we hear Crosby declare that "It's my cigarette; I know that," and we also hear Lee affirm that "Chesterfield is my cigarette, too." Furthermore, announcer Ken Carpenter introduces Crosby as "the Chesterfield Boy."


Schedule

The episode's date of recording is given as Sunday, September 18 by Crosby radio authority Lionel Pairpoint. For his part, Crosby chronicler Malcolm Macfarlane mentions two days of recording activity, September 18 and 19. No rehearsal date is given by either expert. Macfarlane adds that, during those two days, the contents for two episodes featuring Peggy Lee and Abe Burrows were transcribed. (The other episode was broadcast on October 12.)


Dating

As indicated above, the season's opening show was taped on Sunday, September 18, 1949. This date is extant in the extant documentation from Crosby's archives. Additional corroboration comes from an article on the September 13, 1949 issue of Variety, on which we are told that the show was scheduled to be taped on the upcoming "Sunday afternoon."


Personnel

1. Guests
Billed as the episode's two guests are Abe Burrows and Peggy Lee (announced in that order; compare to next episode). The aforementioned article from the September 13, 1949 issue of Variety states that Judy Garland was scheduled to be the guest. If the periodical's information was not erroneous (as it could well have been), then perhaps Garland had to cancel, and Lee was promptly asked if she could fill in (as part of her contractual agreement to appear on 13 episodes this season). Variety also reported that, at press time, Garland's manager was trying to work out a deal with Metro Goldwyn Mayer, to allow her to make for 13 appearances on Crosby's show. (Garland would end up making twelve; Lee would make thirteen.)

2. Solos And Duets
"Maybe It's Because" is rendered as a duet sung by Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee. The other two above-listed numbers are part of a musical parody created by guest Abe Burrows. One of them, "Louisa From Lake Louise," is a Lee solo. The other, "We Love The Canadian Rockies" is a trio with Burrows and Crosby.

3. Mliton DeLugg
During the show, Bing Crosby acknowdges the playing of accordion by Milton DeLugg (see below, under Patter).


Patter

1. Introduction Of Peggy Lee
Bing: Now, ladies and gentlemen, charm, loveliness and talent makes the scene here in the person of one of our really great singers, the pretty, popular and pleasing Peggy Lee.
Peggy: Hi, Bing.
[Audience applause.]
Bing: Glad you are here, Peg. You know Abe Burrows there.
Peggy: Oh, sure; hello, Abe.
QAbe: Peggy, doll, Peggy!!! It's so good to see you, mmm!! You look wonderful! I'm so glad you're here.
Abe (in an aside to Bing): Hey, Bing, what do we need her for?
Bing: Clearly, Abe, we need her because there's nothing like a dame.
Abe: Well, that makes sense, and I'm glad to see Peggy. I really am.
Peggy: That's what I like about you, Abe. Even when you are two-faced, you show both of them.
Abe: Ain't it awful -- and I hardly have hair enough for one.
Abe: You know, Peggy, it's wonderful to have you here, really, because Mr. Crosby, over here, has commissioned me to write an operetta, and I've written you in as the leading lady.
Bing: Yeah, Peg, I've spent a lot of time up around Jasper Park in Lake Louise, and I was always so impressed with the beauty and grandeur there that I felt Abe should prepare a musical salute to the Canadian Rockies. Milton DeLugg is ready with his accordion, I see. Will you set the scene, Mr. B?
Abe: Right, Mr. C. ......

2. The Canadian Rockies Sketch
3. Preamble To "Louisa From Lake Louise"
Abe: I got here an operetta about Jasper National Park. In this story, Bing Crosby plays a ranger, Peggy Lee plays the mountain heroine, and John Scott Trotter plays the mountain. I play the part of Pierre, a native guy. I'm a half Indian.
The operetta kicks into gear with a few scenes involving just Bing and Pierre. Eventually, the female heroine comes into play.
Abe: ... And they come to the shores of Lake Louise. And there in the clear they see a beautiful girl. She's lovely but wild. A child of nature. Upon seeing the men she's frightened and scurries down a gopher hole. Then as she shyly peeks out of the hole, the ranger approaches and speaks to her.
Bing: Pardon me, miss. I'm Captain Crosby of the Rangers. You are the most beautiful creature I have ever seen in a gopher hole. Do not be frightened of the woods__, lady; come out. Come, come, come now.
Peggy: You come in here, baby. It's cold outside!
Bing: How wonderful to see such pure, unspoiled loveliness. I'd love to hold you in my arms but, how will I ever even get you out of that gopher hole?
Peggy: It's a cinch. Your brother Everett gave me a grease job.
Bing: Ooh my. You know we'll hear from Mobile Lube or somebody. Tell me, dear, what is your name?
Peggy: Well, I'll tell you.
Bing: I'm listening.
Peggy Lee then launches into her rendition of Louisa From Lake Louise. The banter continues right afterwards.
Bing: Oh, Louisa, you are so lovely.
Peggy: You are pretty cute yourself. I've never met a stranger before.
Abe then sings, in operetta style, the words "some enchanted evening you will meet a ranger."
Due to some foot tracks, it is soon suspected that the mountain girl is not truly Louisa from Lake Louise but notorious mink snatcher Dorothy Collinsky Kate -- a fugitive fur poacher whom ranger Crosby is in charge of arresting. Fortunately, Piers, the half Indian guide clarifies the matter, letting the ranger now that the mountain gal really is Louisa, after all. Thus Bing decides to marry Louisa. For the story's so-called rousing finale, the entire cast sings "We Love The Canadian Rockies."

4. Preamble To "Maybe It's Because"
Bing: The Mssrs. Scott and Ruby have written a tune which I'm sure is destined to be one of the first big boxos of the season. Louis Armstrong has made a great record of it. So did my brother Bob and Marion Morgan. Here's Peggy Lee.


Date: September 28, 1949 (Broadcast Date) (Pre-taped 9/24)
Location: Studio B, CBS Playhouse, 1615 North Vine, Hollywood, California
Label: The Bing Crosby Show For Chesterfield (1st Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Milton De Lugg (pac), Abe Burrows, Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee (v), Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires {Conlon, Mack McLean, Loulie "Lily" Jean Norman, Charles Parlato, Gloria Wood} (bkv)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) Ophelia's Blues (I'm Sweet, Shy Ophelia) - 1:09(Abe Burrows)
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 549 — I've Got A Crush On You   (1995)
Avid Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Avc 876 — Peggy Lee ("The Essential Collection" Series)    (2007)
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) Everything Is OK In Denmark - 0:44(Abe Burrows)
c. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) You Are In Love With Someone - 2:42(Johnny Burke, Jimmy Van Heusen)
All titles on:
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscShow 2 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby Show   (1949)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 1770 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   






Photos

The Smokin' Hot Piper Series, continued. Part XXI.


Schedule

The episode's date of recording (Saturday, September 24) is given by both of my main Crosby sources (chronicler Malcolm Macfarlane, radio authority Lionel Pairpoint). No rehearsal date is given by either expert. Macfarlane adds the time for the recording activities 7:00-7:45 p.m.).


Personnel

1. Guests
Billed as the episode's two guests are "Miss Peggy Lee and Mr. Abe Burrows" -- in that order, which reverses the billing order from the previous episode, in which both guests also appeared. For more reversals, compare the two episodes' introductions of Peggy Lee, transcribed in this page under each session's Patter.

2. Solos and Duets
All above-listed performances are part of the episode's parodic sketch, written by guest Abe Burrows. "Ophelia's Blues" is a Peggy Lee solo, "You Are In Love With Someone" a duet with Bing Crosby, and "Everything Is O.K. In Denmark" a trio with Burrows.


Patter

1. Introduction Of Peggy Lee
Abe: Of course, for tonight I have a great operetta.
Bing: Oh, yeah. But first, Abe, I must introduce our leading lady. She's gliding by right here. Ladies and gentlemen, in order to upset Burrows in more ways than one, here's the lovely, talented, delightful, personable North Dakota nightingale Miss Peggy Lee.
Peggy: Hi, Bing. Hello, Abe.
Peggy: Hi, Peggy.
Abe: Hi here, Peggy. Gee, I'm glad to see ya. You know we are going to do another one of my operettas tonight?
Peggy: Oh, wonderful, Abe! I love to sing those songs of yours! I wouldn't miss it for the world!
Peggy [in an side to Bing]: Hey, Bing, I thought this character went back to New York.
Bing: Heads out tomorrow, I think.
Abe: Don't be too sure. I may get a picture! ....

2. Sketch: Hamlet, The Gay Musical
Bing: Folks, some time ago I tuned into a delightful evening program entitled Breakfast With Burrows and I heard an exciting musical comedy version of Shakespeare's Hamlet. I thought it might make a good musical for Paramount so I've asked Abe to rewrite to toot Peggy and myself and we are going to try it out tonight. Abe, take over, eh?
Hamlet is played by Bing Crosby, Ophelia by Peggy Lee, and Hamlet's friend Horatio by Abe. After Burrows sets the scene, and after some banter between the Burrows and Crosby characters, a musical number is sung by Crosby, Burrows, and The Rhyhmaires. Next, there is more banter and dialogue between the two male characters. Eventually, Ophelia is mentioned.
Bing: Wouldst I once again had the comforts of the arms of Ophelia, the sky-sweet Ophelia whose love I once possessed before I went to seek else's wares.
Abe: Hamlet, sweet prince, mon captain. She who approaches over yonder, down there."
Bing: Down there?
Abe: It is she -- Ophelia.
Bing: Aye, t'ist she indeed. She does not see us. (Calls her) Ophelia!! Ophelia! I am here!"
Peggy: Where are you!?
Bing: Here, in these tights, here!
Peggy: Ham.
Bing: Oh. Ah, beloved Ophelia, 'Tist sweet to hold you close again. Sing me the song you sang me when first we met.
Peggy: Stand by, ?bup.
Peggy Lee then sings "I'm Sweet Shy Ophelia."
Abe: Immediately after this song, Ophelia plunges into the lake to drown herself. And here we do a big underwater production number ... At the end of the number, Hamlet dives in and pulls Ophelia out of the water. As he drags her into the shore, he says ...
Bing: Sweet Ophelia. Are you alright?
Ophelia: Oh, Hamlet, you foolish boy. Don't you know I only went to South America with that poker player to make you jealous?
Abe: I know our dialogue doesn't make sense. No, no, it's alright; we had to make a big cut in the middle for a production number.
Bing: That was from left field!
Thus, in Burrows' version of Hamlet, Ophelia does not drown. She is one of the voices heard in the happy-go-lucky closing number "Everything Is OK In Denmark," whose last lines are partially molded after the hit tune "Ghost Riders In The Sky."

3. Prelude To "You Are In Love With Someone"
Bing: Peggy Lee and I are going to try to develop a little blend here, on the palette from Top O' The Morning.


Date: October 12, 1949 (Broadcast Date) (Pre-taped 9/19)
Location: CBS Playhouse, 1615 North Vine, Hollywood, California
Label: The Bing Crosby Show For Chesterfield (1st Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Loring "Red" Nichols (c), Perry Botkin, Jr. (g), Edwin "Buddy" Cole (p), Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee (v), Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires {Conlon, Mack McLean, Loulie "Lily" Jean Norman, Charles Parlato, Gloria Wood} (bkv)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) How It Lies, How It Lies, How It Lies - 1:43(Joseph F. "Sonny" Burke, Paul Francis Webster)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscShow 4 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby Show   (1949)
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) A Wonderful Guy - 1:43(Oscar Hammerstein II, Richard Rodgers)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscShow 4 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby Show   (1949)
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 549 — I've Got A Crush On You   (1995)
Sunflower Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Sun 2110 — Just the Way You Are {Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee}   (2005)
Avid Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Avc 876 — Peggy Lee ("The Essential Collection" Series)    (2007)
c. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) [Musical Commercial] Chesterfield Satisfies - 0:20(unknown)
unissued
d. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) I've Got A Crush On You - 1:57(Ira Gershwin, George Gershwin)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscShow 4 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby Show   (1949)
Sunflower Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Sun 2110 — Just the Way You Are {Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee}   (2005)
e. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) Again - 2:08(Dorcas Cochran, Lionel Newman)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscShow 4 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby Show   (1949)
Sunflower Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Sun 2110 — Just the Way You Are {Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee}   (2005)





Photos

The Smokin' Hot Piper Series, continued. Part XXII.


Schedule

The episode's date of recording is given as Sunday, September 18 by Crosby radio authority Lionel Pairpoint. For his part, Crosby chronicler Malcolm Macfarlane mentions two days of recording activity, September 18 and 19. No rehearsal date is given by either expert. Macfarlane adds that, during those two days, the contents for two episodes featuring Peggy Lee and Abe Burrows were transcribed. (The other episode has been broadcast on September 21.)


The Show

This show is inordinately music-packed, with only brief talk and no audible audience except at the very end. At the start, rather than having his usual long banter with Ken Carpenter, Bing exchanges just a couple of lines with him, and summons Peggy Lee right away. He then announces the tune "How It Lies, How It Lies, How It Lies," and gets right down to sing it with her.

The same patter applies to the episode's other songs; at most, Crosby offers one basic detail about them -- most frequently, the names of the songwriters, or the Broadway show source. For instance: "No such Sängerfest as this would be complete without a little Gershwin. And ... that's what we have; it's a little Gerswhin, I've Got A Crush On You. Peg, could you, uh, start it for us?"

There are two promotional Chesterfield commercials, involving Carpenter and Crosby, but little in the way of banter is heard throughout. Lee's involvement is limited to singing and to a few quick words, including an invitation for Crosby to do a song from the musical/movie South Pacific that he had performed in the show before ("A Cock-eyed Optimist").


Personnel

1. Guest
The episode's only guest is, as Ken Carpenter bills her, "Miss Peggy Lee."

2. Solos and Duets
"A Wonderful Guy" is a Peggy Lee solo vocal. All other numbers are duets with Crosby. In this episode, "How It Lies, How It Lies, How It Lies" was being performed for a third time; the second performance (also a Crosby-Lee duet) had been broadcast on May 11, 1949, and the first (a Crosby solo) on April 27, 1949. Another repeat number was the duet "I've Got A Crush On You," previously performed on a February 11, 1948 broadcast and to be performed by Lee for a third time -- though as a solo -- in a future broadcast (November 15, 1953).

3. Rhythm Section
Bing Crosby identifies Red Nichols, Buddy Cole, and Perry Botkin Sr. as the players in one of his solo renditions. Since all three men were regular members of the show, their participation in the other selections can be tentatively assumed. This assumption is shaky, however, in the case of Red Nichols; his cornet (or, according to Crosby, "his torrid trumpet") is clearly present in the Crosby solo but not easily audible in the other selections.

Songs

1. "Chesterfield Satisfies"
I have given the title "Chesterfield Satisfies" to one of this episode's commercials. That title is entirely my own invention (though based on my listening of the lyrics, of course). The sources at hand show no particular title for it, other than the generic "Chesterfield Jingle."


Date: October 19, 1949 (Broadcast Date) (Pre-taped 10/10)
Location: San Francisco, California
Label: The Bing Crosby Show For Chesterfield (1st Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee (v), Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires {Conlon, Mack McLean, Loulie "Lily" Jean Norman, Charles Parlato, Gloria Wood} (bkv)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) It's More Fun Than A Picnic - 2:22(Harold Adamson, Jimmy McHugh)
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) I Gotta Right To Sing The Blues - 1:54(Harold Arlen, Ted Koehler)
Sunflower Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Sun 2110 — Just the Way You Are {Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee}   (2005)
Both titles on:
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscShow 5 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby Show   (1949)





Photos

The Smokin' Hot Piper Series, continued. Part XXIII.


Schedule

The episode's location city (San Francisco) date of recording (Monday, October 10) are given by both of my main Crosby sources (chronicler Malcolm Macfarlane, radio authority Lionel Pairpoint). No rehearsal date is given by either expert.


Personnel

1. Guests
Peggy Lee and Frank Fay are billed as the episode's guests.

2. Solos And Duets
"I Gotta Right To Sing The Blues" is a Peggy Lee solo, "It's More fun Than A Picnic" a Crosby-Lee medley.


Patter

1. Introduction of Peggy Lee And Banter
Bing (after his customary conversation with Ken): But enough of our personal peccadilloes. Matters of national importance engage our attention this evening. For instance, at the moment, Peggy Lee moves in.
Peggy: Hi, Bing.
Bing: Peggy, isn't it nice staying in San Francisco again?
Peggy: Aah, it sure is -- a great town; love it. You know, Bing ...
Bing: Hmm?
Peggy: I had the same room at the St. Francis Hotel that I had way back last winter.
Bing: The same room -- in a big, big hotel like that -- you had months and months ago. How could a thing like that happen?
Peggy: I forgot to check out.
Bing: Oooh baby, you are gonna have a hotel bill that will be a ?piff.
Peggy: Yeah, I bet it cost me a lot of cabbage.
Bing: Well, if the St. Francis will take lettuce, I might be able to help you! [The lettuce comment is a reference to remarks made earlier, during Crosby's banter with Ken Carpenter.] Peg, what do you say we hear a little music?
Peggy: Okay.


Songs

1. "It's More Fun Than A Picnic"
Bing Crosby identifies this song as originating in Mike Todd's then-new Broadway show As The Girls Go.

2. "I Gotta Right To Sing The Blues"
Before Peggy Lee starts singing this number, Bing Crosby declares that "when Peggy Lee sings the blues, [??hundreds ?and ?such ?matters] rise and face New Orleans reverently." Her solo rendition of this tune is met with enthusiastic applause and with more appreciative words from Crosby. After she finishes and as the audience applauds, he adds: "Oh my, that was real rad. Thank you, Peggy; that was wonderful." In years to come, the Harold Arlen classic would be often reprised by Lee in concerts, on television, and on radio transcriptions.


Date: November 23, 1949 (Broadcast Date) (Pre-taped 11/17)
Location: CBS Playhouse, 1615 North Vine, Hollywood, California
Label: The Bing Crosby Show For Chesterfield (1st Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Cy Bernard (str, vn), Harry Bluestone aka Blostein, Raoul Poliakin, Joe Venuti (vn), Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee (v), Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires {Conlon, Mack McLean, Loulie "Lily" Jean Norman, Charles Parlato, Gloria Wood} (bkv)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) A Thousand Violins - 3:16(Raymond B. "Ray" Evans, Jay Livingston)
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) 'Way Back Home - 3:29(Al Lewis, Tom L "Ted" Waring)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscP 2629 - P 2630 — Basic Music Library [7 Bing Crosby vocals, 2 of them duets with Peggy Lee]   (1952)
Both titles on:
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscShow 10 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby Show   (1949)
Biac Collectors' Label LP(Belgium) Brad 10 530-531 — At Their Rarest Of All Rare Performances {Al Jolson, Peggy Lee}    (1976)
Sunflower Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Sun 2110 — Just the Way You Are {Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee}   (2005)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 1772 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   





Photo

Peggy Lee with violinist Joe Venuti. The cropped version of the photo was published in February of 1949, but the shot itself is likelier to have been taken some time between 1945 and 1947. (My educated guess leans toward 1947.)


Schedule

The episode's taping date (Thursday, November 17) is given by both of my main Crosby sources (chronicler Malcolm Macfarlane, radio authority Lionel Pairpoint). No rehearsal date is given by either expert.


Personnel

1. Guests
Frank Fay is billed as the episode's guest. Peggy Lee is mentioned last among cast members: "The Bing Crosby Show produced and transcribed in Hollywood, with John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra, Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires, Peggy Lee, and Bing's guest Frank Fay."

2. Solos an Duets
Peggy Lee sang no solos during this broadcast. Both of the above-listed performances are Lee-Crosby duets.

3. Strings
Before the episode's performance of "A Thousand Violins," Bing Crosby jokingly claims that he has engaged the services of one thousand violinists. The violinists are then heard marching in, as if they were soldiers called for duty. Crosby proceeds to call the violinists by name: Joe Venuti, Harry Bluestone, Cy Bernard, Richard Rezzo, Raoul Poliakin, Rocoonins Putnam, ?Gosha ?Hishem. (Peggy Lee interrupts at that point, and no other names are mentioned.) The last two violinist names seem to be made-up ones, meant to elicit laughs, but the earlier names belong to actual musicians, and have thus been tentatively included in this session's personnel.


Patter

1. Introduction To "A Thousand Violins"
Bing: Mr. Toby ?Garin, Paramount Studios' roving ambassador of song, is currently plugging a tune called A Thousand Violins. He's threatened to let air out of my tires if I don't sing it. Well, we scheduled a thousand violins for the night and in line with our policy to make everything authentic on The Chesterfield Show, we have engaged the services of one thousand violinists. [Audience laughter.] Why do you laugh?
Soon afterwards, Bing starts to call out violinists' name (as explained above, under Personnel, point #3). Eventually, Peggy Lee interrupts.
Peggy: Are you kidding?!?
Bing: Why, Peggy. Peggy Lee, folks! [Audience applause.] What on earth are you doing there with all those violinists?
Peggy: Well, I was just walking down the hall and I guess they decided to string along.
Bing: Oh, there's ... Oooh, girl.
[Some audience members laugh.]
Bing: Never saw you with so many beaus. Ahem.
[Some audience members laugh again.]
Bing: You see what happened, Peggy. I was just about to sing A Thousand Violins from Bob Hope's next picture The Great Lover.
Peggy: Oh, The Great Lover.
Bing: Um-hmm.
Peggy: That must be a comedy.
Bing: With a title like that, what do you think?
[Audience laughter.]
Bing: But this song from the picture is really a nice song. Do you want to join me?
Peggy: I'd love to.
Bing: Here we go. A Thousand Violins. John Scott, let the rousing Ferly fly.

2. Preamble To " 'Way Back Home"
Bing: With Thanksgiving coming on and all, Peggy and I thought Way Back Home would be an appropriate selection.


Date: December 7, 1949 (Broadcast Date) (Pre-taped 12/03)
Location: CBS Playhouse, 1615 North Vine, Hollywood, California
Label: The Bing Crosby Show For Chesterfield (1st Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee (v), Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires {Conlon, Mack McLean, Loulie "Lily" Jean Norman, Charles Parlato, Gloria Wood} (bkv)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) Here Comes Santa Claus - 3:03(Gene Autry, Oakley Haldeman)
Varèse Sarabande Licensed CD302 066 848 2 — [Bing Crosby] A Crosby Christmas; Songs From His Classic Radio Broadcasts    (2007)
Collectors' Choice Licensed CDCcm 2161 — [Bing Crosby] The Crosby Christmas Sessions    (2010)
Sonoma Entertainment Licensed CDSbx2 0385 — [Bing Crosby] Christmas   (2011)
Somerset Group Entertainment Licensed CD(Canada) 55580 — [Bing Crosby] Christmas Favorites   (2011)
CAPITOL©Universal DigitalAudio/LP/CDB 0032274 01/ 02ULTIMATE CHRISTMAS   (2020)
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) Mañana [Christmas Version] - 2:23(Dave Barbour, Peggy Lee)
Sunflower Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Sun 2110 — Just the Way You Are {Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee}   (2005)
c. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) Stay Well - 3:21(Maxwell Anderson, Kurt Weill)
Sunflower Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Sun 2110 — Just the Way You Are {Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee}   (2005)
All titles on:
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscShow 12 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby Show   (1949)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 1057 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   





Photos

Everybody get ready for some scenery chewing. Here is the show's host, in dueling mode, and his two guests, fully decked in Western regalia. (For an explanation or context, see under Patter sub-section below.) Second image: an autographed photo of Peggy Lee, dedicated to Diane ("so wonderful seeing you again"). In addition to the present episode from 1949, Cassidy and Lee would join Crosby the following year, for an episode taped on December the 9th and broadcast on December the 13th.

This photo is actually one of several publicity shots which tend to bear October 5, 1949 stamps. Lee's look and gown suggest that the pic was taken in or around the filming of her cameo scene for the Bing Crosby vehicle Mr. Music. Although that movie did not premiere until January 1951, announcements of Lee's involvement were made as early as November 1949, and the cameo is known to have been filmed on November 22, 1949, with pics showing Crosby and Lee in their garb circulating in the press already by January 1950.


Schedule

The episode's date of recording (Saturday, December 3) is given by both of my main Crosby sources (chronicler Malcolm Macfarlane, radio authority Lionel Pairpoint). No rehearsal date is given by either expert.


Personnel

1.Guests
Ken Carpenter bills the episode's guests as "Miss Peggy Lee and Hopalong Cassidy."

2. Solos an Duets
Peggy Lee did no solo vocals during this broadcast. All three above-listed performances are duets with Crosby.


Songs

1. "Mañana"
This version of "Mañana" sets the original music to new lyrics, also penned by Peggy Lee. Once again, the lyrics are mainly about procrastination. This time, Christmas shopping is the task that is subjected to delays.

2. "Stay Well"
Before this duet performance, Bing Crosby makes the point of identifying "Stay Well" as "a new song from a new Broadway show ... Lost In The Stars ..."


Patter

1. Banter
When Ken Carpenter informs Peggy Lee that Hopalong Cassidy is guesting, she exclaims, "well, I thought so; look out there in the audience!" Mooing cows are immediately heard. For his part, Bing Crosby has taken on a cowboy attitude, due only in part to Hopalong Cassidy's presence. According to Peggy Lee, Crosby has actually been acting strangely ever since he recorded "Mule Train." She is then heard squealing; Crosby has supposedly whipped her with his flip, apparently taking her for a mule. [This is an instance of one of the occasionally chauvinistic jokes from this show's scripts.] Bing Crosby next says, though, "Pardon me, Peggy, my flip whipped ... I mean, my whip flipped!"

2. Western Film With Cassidy, Crosby, And Lee
During his scripted chatter with Cassidy, the host makes allusion to a "rumor going around in Paramount that the two of us are doing a western." The so-called rumor seems to have been more than a script's conceit to set up the ensuing sketch: according to reports from contemporary movie magazines, Crosby and Cassidy were truly slated to do such Western, with Peggy Lee as the leading lady. (Lee's involvement is not mentioned at all during the episode, but it receives mention elsewhere. See photo above. Perhaps mention of her involvement was not deemed necessary, or perhaps she was not officially enrolled yet. In any case, this movie project did not come to fruition, allegedly due to the film company's unwillingness to pay the high fee demanded by Boyd.)

3. Sketch: The Ripsnortin,’ Arizona Saga
In the episode's sketch, new-in-town Hopalong Cassidy and villainous "Wildcat" Crosby play rivals. Peggy Lee is briefly heard as a reproving lady from whom Hoppy has been taking dancing lessons, and to whom he had refused to supply with payment. (This bit with Lee goes nowhere. It just gives her an opportunity to be part of the sketch, and to act out the role -- adopting a voice and attitude suitable to the character.)

4. Closing Remarks
Bing: Thank you, Peggy. My profound thanks to Peggy Lee and Hopalong Cassidy for joining us for this night.
Peggy: Thanks, Bing.
After Hopalong Cassidy expresses his enjoyment of his visit as a guest, and after Peggy Lee asks Bing Crosby who will be his guests on the following week, the goodbyes continue:
Bing: Good night, Peg.
Peggy: Good night, Bing.
Bing: Good night, Hopalong.
Hopalong: Good night, Creepalong. See you at Paramount.


Date: January 11, 1950 (Broadcast Date) (Pre-taped, Date Unknown)
Location: CBS Playhouse, 1615 North Vine, Hollywood, California
Label: The Bing Crosby Show For Chesterfield (1st Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra, Other Individuals Unknown (acc), Warren Baker, Julian "Matty" Matlock, Lawrence "Larry" Wright (r), Loring "Red" Nichols (cl), Robert "Bobby" Guy (t), Wendell "Gus" Mayhew (tb), Perry Botkin, Jr. (g), Mel Henke (p), Nick Fatool (d), Mayer Oberman, Raoul Poliakin (vn), Cy Bernard (vc), Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee (v), Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires {Conlon, Mack McLean, Loulie "Lily" Jean Norman, Charles Parlato, Gloria Wood} (bkv)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) Little Jack Frost, Get Lost - 1:55(Seger Ellis, Al Stillman)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscP 2629 - P 2630 — Basic Music Library [7 Bing Crosby vocals, 2 of them duets with Peggy Lee]   (1952)
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) When You Speak With Your Eyes - 2:18(Peggy Lee, Dave Barbour, Rene Touzet)
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 549 — I've Got A Crush On You   (1995)
Avid Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Avc 876 — Peggy Lee ("The Essential Collection" Series)    (2007)
Both titles on:
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscShow 17 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby Show   (1950)
Sunflower Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Sun 2110 — Just the Way You Are {Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee}   (2005)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 1774 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   





Photos

The Smokin' Hot Piper Series, continued. Part XXIV.


Schedule

The episode's date of recording (Saturday, December 31) is given by Crosby chronicler Malcolm Macfarlane. Crosby radio authority Lionel Pairpoint does not offer a recording date. No rehearsal date is given by either expert.


Masters And Issues

1. "Little Jack Frost, Get Lost"
Crosby and company took a test pressing of this duet performance to Decca Records, where it was mastered and subsequently released commercially, as a Decca 78/45 rpm single. The company's log sheets list the performance under its presumed mastering date, November 17, 1952. In this discography, the two versions (i.e., the performance as it was broadcast and the performance after it was mastered) are treated as two separate (although obviously closely related) entities.


Personnel

1. Guests
Peggy Lee and Groucho Marx are this episode's guests.

2. Solos And Duets
"Little Jack Frost, Get Lost" is a Crosby-Lee duet. (Crosby had also sung it solo twice, for the January 19 and February 2, 1949 episodes of his previous series, Philco Radio Time.) "When You Speak With Your Eyes" is a Peggy Lee solo.

3. Tentative Full Personnel
For most episodes of The Bing Crosby For Chesterfield, including this one, personnel details are unknown to me. Al Jolson's presence as a guest is the main factor that accounts for the availability of full personnel in a few cases. Personnel details for such Jolson episodes can be found in The Red Nichols Story: After Intermission, 1942-1965, written by Philip R. Evans, Stanley Hester, Stephen Hester, and Linda Evans. (The authors' own source probably was an Al Jolson discography. Personnel for episodes with Louis Armstrong as guest are also more easily available.) Although Peggy Lee did not appear in any Crosby show episodes featuring Jolson, we can surmise that the personnel for contemporaneous broadcasts by Jolson and Lee was somewhat similar. Here is the personnel listed by Evans et al for the show's January 4, 1950 episode:

Warren Baker, Den Eckles, Matty Matlock, Abe Most, Larry Wright (r)
Robert Guy, George Seaberg (t)
Joe Howard, Wendell "Gus" Mayhew, William Schaefer (tb)
Loring "Red" Nichols (cl)
Perry Botkin (g)
Mel Henke (p)
Phil Stephens (sb)
Nick Fatool (d)
George Kast, Tony Loscalzo, Mayer Oberman, Nick Pisani, Raoul Poliakin, Mischa Russell (vn)
Sam Freed (vl)
Cy Bernard (vc)
William "Billy" May (arr)

4. Decca's Five-Episode Personnel
"Little Jack Frost, Get Lost" is one of five Crosby radio performances that were remastered and commercially released by Decca, the record label to which the crooner was signed. The five performances come from different episodes, some of them years apart. Despite the temporal gap, those five radio performances are listed together in Decca's files, probably because they were mastered (or chosen for mastering) on the same day. Accordingly, Decca's log sheets list the personnel from the five episodes collectively, as one big lump, without any clarification as to who played on which episode. The unseemly results include, for instance, the listing of three pianists.

I have not entered that variegated 5-episode personnel herein. However, I have checked it against the personnel described in point #3 above. The following musicians are listed in both sources:

Warren Baker, Matty Matlock, Larry Wright (r)
Robert Guy (t)
Wendell "Gus" Mayhew (tb)
Loring "Red" Nichols (cl)
Perry Botkin (g)
Mel Henke (p)
Nick Fatool (d)
Mayer Oberman, Raoul Poliakin (vl)
Cy Bernard (vc)
[bass, violas: no names shared by the two sources]


5. Reconstruction Of A Partial Personnel
After comparing the personnel listings from the two above-described sources, I have decided to enter in this session those names that were common to both sources. The entered personnel should of course be deemed tentative and partial.


Patter

1. Preamble To "Little Jack Frost Get Lost"
Bing: Well, here's Peggy! Peggy Lee, folks.
[Audience applause.]
Peggy: Hi Bing, Ken.
Bing: Peggy, if you are ready, I think we should get on with the opeing selection, a little song called Little Jack Frost Get Lost. The tune seems to be enjoying something of a revival this season. John Scott, boys and girls, let's frost up the place here.

2. Preamble To "When You Speak With Your Eyes"
Bing: Peggy Lee and I return to sing a new song called When You Speak With Your Eyes. Peggy has fashioned some very nice lyrics to go with the ____'s popular Latin melody. In fact, Peggy has a new record out on this, right, Peggy?
Peggy: Yes, that's right.

3. Banter With Groucho Marx
Guest Groucho Marx has co-written a song called "The Look In Your Eyes," which Bing was supposed to have sung, but hasn't yet. (The co-writers are said to be Harry Ruby and, more to the point, Grouch Marx's own wife.) Since Crosby has not sung the number, Marx's disappointed wife has thrown him and his chihuahua out of the house.
Bing: I'm going to help you with the song. I'll get Peggy Lee to do it. Oh, Peggy!
Peggy: Yes, Bing. Oh, hi, Groucho.
Groucho: Hi.
Peggy: What are you doing here?
Groucho: If you paid attention, you wouldn't have asked that silly question. [Laughter from Peggy and the audience.] What am I doing here? We've been standing in the dry sun since 1:00 o'clock. Come to think of it, what am I doing here?? [ ... ]
Bing: Peggy, Groucho's got a very big problem. He's living in his garage and it's very dry.
Groucho: Garage, eh? [apparently finding Bing's first-syllable accentuation of the word unusual and pretentious] Is that from Gonzaga?
Peggy: Oooh. Well, maybe I could go in and hand curtains for him in the garage.
Groucho: Peggy, if my wife catches you in the garage, it will be curtains for me. But if you are coming by there, bring some chilli. My chihuahua needs refueling.
Peggy: Oh, you got one of those old-fashioned chihuahuas you have to feed with chilli?
Groucho: Yeah. (Groucho aside: Nice line. That's the one line I put in. Tell 'em I fixed up the script.)
[Audience laughter.]
Peggy: Why don't you get the new type, ah?
Groucho: (in an aside to Peggy) Take it from chihuahua.
[Audience laughs even louder. Bing says something in the background, causing even more laughter.]
Peggy: Why don't you get the new type? You just plug them in, like electric blankets.
Groucho; Well, I got one of those electric blankets. I plug it in the wall and in a minute the whole wall is as warm as toast.
Bing: Great to sleep in the wall.
Groucho: It's better than coffee. But Crosby, I can't use this girl -- for the song, that is.
Peggy: What song?
[Audience laughter.]
Groucho: Forget the song. I've got bigger plans for you.
[Audience laughter.]
Grouch: I'm gonna hose you up until next summer. I'm gonna rub grease on you and have you swim the English Channel.
Peggy: But, but Groucho I'm not gonna swim the saw -- swim the ... ha, ha!! [Peggy and the audience laugh at her faux pas. She also utters exclamatory interjection -- aiii yooo.]
Groucho: Go back to chihuahua.
[More audience laughter.]
Groucho; I'm gonna rub grease on you and have you swim the English Channel.
Peggy: But, Groucho I'm not gonna swim the channel. I can't swim!
Groucho: You mean the grease job is out, too?
Bing: You are making a mistake, Groucho. You oughtta let Peggy sing the song.
Peggy: Bing, why don't you sing? I'd like to hear it myself.
Groucho: Go ahead, Bing. Sing it.
Bing: Well, maybe I'll give it an once over lightly. If your wife, huh ... Has she got an arrangement?
Groucho: Yeah, she's in the house and I'm still living in the garage.
Bing: I must say it's not a very good arrangement.
After a few additional lines of banter, Crosby sings the number.


Date: January 25, 1950 (Broadcast Date) (Pre-taped 1/18)
Location: Marines Memorial Theatre, San Francisco, California
Label: The Bing Crosby Show For Chesterfield (1st Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Perry Botkin, Jr. (g), Edwin "Buddy" Cole (p), Nick Fatool (d), Joe Venuti (vn), Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee (v), Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires {Conlon, Mack McLean, Loulie "Lily" Jean Norman, Charles Parlato, Gloria Wood} (bkv)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) Sunshine Cake - 3:28(Johnny Burke, Jimmy Van Heusen)
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) I'm Comin', Virginia - 2:02(Will Marion Cook, Donald Heywood)
Jazz Unlimited Collectors' Label CD(Denmark) Jucd 2034 — [Bing Crosby] Having Fun; Bing & Louis   (1997)
Storyville Collectors' Label (Denmk) CD(Denmark) 1038405 — [Bing Crosby] Bing & Louis; Having Fun    (2007)
Both titles on:
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscShow 19 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby Show   (1950)
Sunflower Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Sun 2110 — Just the Way You Are {Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee}   (2005)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 1059 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   





Photos

The Smokin' Hot Piper Series, continued. Part XXV. A free-ranging Bing, happy to be photographed in all his follicularly challenged glory.


Schedule

The episode's date of recording (Wednesday, January 18) is given by Crosby chronicler Malcolm Macfarlane. Crosby radio authority Lionel Pairpoint does not offer a recording date. No rehearsal date is given by either expert.


Location

For brief commentary about Crosby's Chesterfield sojourns to San Francsico, see the notes in the introductory Chesterfield section above (preceding the September 21, 1949 broadcast).


Personnel

1. Guests
Ken Carpenter announces the episode's guests as "Peggy Lee, Joe Venuti, Jack Teagarden, and Louis Armstrong." Lee does interact with Venuti (as detailed below) but not with Armstrong or Teagarden. (Furthermore, Teagarden does not exchange words with Crosby, despite being featured in his own solo. Armstrong does interact with Crosby -- at length.)

2. Solos And Duets
"I'm Comin', Virginia" is a Peggy Lee solo. "Sunshine Cake" is a Crosby-Lee duet. The pair would reprise "Sunshine Cake" during Lee's next guest appearance (February 8, 1950).


Cross-refeerences

See also photos (and thee notes about them) under the broadcast dated March 16, 1949.


Patter

1. Banter
During their customary chat at the start of the show, Bing Crosby and Ken Carpenter remark about a trait that Crosby and some of the episode's guests share: they are former members of Paul Whiteman's orchestra. This episode is a Paul Whiteman alumni mini-reunion, they conclude.
Bing: Well, here's Peggy Lee! Hi ya, Peg.
Peggy: Hi, boys.
[Strong audience applause.]
Bing: Hey, Peggy. Are you a Paul Whiteman graduate, too?
Peggy: Well, no, I'm from the Benny Goodman school of hard knocks.
Bing: Hey, here comes the indigestion king, Joe Venuti.
[Crosby and Carpenter had previously made a joke about the existence of a Joe Venuti vending machine that "dishes out Italian food." More banter on the same topic ensues.]
Peggy: Hey, I saw one of Joe's machines.
Bing: You are kidding. What did they look like, Peg?
Peggy: Well, the one I saw looked something like a big jukebox, only instead of records Joe had long-playing pizza pies stacked in.
Joe: And we use a wet noodle for a needle.

2. Preamble To "Sunshine Cake"
Bing: Now, Joe, if you skip out in the green room, Peggy and I will get to the opening number. It's a jumpy little thing called "Sunshine Cake" and it happens to be from a forthcoming Paramount picture in which I'm involved, called Ridin' High. John Scott, let's get it cooking, huh?"

3. Preamble To "I'm Comin' Virginia"
Bing: Now we are very happy tonight, very lucky too, to have Peggy Lee aboard because her blues message is that great song I'm Comin' Virginia. And folks, when Peggy sings the blues, you are gonna hear the truth. Every word -- the truth.
After Peggy Lee finishes and as strong applause is heard, Crosby adds, "hhmmh. Sings the whole book."


Date: February 8, 1950 (Broadcast Date) (Pre-taped 2/1)
Location: Probably The Marines Theater Memorial, 609 Sutter Street , San Francisco, California
Label: The Bing Crosby Show For Chesterfield (1st Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee (v), Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires {Conlon, Mack McLean, Loulie "Lily" Jean Norman, Charles Parlato, Gloria Wood} (bkv)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) Sunshine Cake - 3:20(Johnny Burke, Jimmy Van Heusen)
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) A Dream Is A Wish Your Heart Makes - 2:24(Mack David, Al Hoffman, Jay Livingston)
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 549 — I've Got A Crush On You   (1995)
Sunflower Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Sun 2110 — Just the Way You Are {Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee}   (2005)
Avid Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Avc 876 — Peggy Lee ("The Essential Collection" Series)    (2007)
Both titles on:
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscShow 21 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby Show   (1950)
Biac Collectors' Label LP(Belgium) Brad 10 530-531 — At Their Rarest Of All Rare Performances {Al Jolson, Peggy Lee}    (1976)
HLC CDHlc 6650 — [Bing Crosby] Bing & Al, Volume 3   (2001)
Soundco Collectors' Label 8-track cartridgeOrs 4 — [Bing Crosby] Soundco Presents The Bing Crosby Show (Starring Bing Crosby, With Fred Allen & Peggy Lee)   
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 1060 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   





Photos

The Smokin' Hot Piper Series, continued. Part XXVI.


Schedule

The episode's date of recording (Wednesday, February 1) given by Crosby chronicler Malcolm Macfarlane. Crosby radio authority Lionel Pairpoint does not offer a recording date. Both experts cite San Francisco as the location city, but neither offers rehearsal detail.


Personnel

1. Guests
in the words of announcer Ken Carpenter at the start of the program, "Miss Peggy Lee and Mr. Fred Allen" are the episode's guests. "This being boy scout week," Carpenter adds, "it gives me great pleasure to present a former boy who is still a good scout, Bing Crosby." Making previously unannounced appearances at the end of the show are Al Jolson and Portland Hoffa (the latter being Fred Allen's wife, as well as his comedy partner). Peggy Lee does not interact with the other guests.

2. Solos And Duets
"A Dream Is A Wish That Your Heart Makes" serves as Peggy Lee's solo for this episode. "Sunshine Cake" is a reprise of a duet that Crosby and Lee had first attempted during her previous guest appearance, broadcast on January 25, 1950.


Songs

1. "Sunshine Cake"
Smartly Inserted in the middle of this performance are the following promotional lines: "Put on your slippers / Light up a Chesterfield cigarette."


Patter

1. Banter With Bing Crosby
Bing: Look who's here, our favorite girl scout, Peggy Lee.
Peggy: Hi, fellows.
Bing: Hey, Peggy, you are still playing at the Venetian Room at the Fairmont, n'est pas?
Peggy: Oh, yes, I am. But I gotta get back to Hollywood soon ...
Bing: What's the matter?
Peggy: Well, a big producer flew up here and asked me to do a picture.
Bing: Oh, wonderful. That's quite a break.
Peggy: Um-hmm. You may know him. He's with Paramount.
Bing: Who's this?
Peggy: His name is Barney Dean.
Bing: Ahem. Peg, I don't wanna upset you or anything but, uh, I know Barney Dean. He is not a producer.
[Laughter from the audience.]
Peggy: Oh, but he must be, Bing! He even invited me to his hotel to audition tonight.
Bing: Don't go. [Loud laughter from the audience.] Do not go.
Peggy: Why not??
Bing: It's a trap. I know how this fellow operates. He gets you up on his hotel room under false pretenses, he gives you a great buildup, calls room service to send up a bottle of rum or wine, showers you with attention, and then when your head is reeling, he strikes.
Peggy: Oh, noo.
Bing: Yep. Before you know it, you've signed up an order for 300 Christmas cards.
[Audience laughter.]
Peggy: Oh, Bing, that upsets me terribly.
Bing: I don't see why; you've got Christmas cards.
Peggy: Oh, gee, I never looked at it that way.
Bing: You see, there's a bright side to everything, Peggy. Buck up now. Let's carry into the opening number, which happens to be Sunshine Cake from the forthcoming Paramount picture Ridin' High. John Scott, boys and girls, let's make this cake, huh?

2. Preamble To "A Dream Is A Wish Your Heart Makes"
Bing: The new Walt Disney picture Cinderella is just full of good tunes. Peggy Lee wants to do a ballad for you now.
"Very pretty, Peggy," adds Crosby after Lee finishes performing, and as the audience applauds.


Date: December 13, 1950 (Broadcast Date) (Pre-taped 12/09)
Location: CBS Playhouse, 1615 North Vine, Hollywood, California
Label: The Bing Crosby Show For Chesterfield (2nd Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee (v), Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires {Conlon, Mack McLean, Loulie "Lily" Jean Norman, Charles Parlato, Gloria Wood} (bkv)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) A Bushel And A Peck - 2:33(Frank Loesser)
Sunflower Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Sun 2110 — Just the Way You Are {Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee}   (2005)
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) Orange-colored Sky - 2:07(Milton DeLugg, Willie Stein, uncredited Frank Loesser)
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 549 — I've Got A Crush On You   (1995)
Sunflower Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Sun 2110 — Just the Way You Are {Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee}   (2005)
Avid Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Avc 876 — Peggy Lee ("The Essential Collection" Series)    (2007)
c. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) Silver Bells - 2:01(Raymond B. "Ray" Evans, Jay Livingston)
Varèse Sarabande Licensed CD302 066 848 2 — [Bing Crosby] A Crosby Christmas; Songs From His Classic Radio Broadcasts    (2007)
All titles on:
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscShow 46 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby Show   (1950)
Critter Jablon Collectors' Label LPCbhc 8901 — [Bing Crosby] Bing & Hoppy   (1973)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 1240 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   






Photos

The Smokin' Hot Piper Series, continued. Part XXVII.


Schedule

The episode's date of recording (Saturday, December 9) is given by both of my main Crosby sources (chronicler Malcolm Macfarlane, radio authority Lionel Pairpoint). Macfarlane also identifies the recording building. No rehearsal date is given by either expert.


Personnel

1. Guests
Hopalong Cassidy and Peggy Lee are billed as this episode's guests.

2. Solos And Duets
"Orange-colored Sky" is a Peggy Lee solo. The other above-listed numbers are duets with Crosby.


Patter

1. Banter
Ken Carpenter: And now, ladies and gentlemen, it gives me great pleasure to present that famous hero of the Old West, Bing Crosby.
Bing (affecting a cowboy accent): Thank you, Ken. I'm glad you remembered I was a hero of the Old West. I shouted it out with plenty of rustlers in my day.
Ken: Easy, now. Steady, boy. When I said you were the hero of the old West, I was referring back to the days when you were such a hit as a singer at the Cocoanut Grove.
Bing (still affecting a cowboy accent): Well, I shouted it out with many a rustler right in the Cocoanut Grove.
[Audience laughter. Crosby then returns to his normal voice.]
Bing: Ken, I don't think we should be standing here, though, yakking about the Cocoanut Grove in the old days when we have the star of the current show at the Cocoanut Grove right here. Ladies and gentlemen, Miss Peggy Lee.
[Whistles are heard amidst the audience applause.]
Peggy (affecting a cowboy accent when she says her first "hi"): Hi! Hi, boys.
Bing: Move right in here, Peg.
Peggy: I'm moving.
Bing: Give her room, Ken.
Peggy: Hey Peggy, I caught your show at the Cocoanut Grove the other night. Really great.
Bing: Oh, this girl's got it. Got it.
Peggy: Thank you. Say, Ken, did you hear about the telegram Bing sent me on my opening night?
Ken: No, no. What did he say?
Bing: Just a little wire; 't was nothing important.
Ken: Oh, come on. What did it say, Peg?
Peggy: Well, I have it right here. It says, "Peggy Lee, Cocoanut Grove. I left there rather hurriedly in 1930. Would you please pick up my laundry?"
Ken: Bing, when you send a wire to someone on opening night, you are supposed to wire congratulations and good luck. Of course, it's none of my business.
Bing: You are right, Ken: it's none of your business. Did you get the laundry, Peggy?
Peggy: Yes, I put it in it your dressing room.
Bing: How much do I owe you?
Peggy: 18 cents.
Bing: I thought I left two shirts there. Well ...
Peggy: Say, by the way, Bing, a laundryman said to tell you that your shirt needs repairing.
Bing: It does? Why?
Peggy: Well, he dropped a cigarette on it, and the celluloid collar went up in smoke.
Bing: Well, if it wasn't a Chesterfield, I'm suing.
Peggy: Oh, he told me to be sure to tell that it was a Chesterfield.
Bing: Well, that's alright then. Peg, now that we've got all our business taken care of, what do you say we get on with our opening number, that little affair called A Bushel And A Peck?
Peggy: I'm ready.

2. Preamble To "Orange-colored Sky"
Bing: Now, folks, Peggy Lee again. __ Peggy Lee is going to sing the current hit Orange-colored Sky. Are you ready to slam, bam and alakazam, Peg?
Peggy: Oh, yes. I feel very alakazamy tonight.
Bing: Well, then everything should ?be ?very ?hopping on the gate.
Peggy: Ha, ha.
Bing: Miss Lee, Orange-colored Sky.

3. Cowboy Thief Sketch
The scene for this episode's sketch is set up in a frontier town known as The Thing, Nevada, where Peggy Lee runs a hotel.
Bing: Good morning, ma'am.
Peggy: Good morning, stranger. Welcome to the Gopher Hole Hotel.
Bing: My name is Ace Crosby, ma'am. You have vacant rooms here at the Gopher Hole?
Peggy: Yes, sir, and believe me, it's a pleasure to have an Ace in the Hole.
[Audience laughter.]
Bing: Man, this must be a tough turf. What's 'em arrows in the wall? Indians been here?
Peggy: No, they point the way to the bathroom.
Bing: Ooh! What do ?you ?think ?of ?me?
Peggy: Bathroom!
[Audience laughter.]
Peggy: Here's your key, Ace. Room 21 on the second floor."
Bing: Alright. Will you send the bellboy up for my laundry?
Peggy: Sorry, we don't have a bellboy. Should I come up?
Bing: Okay, but bring some ?wide ?robe with you, hmm?
[Audience laughter.]
Peggy: You know, Ace?
Bing: What?
Peggy: You are different from most of the fine, upright, bashful honorable men in this town. You are a heel!
[Audience laughter.]
Bing: Well, you are mighty attractive yourself, girl.
Hopalong: Good morning, Miss Peggy.
Peggy: Good morning, Hopalong.
Hopalong immediately recognizes Ace as Itchy Fingers Crosby, a famous Nevada thief. A verbal confrontation ensues.
The next scene takes place in the town's bank, where Itchy Fingers has sneaked in, and succeeded at opening the safe. It turns out that Hopalong and Peggy had been hiding near the safe, waiting to catch Ace in flagrante delicto. But the most surprised parties end up being Hopalong and Peggy, when Itchy reveals himself to actually be not Itchy, and not Ace either, but Buckskin Crosby, a famous US marshall.
Bing: You know, Miss Peggy, ever since I met you this morning I had a hanker.
[Peggy makes an odd, whimpering sound.]
Bing: I just had it down a-hankering for you. Jolly, I'd like to do something about it.
Peggy: Okay, Marshall, what's your plan?
[Audience laughter.]
Bing: Well, it's kind of personal, between you and me. I thought that maybe we might get hitched. I don't like to propose in front of Hoppy.
Hopalong: Okay, I'll move along. Best of luck to you, Bucky and Miss Peggy.
Bing & Peggy [in unison]: Thanks, Hoppy.

4. Preamble And Postlude To "Silver Bells"
Bing: ... And we get on to one of this year's big Christmas tunes, written by Livingston and Evans. Peggy, how about you taking a piece of this? Do you know the song?
Peggy (still using the voice of her character in the sketch): Sure, Marshall, what's your plan?
[Audience laughter.]
Bing: Oh now! You're stuck on a gag and you won't turn ?a ?bit. Gag beater, we'll call you. Well, if you'll take a little and I'll take a little, Mr. Hope will be very happy, because this is from his forthcoming picture The Lemon Drop Kid.
After the performance is over, the banter between Crosby and Lee continues.
Bing: Thank you, Peggy. Peggy, believe me, the fact that we sang Silver Bells will make Hope really happy.
Peggy: Oh, Bob is happy all the time.
Bing: Well, slap-happy, anyway.
Peggy: Ha, ha, ha. How's Bob doing as a Chesterfield salesman, ah?
Bing: Pretty good, pretty good. Of course, it doesn't take much of a salesman to sell Chesterfield.
Peggy: No, that's right. They sell themselves once folks make that Chesterfield mildness taste.
Peggy's words serve as the cue for the sponsor's commercial, delivered by Carpenter and Crosby.

5. Closing Banter
At the end of the show, Lee asks Crosby who will guest on the next episode -- a routinary question, though one that Lee had not been assigned to make in a long time. Crosby reveals that his children will be guesting, and he jokes about them. Lee also asks Crosby whether the upcoming episode will include reprises of the tunes that he recorded with his offspring.

Bing Crosby closes the show by asking Hopalong Cassidy and Peggy Lee to cross the street with him and hop across to Bob Hope's derby dam to have a sarsaparilla -- although in Crosby's case, it won't be a sarsaparilla. Instead, it will be a "gun-powdered float." (These party allusions refer back to the episode's sketch.)


Date: February 21, 1951 (Broadcast Date) (Pre-taped 2/10)
Location: CBS Playhouse, 1615 North Vine, Hollywood, California
Label: The Bing Crosby Show For Chesterfield (2nd Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee (v), Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires {Conlon, Mack McLean, Loulie "Lily" Jean Norman, Charles Parlato, Gloria Wood} (bkv)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) Just The Way You Are - 2:15(Ralph Freed)
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) Would I Love You (Love You, Love You) - 2:13(Bob Russell, Harold Spina)
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 549 — I've Got A Crush On You   (1995)
Avid Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Avc 876 — Peggy Lee ("The Essential Collection" Series)    (2007)
Both titles on:
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscShow 56 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby Show   (1951)
Sunflower Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Sun 2110 — Just the Way You Are {Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee}   (2005)
Flankenzudeutch Istanbul Collectors' Label LP(Germany) Mdtb 05 — [Bing Crosby] Bing's Beaus   
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 20 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   





Photos

Three pages from the script of this episode, including the frontal one (middle image). Note the penciled timings -- !:12 for the intro, 29:10 as the closure. Old-Time radio programing was minutely regulated. Timing stipulations were strict. As would also become the case for standard television, a network episode could not go past its scheduled slot.


Schedule

The episode's date of recording (Saturday, February 10) is given by both of my main Crosby sources (chronicler Malcolm Macfarlane, radio authority Lionel Pairpoint). No rehearsal date is given by either expert. Macfarlane adds the name of the recording building and the starting time for the recording activity (5:45 p.m.).


Personnel

1. Guest
According to Ken Carpenter, this episode's guest is "the glamorous, unpredictable Tallulah Bankhead." On the air, Peggy Lee is not billed at all -- neither as a guest nor as a member of the cast. (See however, photocopies of the script, above.) Also absent from the closing is Crosby's customary thank you or acknowledgment of Lee's presence. Moreover, it is the pair of Crosby and Bankhead that close the show -- not a "bye" nor a peep heard from Lee. This "lack of presence" is one of various details which have led me to the impression that Peggy Lee's vocal was taped separately from the other portions of the show, which are infused with Bankhead's involvement. Actually, Lee does speak once during the episode, in a direct reply to a Bankhead line, but I'm inclined to believe that the singer's reply was also taped separately, and edited into the episode. (Alternatively, Peggy Lee could have been present, but would have remained mostly silent simply because the script concentrated on the female guest star, leaving the semi-regular female singer without lines. But if such was the case, the omission of a mere acknowledgment at the end of the show would be even more odd than it already is.)


Songs

1. Omitted Numbers
Containing the full scheduled routine, the first page of the episode's script (photocopied below) suggests that Crosby was originally slated to do "You're Just In Love" as his opening number. However, "You're Just In Love" was ultimately scrapped. The motivation for the deletion seems to have been the addition of a long (8:40) bantering segment, featuring Bankhead, Crosby, and Carpenter. Lee's and Crosby's duet, originally scheduled to be broadcast halfway through the episode, was moved to this spot, too. (It was heard right after the banter.)

2. Solos And Duets
"Would I Love You (Love You, Love You)" is a Peggy Lee solo. "Just The Way You Are" is her duet with Crosby.


Patter

1. Banter Between The Show's Host And The Episode's Guest Star
The following excerpt from the episode's banter makes mention of Peggy Lee.
Tallulah: Well, darling, enough of The Big Show, Bing. What do you do here, on this itsy bitsy thing?
Bing: Well, we sing some songs, sell some Chesterfield. That's about it.
Tallulah: But don't you have any glamor, darling? I mean, don't you have a girl singer?
Bing: Frequently, certainly. Tonight we have a very special girl singer.
Tallulah: Oh, isn't he divine? Is he a dream!
Bing: Yeah, tonight Peggy Lee is gonna sing for us.
[Moment of silence.]
Tallulah: Peggy Lee?? Well, unless she happens to be related to Robert E. Lee, I am sure I DETEST her!!!
Bing: Threw a rebel yell here, didn't it?
Tallulah: You bet! I sing, you know.
Bing: You do?
[Bankhead sings a couple of lines from "Give My Regards To Broadway."]
Bing: Oh, thank you, Marlena Dietrich.
Tallulah: Well, really, Bing, it seems be rather crassly booking to have me and Miss Lee on the same program.
Bing: Really?
Tallulah: Well, after all, I am a girl. I am a singer.
[Silence.]
Tallulah: Well??
Bing: Now, that's two strikes; you have one more.
Tallulah: You crumb.
Bing: Oh, boy. That's the only girl I know that can tie two ?strings in a knot.
Tallulah: Not bad, isn't ?it?
Bing: Tallulah, you know very well I kid, I do, to say the least. And when I refer to your singing in a derogatory manner, I certainly don't mean it.
Tallulah: Well, I should hope not. Ha, ha, ha!
Bing: Of course, I don't. Tell you what, I've got a song here that I'm supposed to do right now. I'll just go and sit down; you can sing my song.
Tallulah: Oh, no, no, no, Bing. You are sweet and gracious and divine, darling, but, eh, now that you've asked me, I -- I -- I really don't think I like singing.
Bing: Oh, Tallulah ...
Tallulah: No, no no, no use begging; it's useless, it's useless.
Bing: I'm sorry.
Tallulah: I just won't sing now!! ... Oh, a little later, perhaps.
Bing: That's it, a little later, ha.

2. Preamble To "Just The Way You Are"
Bing: Now if you'll excuse me for a few minutes, Peggy Lee and I'd like to blend a popular favorite to sing, called Just The Way You Are. Are you ready, Peg?
[No response from Lee is heard. After the performance is finished, and as plenty of applause is heard, Ken Carpenter exclaims, "very nice, Bing and Peggy!" Crosby gives a response along the lines of "very nice for you to say so." Once again, there is no response from Lee.]

3. Preamble And Postscript To "Would I Love You"
Tallulah: And now here, is Miss Peggy Lee, who brings us a new ballad entitled Would I Love You.
[This very well sung number receives loud whistling and enthusiastic audience applause.]
Tallulah: Oh, darling, that was lovely, Peggy, really, really beautiful.
Peggy: Oh, thank you, Tallulah. And I consider that a real compliment, coming from another girl singer.
Tallulah: Isn't she sweet. Uh, where's the man called Bing?
Bing: Right here, right here.
Tallulah: Darling, I hope you heard what Peggy said.
Bing: I did.
Tallulah: Well, don't you think I should sing?
Bing: Certainly. You know, Tallulah, what we should do is, we gotta do a play with a song in it.
Tallulah: Better yet.
The banter between Crosby and Bankhead continues along these lines, evolving into a dramatic musical sketch. Peggy Lee does not participate any further.


Date: June 18, 1952 (Broadcast Date) (Pre-taped 6/02)
Location: CBS Playhouse, 1615 North Vine, Hollywood, California
Label: The Bing Crosby Show For Chesterfield (3rd Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee (v), Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires {Conlon, Mack McLean, Loulie "Lily" Jean Norman, Charles Parlato, Gloria Wood} (bkv)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) Lover - 3:12(Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) / arr: Gordon Jenkins
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscShow 112 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby Show   (1952)
Demand Performance Collectors' Label cassetteDpc 707 — The Unforgettable Peggy Lee   (1985)
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 549 — I've Got A Crush On You   (1995)
Cloud 9 Productions Public Domain CD(France) Imp 2003785 — Peggy Lee ("Giants Of Jazz" Series)   (2003)
Avid Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Avc 876 — Peggy Lee ("The Essential Collection" Series)    (2007)
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) Watermelon Weather - 2:08(Paul Francis Webster, Hoagy Carmichael)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscShow 112 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby Show   (1952)
Red Line Public Domain CD(Italy) Cd 4527 2 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby And Friends ("The Timeless Collection" Series)    (2004)
Nimbus Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Rts 4184 — [Bing Crosby] Gone Fishin'; Bing Crosby & Buddies, 193-1960 ("Retrospective" Series)   (2011)
c. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) [Musical Commercial] Sound Off For Chesterfield - 0:20(unknown)
All titles on:
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 32 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   






Photos

The Smokin' Hot Piper Series, continued. Part XXVIII. Christmas gifts could burn to ashes and Frosty the Snowman could dissolve into a pool of muddy water, but a pipe's command to be worshipped had to be obeyed on all occasions, and in defiance oof any rival deities. One deity of whom Bing's Pipe would approve (and vice versa) is standing tall and mighty next to the crooner in the third of these photos: it is the revered, legendary radio pioneer Al Jarvis.


Schedule

The episode's date of recording (Monday, June 2) is given by both of my main Crosby sources (chronicler Malcolm Macfarlane, radio authority Lionel Pairpoint). No rehearsal date is given by either expert.


Personnel

1. Guests
Peggy Lee and Joe Venuti are billed as this episode's guests. At the end of the show, Peggy Lee is announced as the guest for the next episode, too.

2. Solos And Duets
"Lover" is a Peggy Lee solo, "Watermelon Weather" her duet with Bing Crosby. The above-listed Chesterfield jingle is also sung by the two artists, whose voices are backed by The Rhythmaires.


Songs

1. "Lover"
For Peggy Lee's performance of this particular song, an echo chamber was apparently used. I assume that the intention was to produce a haunting but still vivid sound. To my ears, the results fell off the mark; the performance sounds muffled and remote.

2. "Sound Off For Chesterfield"
I have given the title "Sound Off For Chesterfield" to this episode's commercial. That title is entirely my own invention (though based on my listening of the lyrics, of course). The sources at hand show no particular title for it, other than "Chesterfield Jingle." (Incidentally, the words "sound off for Chesterfield" can be heard in just about all the musical commercials from this period, on the very first line. Basically, it is the same jingle in all instances, though with partially different lyrics.)


Patter

1. Introduction Of Peggy Lee, Banter And Preamble To "Lover"
Bing: Now, ladies and gentlemen, I'd like to present a charming young lady, a very dear friend of mine, a fine vocalist. I'm not sure if she isn't the finest, eh, young lady vocalist we have in this business. She's the star of her own show for Oldsmobile over CBS. We call her the sophisticate from North Dakota, Miss Peggy Lee.
[Audience applause.]
Peggy: Thank you, Bing, but I'm not really a sophisticate.
Bing: You are not?
Peggy: I'm just a farm girl.
Bing: Well, for a girl who rolled in a lot of hay, you sure have a fancy dress on.
Peggy: Ha.
Bing: And that hat is a n__ number, too. What I meant, Peggy, was that you sing rather soulful, sophisticated songs -- with a great deal of feeling, I might add.
Peggy: Thank you, Bing. Did you hear my new Decca record, Lover?
Bing: Yes, and believe me, I never heard no one sing like that around a butter churn.
Peggy: Ha. Well, Bing, when you sing nowadays, you're supposed to really live it!
Bing: Really?
Peggy: Let the world know what your problem is.
Bing: I got no problems. Everything's fine.
Peggy: You should -- you should see a psychiatrist.
Bing: I'm not ready to lie down yet.
Peggy: Well, what I'm getting at is...
Bing: What do you mean? I don't dig it.
Peggy: Well, I mean, when you're singing a modern song you should get up sad ...
Bing: I should?
Peggy: ... become ?violent and tear yourself to shreds while you are singing.
Bing: Lady, I have enough trouble remembering the words. I can't throw a breakdown there, too.
Peggy: Oh, well, who cares about the words? The public doesn't want words. It wants wild, weird sounds.
Bing: I must do my next recording in a slaughter house, I guess. ____.
Peggy: Ha, ha. Ooh, that would be divine.
Bing: Bovine, too, hmm? Peg, I refuse to work myself into a frenzy. I'm just not gonna blow this wig flippers and top blowers. I refuse.
Peggy: I know. I read in Quick magazine a couple of weeks ago that you and Perry Como still toss off a song with supreme nonchalance.
Bing: Supreme nonchalance? Is that what we do?
Peggy: Yes! The lyrics you sing may tell of heartbreak but you and Perry have your minds on other things while you sing.
Bing: That's right. I have my mind on Perry and he's got his mind on me.
Ken: Yeah, indeed! How true.
Peggy: Well, anyhow, the article in Quick pointed out that you and Como are in complete contrast to the new soul-struck school of singers who are suckers with loud and extravagant laments for lost and unobtainable sweethearts.
Bing: Well, Peggy, if a girl's tied the can on you and given you the ?gater-blown town, what's the use of hollering about it?
Peggy: Well, maybe if you holler loud enough she'll come back.
Bing: It's only a sound; who needs her?
Peggy: You mean, then, you don't care to suffer.
Bing: Why should I suffer? I like to sing!
Peggy: Well, I like to sing, too!
Bing: Oh, what's your selection tonight, Peg?
Peggy: Well, I just thought I might do Lover.
Bing: Oh, this has a good deal of a new sound in it. I hope Como's listening; it may wake him up a little. Go ahead, Peggy!

2. Preamble To "Watermelon Weather"
Bing: Peg, how about that duet we were gonna do on the song that we recorded recently for Decca? Number, aye, 567812; "Watermelon Weather." Do you remember that?
Peggy: Yeah, okay, Bing.
Bing: Don't look for any new sound in this selection.
Peggy: Ha, ha, ha!
Bing: It's a nice, old-fashioned, easygoing tune written by Hoagy Carmichael, who is a nice old-fashioned easygoing boy from Indiana. Logansport, I think. Paul Webster wrote the lyrics, and very fine they are ... Mr. Trotter, let's head for the watermelon patch and plug this tune, huh?

3. Chesterfield Promotional Spot
Bing: You know, you get out of a cigarette just as much as the manufacturer puts into it. You get out of Chesterfield a smoke that is milder, with extraordinary good taste and no unpleasant aftertaste. That's because down in Richmond, in Durham, they put into Chesterfield only the ingredients that gives you the best possible smoke.
Peggy: Say, Bing, I can vouch for that. I've just been to Durham. And I've seen the Chesterfield factories first hand. Seen how they take the best tobacco and pure moistening agents and that moist and pure white cigarette paper. It's easy to see that Chesterfield uses only the ingredients that give you the best possible smoke.
Bing: Research ?back ?setup, Peg. And Chesterfield Research Laboratories are the newest and the best in the business.
Ken: And Chesterfield are made in the newest and most modern cigarette factories. Right, Peg?
Peggy: Right you are, Ken. Right, new and clean.
Bing: There you have it, folks. The best ingredients backed up. That's why you should change to Chesterfield, by the best manufacture and the best research. That's what is in a Chesterfield for you. That's why you should change to Chesterfield today.
Peggy: Bing, as a Chesterfield smoker myself, I back that up one hundred percent.
Bing: Well, come on, Peg, let's give the folks some good advice with a little musical backing, hmm?
A brief Chesterfield Jingle is then sung by Crosby, Lee, and The Rhythmaires. The jingle's first line, sung by Crosby, mentions Peggy Lee by name. ("Follow the lead of Peggy Lee / Smoke the one ...")


Date: June 25, 1952 (Broadcast Date) (Pre-taped 6/15)
Location: CBS Playhouse, 1615 North Vine, Hollywood, California
Label: The Bing Crosby Show For Chesterfield (3rd Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Edwin "Buddy" Cole (p), Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee (v), Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires {Conlon, Mack McLean, Loulie "Lily" Jean Norman, Charles Parlato, Gloria Wood} (bkv)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) You Go To My Head - 3:24(John Fred Coots, Haven Gillespie)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscShow 113 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby Show   (1952)
Demand Performance Collectors' Label cassetteDpc 707 — The Unforgettable Peggy Lee   (1985)
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 549 — I've Got A Crush On You   (1995)
Avid Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Avc 876 — Peggy Lee ("The Essential Collection" Series)    (2007)
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) Zing A Little Zong - 2:40(Leo Robin, Harry Warren)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscShow 113 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby Show   (1952)
c. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) [Musical Commercial] Chesterfield Summer Vacation - 0:45(unknown)
d. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) The Moon Came Up With A Great Idea Last Night - 2:36(Johnny Burke, Jimmy Van Heusen)
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscShow 113 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby Show   (1952)
All-Star Products Collectors' Label (Austr) LPAsp Lp 2000 — [Bing Crosby] Bing Crosby’s All Star Chesterfield Show   
All titles on:
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 173 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   








Photos

Come summertime, Croonerboy Crosby shapeshifted into a leather-bound macho who whiled away his hours in a feral daze of fowl hunting, lumber logging, fly fishing, and horse riding ... Or so was my mind led to imagine, as I gathered this portfolio of manliness manifest. Joking aside, Harris Lillis Crosby clearly enjoyed the outdoors life of the countryside. He counted among his home properties a ranch in Elko, Nevada. (On that ranch is where we are seeing him in some of these photos, all fenced in.) He owned horses as well, and was, in particular, an avid fisherman. What's more, cowboy Crosby became a regular fixture in the ABC TV series The American Sportsman, which focused on following celebrities as they went out fishing, hunting, or on any other recreational expeditions. Indeed, our crooner is caught gone fishin', or with his catch of the day in many an extant picture. (For the more exacting and seriously minded viewer, I should point out that not all of the sporting events in these photos are from Crosby's everyday life. A couple of them are instead staged shots from the artist's world of film.)


Schedule

The episode's date of recording (Sunday, June 15) is given by both of my main Crosby sources (chronicler Malcolm Macfarlane, radio authority Lionel Pairpoint). No rehearsal date is given by either expert. The June 25 episode closes both the season and the partnership between Crosby and Chesterfield.


Personnel

1. Guest
Peggy Lee is the only guest for this episode, which happens to be the very last one of the entire Chesterfield series.

2. Buddy Cole
Aften singing one of his solos, Bing Crosby acknowledges the backing that he has received from Buddy Coles piano. After another solo, Crosby acknowledges the pianist for a second time. Cole is thus presumed to also be the pianist in the Lee selections.

3. Peggy Lee Solos And Duets
"You Go To My Head" is Peggy Lee's solo for this episode. The other numbers are Lee-Crosby duets.


Songs

1. "The Moon Came Up With A Great Idea"
Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee taped their duet "The Moon Came Up With A Great Idea" twice, once for a commercial recording at Decca (May 16, 1952) and once for this episode (June 15, 1952). Though taped just a month apart and overall very similar, this version differs from the Decca recording in various notable aspects. For starters, it has additional lyrics. Halfway through the song, a spoken exchange between Peggy Lee and Bing Crosby is heard, but the exchanged words are not the exact same ones in both versions. There is also a different instrumental solo in each version (possibly a trumpet in both cases, or it might be a cornet in one case and a trumpet in the other case).

2. "Chesterfield Summer Vacation"
I have given the title "Chesterfield Summer Vacation" to this episode's commercial. That title is entirely my own invention (though based on my listening of the lyrics, of course). The sources at hand show no particular title for it, other than the generic appellation "Chesterfield Jingle."







Patter

1. Introduction Of Peggy Lee, Banter, And Preamble To "You Go To My Head"
Bing: And now folks, here's a very charming, very talented songstress, one of our really great vocalists who's currently appearing at Ciro's here on the Sunset Strip. Miss Peggy Lee.
[Audience applause.]
Peggy: Thank you, Bing.
Bing: Ah, Peggy, it's nice to have you aboard in your iridescent midnight blue.
Peggy: Oh, thank you.
Bing: That's what that is, isn't it?
Peggy: Yes, it is.
Bing: See, I'm not color blind. Now, come on.
Peggy: Noo.
Bing: Nice to have you aboard anyhow, Peg.
Peggy: All set for your vacation, Bing?
Bing: Yep, tomorrow morning I'm slipping into my Levi's and my West Tex boots and I'm heading for the ranch. I'm going trout fishing on horseback.
Peggy: On horseback?
Bing: Yeah. Going to. In Nevada the trout is so wild we have to lasso 'em.
Peggy: Ha, ha. Is trout your favorite fish?
Bing: Well, they are very good, of course. Lately I like pike.
Peggy: Who?
Bing: Pike!
Peggy: Oh. What about Ike?
[n.b.: This is a reference to then-presidential candidate Dwight "Ike" Eisenhower]
Bing: Well, I imagine Ike likes pike, too. [Lee and the audience laugh.] He loves the pitch, I know that.
Peggy: Well, I don't suppose he has much time for fishing right now.
Bing: Only for delegates, I think. Be that as it may, Peggy, what's your selection gonna be tonight?
Peggy: Well, I thought I'd sing You Go To My Head.
Bing (singing a few words): Oh, you go to my head and you linger like a glass of champagne [sic]. Oh, it's my favorite ballad ______.

2. Postscript To "You Go To My Head" And Preamble To "Zing A Little Zong"
Bing: Ooh. So nice. So lovely. Now, would you like to fight it out with me in a duet?
Peggy: Ookay.
Bing: This is a thing called Zing A Little Zong. It's from the forthcoming Paramount picture Just For You.
Peggy: Oh, Just For You is your new picture, isn't it, Bing?
Bing: What do you think?
Peggy: Ha, ha.
Bing: Wait till I get my copy.
Peggy: All ready?

3. Chesterfield Promotional Spot
Ken: Chesterfields are made in the newest and most modern cigarette factories. And Peggy Lee can back me up on that.
Peggy: Right, Ken. I watched 'em being made in Durham. Nothing but the best.
Bing: Folks, the word 'best' sums up the whole Chesterfield story. Best ingredients, best manufacture, best research. That's what is in every pack of Chesterfields for you. That's why you should change to Chesterfield today. Peggy, let's sing a summary sort of a jingle here, huh? All about vacation ___.
Bing, Peggy, and the Rhythmaires then proceed to sing the jingle, whose lyrics are longer (about two choruses) and arguably better than those heard in the instances of the Chesterfiled jingle from the previously listed episodes.

4. Preamble To "The Moon Came Up With A Great Idea"
Bing: Johnny Burke and Jimmy Van Heusen have written a new tune which Peggy and I recently recorded for Decca, entitled The Moon Came Up With A Great Idea. I think they came up with a good title there, too. I think we ought to sing it, don't you, Peg?
Peggy: Oh, that's a great idea.
Bing: Thinking, I'm thinking all the time. Let's go, my dear.
Peggy: Yeah -- ha.




The Bing Crosby Show For General Electric

Since it was also on CBS, The Bing Crosby Show For General Electric could be considered a mere continuation of The Bing Crosby Show For Chesterfield, though with a new sponsor. Unlike Crosby's previous Chesterfield and Philco programming, however, this General Electric series lasted two instead of three seasons. It would also be the Old Groaner's last fully sponsored radio series. At issue was the dramatic erosion in audience and popularity that the radio airwaves had been suffering since television had begun to take hold over the nation in the late 1940s. The first season, broadcast Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m. West, 9:30 p.m. East, (basically the same slot as Crosby's previous shows), opened on October 9, 1952 and closed on July 2, 1953. The second season (moved to Sundays, if the rather vague data at my reach is accurate) started on September 27, 1953 and concluded on May 30, 1954.

Old reliables Ken Carpenter and John Scott Trotter remained regular cast members throughout the series. Coming in as semi-regulars during the General Electric cycle were pianist Buddy Cole (24 episodes), Crosby's sons Gary and Lindsay (11 episodes), and singer Rosemary Clooney (19 episodes). In a pattern similar to Peggy Lee's, Clooney had made her debut appearance in one of the last episodes of Crosby's previous series (The Bing Crosby Show For Chesterfield) and had then proceeded to make repeat appearances in the early episodes of The Bing Crosby Show For General Electric. (In Peggy Lee's case, she made her debut appearance in one of the last episodes of Kraft Music Hall, and then proceeded to make repeat appearances in early episodes of his subsequent series, Philco Radio Time.)

During this General Electric period, Peggy Lee made the same number of visits as Frank Sinatra, Jimmy Stewart, Dinah Shore and Helen O'Connell: three. Her earliest appearance took place during the first season. Lee's two other appearances were made during the show's last season, and both had an air of sweet nostalgia; each episode included numbers that Lee had sung when she was a semi-regular in Crosby radio programming.





Photos & Venue

Top: ad material promoting Crosby's ties to CBS and the General Electric series.

Right above: the primary venue for the taping of CBS' Bing Crosby Show For General Electric is presumed to have been the same one used for his preceding CBS series: the CBS Radio Playhouse. Another venue on which he taped more than a handful of General Electric and Chesterfield shows was the Plaza Theatre, located in Palm Springs -- not too far from one of his beloved golf courses). The theatre is seen in all three images above, as it looked in a post card drawing (third image) and in photos from 1947 and 1951. A 1951 Chesterfield episode (taped March 31; broadcast April 4) is the earliest known entry in the crooner's batch of Plaza Theatre tapings. Peggy Lee was not part of that 1951 installment, but she is heard on a later Plaza Theatre (February 26, 1953), to be discussed below.


Date: February 26, 1953 (Broadcast Date) (Pre-taped 2/07)
Location: Plaza Theatre, 28 South Palm Canyon Drive, Palm Springs, California
Label: The Bing Crosby Show For General Electric (1st Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee (v), Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires {Conlon, Mack McLean, Loulie "Lily" Jean Norman, Charles Parlato, Gloria Wood} (bkv)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) Just One Of Those Things - 2:40(Cole Porter) / arr: Gordon Jenkins
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 549 — I've Got A Crush On You   (1995)
Avid Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Avc 876 — Peggy Lee ("The Essential Collection" Series)    (2007)
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) That's A-Plenty - 2:22(Ray Gilbert, Lew Pollack) / arr: John Scott Trotter
Both titles on:
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscShow 21 — [Bing Crosby] General Electric Bing Crosby Show   (1953)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 161 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   





Photos

The Smokin' Hot Piper Series, continued. Part XXIX.


Schedule

The episode's date of recording (Saturday, February 7) and location city (Palm Springs) are given by both of my main Crosby sources (chronicler Malcolm Macfarlane, radio authority Lionel Pairpoint). Macfarlane adds that the March 5 episode (not featuring Lee) was also recorded on the same date. No rehearsal details are offered by either expert.

Personnel

1. Guests
Ken Carpenter announces the episode's guests as "Miss Peggy Lee and Mister Joe Venuti."

2. Peggy Lee Solos And Duets
"Just One Of Those Things" is Peggy Lee's solo for this episode. "That's A-Plenty"is her duet with Bing Crosby.

3. Dixieland Band
An old rag tune that dixieland had fully embraced long before the taping of this episode, "That's A-Plenty" is played in a hot Dixie style. Unfortunately, the musicians are not identified. They might just be members of the John Scott Trotter Orchestra. Red Nichols and Joe Venuti are very likely to have been among the players.


Patter

1. Introduction Of Peggy Lee And Banter Between Crosby And Lee
Bing: And now, folks, our featured guest this evening. A delightful young lady loaded with talent, charm, ability and a beautiful beat, too, currently co-starring with Danny Thomas in the motion picture The Jazz Singer, Miss Peggy Lee.
[Audience applause.]
Bing: Peggy!
Peggy: Hi, Bing.
Bing: Having a good time here at the Springs, Peg?
Peggy: Oh, yes, but gee, it's grown some.
Bing: Ain't it?
Peggy: Yes, the new El Mirador Hotel, the golf courses, the nightclubs ...
Bing: Oh, yeah. It's a far cry from the little Indian village that once was here, I'll tell you that.
Peggy: Well, how did Palm Springs start anyway, Bing?
Bing: Well, Peg, many years ago it was just a little sleepy Indian village, like I said.
Peggy: Hmm.
Bing: Really, it got its start when one day a cover wagon rode through here and a little baby boy bounced out. And this little baby boy was picked up and was adopted by the Indians.
Peggy: And, uh, did the Indians give this little boy a name?
Bing: Yes, they named him Charlie Farrell.
[Audience laughter and applause.]
Bing: Now, look out.
Peggy: Charlie Farrell!?
Bing: Uh-huh.
Peggy: Is that an Indian name?
Bing: Yes, in Indian that means bouncer of tennis balls.
Peggy: Ha, ha. And now, is he big mayor, huh?
Bing: How.
Peggy: Well, I guess that he was elected!
[Audience laughter.]
Bing: Oh, I guess so!

2. Preamble And Postscript To "Just One Of Those Things"
Bing: Hey, you gotta a song for us, honey?
Peggy: Yes, I thought I'd do Just One Of Those Things.
Bing: Oh, I'd like that. Work it out with Mr. Trotter, will you? I'll go out there, sit down, and listen.
Peggy: Alright.
After Peggy finishes singing, Bing returns to the mike.
Bing: Wonderful, Peggy. That's, uh, quite an arrangement. Who made that arrangement?
Peggy: Gordon Jenkins.
Bing: Well, that really comes on. A smasher. Very good, indeed.
Peggy: Thank you, Bing.

3. Preamble To "That's A-Plenty"
Bing: Say, what do you say, you and I take a shot at something together, uh?
Peggy: Well, uh, what did you have in mind, Bing?
Bing: Well, you know, there's a song going around -- it's an old jazzband song that Fudd Livingston wrote, That's A-Plenty, and I think it's got some lyrics to it, no, John? John Trotter has a wonderful dixieland arrangement. I'm willing to try it. If I blow a gasket or something I'll go to pits and you and the band take over.
Peggy: Well, let's say, if we blow a gasket -- ha, ha.
Bing: No, you'll be in there.


Songs And Songwriters

1. "That's A-Plenty"
2. Fud Livingston
During the above-quoted banter, Bing Crosby refers to Fud Livingston as the songwriter of That's A-Plenty. Elsewhere, however, the music of this 1914 publication is credited to Lew Pollack and the lyrics (written decades later) to Ray Gilbert.

Fud Livingston (1906-1957) was a composer, arranger, and multi-instrumentalist whose main claim to fame is his composition of the jazz standard "I'm Through With Love." The fact that Livingston worked as a publicist during the last decades of his life could have led to a misunderstanding on Bing Crosby's part. Alternatively, Crosby might have been privy to facts (or claims) that have now been lost in the mist of time. Perhaps, Fud Livingston claimed that he was the true author of the song. (Crosby and Livingston are likely to have known each other reasonably well. In the past, both men had moved in the same circles: they had worked with The Paul Whiteman Orchestra and also with an ensemble led by Red Nichols.)


Date: November 15, 1953 (Broadcast Date) (Pre-taped 11/08)
Location: Hollywood, California
Label: The Bing Crosby Show For General Electric (2nd Season)
The Bing Crosby Show For General Electric

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) I've Got A Crush On You - 2:48(Ira Gershwin, George Gershwin)
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 549 — I've Got A Crush On You   (1995)
Avid Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Avc 876 — Peggy Lee ("The Essential Collection" Series)    (2007)
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) 'S Wonderful - 1:38(George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin)
c. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) Collegiate: College Medley - 0:41(Nathan J. Bonx, Moe Jaffe)
d. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) Ain't We Got Fun: College Medley - 0:58(Raymond Egan, Gus Kahn, Richard Whiting)
e. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) Betty Co-Ed: College Medley - 0:39(J. Paul Fogarty, Rudy Vallée)
f. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) The Varsity Drag: College Medley - 0:51(Lew Brown, Buddy G. DeSylva, Ray Henderson)
All titles on:
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscShow 47 — [Bing Crosby] General Electric Bing Crosby Show   (1953)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 167 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   






Photos

The Smokin' Hot Piper Series, continued. Part XXX. The front cover belongs to the November 1973 issue of Field & Stream magazine.


Schedule

The episode's date of recording (Sunday, November 8) is given by both of my main Crosby sources (chronicler Malcolm Macfarlane, radio authority Lionel Pairpoint). Neither expert offers data about rehearsals. Macfarlane adds that the November 29 episode of the show was also recorded on this date.


Personnel

1. Guest
"Miss Peggy Lee" is this episode's sole guest.

2. Solos And Duets
This episode's rendition of " 'S Wonderful" is a Crosby-Lee duet that they had performed in a much earlier installment (February 11, 1948). Lee's solo, "I've Got A Crush On You," had been performed twice before (February 11, 1948; October 12, 1949), on both occasions in the company of Bing Crosby. The remaining numbers are duets as well, all of them part of a medley.


Patter

1. Introduction Of Peggy Lee And Preamble To "I've Got A Crush On You"
Bing: Now, folks, our guest this evening is one of the very top chantooses. Whether it's record, radio, TV or movies, she's always a delight. The lovely Miss Peggy Lee.
Peggy: Hi, Bing. Thanks for them kind words.
Bing: Oh, I always have plenty such for you, Peg. Like, it's a pleasure to have you with us again -- something like that.
Peggy: It's a pleasure to be here.
Bing: What are you gonna do?
Peggy: Well, if the orchestra will hit ?right, I'm going into my dance!
[n.b.: This is a reference to the earlier patter between Bing Crosby and Ken Carpenter, during which the two men joked about certain listeners. Aware of Crosby's upcoming TV show debut, such listenrs were eagerly claiming to have dancing and singing skills that would make them suitable to appear on the televised special.]
Bing: Ha, you were listening to Ken and me, ah?
Peggy: I sure was.
Bing: Oh, a big deal like that would just be wasted on the radio, Peg. Why don't you sing something?
Peggy: Alright. How about I've Got A Crush On You?
Bing: Oh, look no further; safe choice, believe me."


2. Postscript To "I've Got A Crush On You" And Preamble To " 'S Wonderful"
Bing: Oh, that was lovely, Peggy. Really, highly listenable. Now that you've captivated our audience with this excellent George Gershwin tune, it seems silly to break the mood. Let's you and I continue with another Gershwin ballad, 'S Wonderful.
Peggy: Glad to.

3. Preamble To The College Medley
Bing: Oh, Peggy!
Peggy: Yes, Bing.
Bing: Peggy, did you take notice of the homecoming celebration at the University of Southern California last week? Did you see that?
Peggy: Oh, sure. The kids at SC had a big flapper day parade.
Bing: That's right. They really carried on, didn't they?
Peggy: It was a jolly reminder of how the collegiates carried on back in the twitching twenties.
Bing: Ho, ho. Twenties is right. Well, you people who twitched then aren't twitching now, I'll tell you that. But I guess young folks will never again laugh things off, or reach such a degree of utter abandonment as they did in those days, ah?
Peggy: They were thrilling carefree times, I guess.
Bing: I guess, too.
Peggy: But, uh, you can guess closer than I.
Bing: But anyhow, Peg, let's -- let's you be Betty Co-ed and I'll be Joe College. And we'll hit some of the happy tunes which ___ the what-the-__-heck attitude of the twenties.
Peggy: Okay. Chick, your shiva is ready.
Bing: Our first number is Collegiates, folks. This -- this is the bees' knees.

4. Preamble To "Ain't We Got Fun"
Peggy: Ha, ha, ha.
Bing: Rowdydow.
Peggy: That was the cat's pajamas, Harry.
Bing: ??I'd hate to mention the ??snake's hips. Now here's a song that recommended a philosophy popular in the very early twenties, Ain't We Got Fun.

5. Preamble To "Betty Co-Ed"
Bing: Yes, sir, right at the end of the twenties, I think it was 1930, J. Paul Fogarty and Rudy Vallée took pen in hand and had this to say about college girls.

6. Preamble To "Varsity Drag"
Bing: Of course, now, the Charleston was the big rage as far as dancing went during most of the twenties. But there were other dances, too. Here's one that was featured in the Broadway musical Good News. This was called Varsity Drag. This was a gasser.


Date: November 29, 1953 (Broadcast Date) (Pre-taped 11/08)
Label: The Bing Crosby Show For General Electric (2nd Season)

John Scott Trotter And His Orchestra (acc), Edwin "Buddy" Cole (p), Bing Crosby, Peggy Lee (v)

a. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) You And The Night And The Music - 1:55(Howard Dietz, Arthur Schwartz)
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 549 — I've Got A Crush On You   (1995)
Avid Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Avc 876 — Peggy Lee ("The Essential Collection" Series)    (2007)
b. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) What Is This Thing Called Love? - 2:00(Cole Porter)
Avid Collectors' Label CD(United Kingdom) Avc 549 — I've Got A Crush On You   (1995)
Avid Public Domain CD(United Kingdom) Avc 876 — Peggy Lee ("The Essential Collection" Series)    (2007)
c. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) Exactly Like You - 1:00(Jimmy McHugh, Dorothy Fields)
d. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) I Got Rhythm - 0:57(George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin)
e. ExtantBing Crosby Show (CBS) They Can't Take That Away From Me - 1:14(George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin)
All titles on:
Armed Forces Radio Service 16" Transcription DiscShow 49 — [Bing Crosby] General Electric Bing Crosby Show   (1953)
Redmond Nostalgia Collectors' Label commercial CDrCd 168 — [Bing Crosby] The Bing Crosby Show   





Photos

The Smokin' Hot Piper Series, continued. Part XXXI.


Schedule

The episode's date of recording (Sunday, November 8) is given by both of my main Crosby sources (chronicler Malcolm Macfarlane, radio authority Lionel Pairpoint). Neither expert offers data about rehearsals. Macfarlane adds that the November 15 episode of the show was also recorded on this date.


Personnel

1. Guest
Serving as the episode's only guest was, as both Ken Carpenter and Bing Crosby often billed her, Miss Peggy Lee.

2. Buddy Cole
Bing Crosby acknowledges pianist Buddy Cole's prominent participation in an instrumental rendition of "Invitation," featuring the entire John Scott Trotter Orchestra. Cole is presumed to have been the pianist backing Lee during her numbers, too.

3. Peggy Lee Solos and Duets
For her last-known appearance in his radio shows, Peggy Lee and Bing Crosby returned to a medley of standards that they had previously performed in the show: "Exactly Like You" (November 10, 1948), "I Got Rhythm" (February 11, 1948; November 10, 1948), "They Can't Take That Away From Me" (February 11, 1948; April 7, 1948; November 10, 1948), and the Lee solo "What Is This Thing Called Love" (November 10, 1948). Separately from the medley, Peggy Lee shone on a solo rendition of "You And The Night And The Music."


Patter

1. Banter
2. Prelude To "You And The Night And The Music"
Bing: Now, ladies and gentlemen, here's this evening's guest. The lovely singing star Miss Peggy Lee.
Peggy: Hi, Bing.
Bing: Hi, Peg.
Peggy: Hey, Bing, are you really gonna do a TV show?
Bing: Oh, yes. It's nerve-wrecking, isn't it?
Peggy: Ooh, it's a breeze. I just finished some shows with Perry Como.
Bing: Oh. Perry Como.
Peggy: Um-hmm.
Bing: What does he do on television?
Peggy: He sings!
Bing: Aw shucks, that's what I plan to do.
Peggy: Well, don't worry, Bing. In TV there's always room for one more.
Bing: Oh, boy, am I glad to hear that. Well, on this subject, Peg, you have a song for us now?
Peggy: Yes, I thought I'd do You And The Night And The Music.
Bing: Ah, you are in a nostalgic mood this evening, I gather.
Peggy: Oh, very.
Bing: I'm sure Mr. Trotter will give you his undivided attention.
After Lee finishes performing, and as the audience applauds, Crosby adds:
"Oh, I loved it, Peggy. Yes, a wonderful arrangement. You sang it beautifully."

3. Introducing A Medley of Favorites
Peggy Lee's final performance for The Bing Crosby Show is a medley of standards, which she sings mostly in duet with the host. Transcribed below is the dialogue heard between the selections.
Bing: ... I'll get to the other task at hand -- that is, if Peggy Lee is ready.
[Moment of silence.]
Peggy: Right here, Bing.
Bing: Folks, Peggy and I would like to sing some of our favorite tunes -- sort of ad-lib 'em in the proper fashion. I hope we run across some of your favorites, too. Will you start, Peggy?
Peggy: Sure.
[Lee sings "What Is This Thing Called Love."]
Bing: Oh, I liked it, Peggy. It was real good. Will you join me now in "Exactly Like You?"
Peggy: Glad to.
[Crosby and Lee sing "Exactly Like You."]
Bing: Nice, Peggy, nice.
Peggy: Thank you. Take a solo, Bing.
Bing: __. I might try that.
[Crosby's solo is "You Are Too Beautiful."]
Bing: Thank you. Peggy, lest we get too relaxed here, too cozy, too snug, I think we better get to switch to something more lively, ah?
Peggy: Well, you think, uh, I Got Rhythm would do it?
Bing: Ah, never miss here. We'll let the jazz band in here, too. Take off their shackles. Unmuscle 'em. Get with us, boys.
[A lively but short, one-chorus duet version of I Got Rhythm is sung, with hot jazz backing by all the ensemble.]
Bing: Everybody still here?
Peggy: That was jolly.
Bing: That jumped enough for you? Good. Should we rest up on a ballad, Peggy?
Peggy: Well, how about, uh, They Can't Take That Away From Me?
Bing: One of the best. I love it.
[After "They Can't Take That Away From Me", Crosby closes the segment as follows.]
Bing: Thanks, Peggy, thank you very much. As always, your visit here tonight was most enjoyable. Very listenable, too.


The Case Of The King Named Peggy
(March 14, 1954)





Dating : March 14, 1954 (Broadcast Date) (Pre-taped February 28, 1954).
Label: The Bing Crosby Show For General Electric (2nd Season)


An Erroneous Entry

The index of The Red Nichols Story: After Intermission, 1942-1965 (written by Philip R. Evans, Stanley Hester, Stephen Hester, and Linda Evans) lists Peggy Lee as making an appearance on this episode. The listing is a mistake. Crosby's guest on that episode was not Peggy Lee but Peggy King.

For the record, King sang a solo performances of "Rock-A-Bye Your Baby (With A Dixie Melody)." King and Crosby were also heard doing a "That's Amore" duet.


Photos

The Smokin' Hot Piper Series, concluded. Part XXXII.




The Bing-Along Airplayers: Key Members Of Crosby's Radio Team
(Appendix)


The present section purports to identify the key personnel behind the making and development of Bing Crosby's radio shows. Viewers interested in the crooner's radio career may also want to consult my separate, more chronologically oriented essay on the matter.






This gallery grants pride of place to advertising agent scriptwriter Carroll Carroll (real name: Carroll Weinshenk), seen laughing next to a happily smiling Bing Crosby. Through his tailored radio scripts, Carroll is credited with adapting Bing's persona to the realm of radio (and vice versa). Their collaboration began in 1936, about two months after the crooner started his long-term hosting of NBC's Kraft Music Hall (1936-1946). In the spring of that year, Carroll, then based in New York, was asked to move to California and take over script duties of the show. The entity doing the asking was J. Walter Thompson, the ad agency that kept Carroll employed, and which held the Kraft account. The motivation behind the request was probably manifold. For starters, the show's original scriptwriter -- a Sam Moore -- was leaving the agency. Second, the initial press reviews of the show's edition under Crosby had proven to be less than enthusiastic. Then there was Carroll's already standing relationship with Kraft. He had been one of the several men who, back in 1933, had conceived the original edition of this show (i.e., The Kraft Music Revue).

In his autobiography Call Me Lucky, Crosby tells us that Carroll "seemed to have an ear for the way I talked, and he encouraged me to incorporate as many of my own words as possible into the script. He’d send a script around to my home and I’d try to rewrite the speeches he’d written for me so as to make them sound even more like me. And I’d try to put in little jokes if I could think of any. Most of them were clumsy and pointless, but once in a while I hit something mildly amusing and Carroll wouldn’t delete it if he thought it had a chance of getting a laugh. The way we worked together resulted in the next thing to ad libbing." For his part, Carroll Weinshenk remembers how he gained a better grasp of The Old Groaner's speech patterns and cool demeanor by following him around on the NBC set, whenever possible. The twosome also established a routine of lunching together on the day of the show, usually in a quiet room (rather than the main, self-exhibiting room) at the famous Brown Derby, located nearby. Carroll Carroll stuck around for entire duration of Crosby's Kraft Music Hall era (1936-1946). When the J. Walter Thompson requested his move back from California to New York (in order to contribute to the many other radio shows in development there), the New Yorker obliged. Nevertheless, he would wound up leaving the agency within that same year, and returning to California to work for the LA branch of another advertising company (Ward Wheelock). This back-and-forth pattern between NY and CA would continue for his lifetime, and would include another long stay at the NY branch J. Walter Thompson, as well as incursions into the worlds of ghosting autobiographies and writing for variety TV.


After Carroll's departure in 1946, the task of writing and co-producing Crosby's shows fell on Bill Morrow (second photo above, taken in 1939). A press agent and newspaper reporter while in his native state, the Chicagoan made his first mark in the Hollywood entertainment industry after moving to LA in the mid-1930s, to take over as one of the two co-writers (the other being Ed Beloin) of the very popular Jell-o Program Starring Jack Benny. Indeed, the third photo above shows Morrow and Benny standing side by side, on the steps of the NBC compound on its opening day -- October 25, 1938, or thereabouts. (Sitting is comedic actor Andy Devine, an informal member of the show's cast. Morrow is the man in the middle.) The studio behind them could be C, next to which other Jack Benny pictures were taken on that same day. Since the front entrance of all the studios looked just about identical, we could be looking at any of the other NBC Hollywood Radio City studios as well. The most suitable candidate would actually be B, because that studio served, from its inception, as the headquarters of both Jack Benny's and Bing Crosby's shows.

In early 1937, William Morrow would contribute at least one script for Crosby's show (early 1937). He might have co-authored a few other earlier scripts as well, especially before the arrival of New Yorker Carroll Carroll. Meanwhile, the Chicagoan's standing as co-writer of The Jell-o Show remained firm, spanning all the way from the 1936-1937 to the 1942-1943 seasons. In addition to putting a dent on his life of bachelor partying, Morrow's wartime service (1943-1946) acted as a transitional period between his Benny and Bing years. Once back, he worked as head writer and co-producer of Crosby's radio shows until his last days of radio hosting (1960s), also writing in the interim the screenplay for one of his road movies (Bali), and the scripts for some of his TV programming. It is thus Morrow's writing that we enjoy through the years that Peggy Lee appeared in Crosby's show as either a semi-regular member or a frequent guest. (The shows' co-producer was Murdo MacKenzie, who will be one of our subjects below.)

On the second row above, the first photo is said to date from the early years of Kraft Music Hall. I do not count with any identification or helpful data about those present, other than a questionable reference to their being the show's scriptwriters. (Note the script pages all over the floor.) Obviously, such description would not strictly apply to Bing Crosby (standing behind the NBC microphone) or to the show's announcer, Ken Carpenter, on the far right. The lady could be one of several female singers who worked for short periods on Crosby's edition of the Kraft show. (She resembles Trudy Irwin, in particular.) If she is instead a scriptwriter, one possibility could be Jane Tucker, known for her contributions to shows such as the aforementioned one by Jack Benny. (Among the many other possibilities would be a June Hill to whom Peggy Lee referred once in 1947, while naming people who worked on the show.) We are also left to wonder about the identity of the two men to the left of Bing. Rather than scriptwriters, could they possibly be from the show's executive team? Could one of these men be Cal Kuhl (aka Henry Calvin Kuhl), regular producer and director for most of Crosby's edition of Kraft Music Hall? (Kuhl, also a top ad agent at J. Walter Thompson, was another of the several men whoo conceived the original edition of the Kraft show. He appears to have continued his work on the show after Crosby left it. Still as a member of J. Walter Thompson, he transitioned to television, where he continued to direct shows from clients that had graduated from radio, such as Lux Video Theater.)

We stand on more concrete ground as we scan the next photo, taken in 1947. Standing in front of two Magnetophon recorders are Murdo MacKenzie (left) and Jack Mullin (right). MacKenzie was a NBC audio engineer who also became something like Crosby's second hand. Back in late 1935, NBC had put the radio engineer in charge of wiring the crooner's audition episodes for Kraft Music Hall from Hollywood to New York. From the rest of the 1930s to the 1960s, MacKenzie became not only Crosby's show editor of choice but also a top figure within Bing Crosby Enterprises.

Jack Mullin was the engineer who sold them on the pioneering notion of recording radio programming with the magnetic tape objects on display. MacKenzie was first exposed to Mullin's idea (then a novel one in the US) at a demonstration made to the Hollywood world of filmmaking in 1947. Mullin subsequently took the idea to Crosby, who became highly enthusiastic about its potential -- especially bearing in mind how convenient it would be to pre-record programming. Mullin thus went on to work closely with Bing Crosby Enterprises.





The man on all three photographs above is Ken Carpenter, another key member of Crosby's world of radio. He too had been an ad man at one point early in his career (as well as an insurance salesman and newspaper copywriter), but at the age of 29 he found his vocation when local Hollywood station KFI hired him as a staff announcer (1929). An affiliate of NBC-Red, KFI assigned to Carpenter popular sports events such as the UCLA and USC football games, which gradually increased listeners' familiarity with his delivery. Greater exposure became a possibility with the 1934 departure of the more established sports announcer at the station, Don Wilson, gone to serve as announcer for comedian Jack Benny's show. After Carpenter anchored the 1935 Rose Bowl on his own, many work offers from large advertisement agencies and other nationwide enterprises came his way.

At that point in time, J. Walter Thompson decided to endow Bing Crosby with his own announcer (as opposed to continuing to have Bing share Jack Benny's main man, Don Wilson). Crosby was among the many listeners who had gained an appreciation for Carpenter's voice after listening to the Rose Bowl broadcast. (Biographer Gary Giddins adds that, during Crosby's early 1930s days as a member of The Rhythm Boys, Carpenter had been the master of ceremonies for their broadcasts from the Cocoanut Grove.) By the 10th or 11th episode of Kraft Music Hall (February 1936), the Great Announcer had thus joined the Old Groaner.

Carpenter went on to announce for J. Walter Thompson shows, too (e.g., the aforementioned Lux Video Theater, Al Jolson's edition of Kraft Music Hall, etc.). As the years went by, his voice was heard also in a staggering amount of film, radio and TV programming. Nonetheless, Crosby remained his routinary, steady source of work for the entire duration of the variety radio era. The images of the two of them above stem from Crosby's TV work in the 1950s. The solo image was originally published in 1948, and was most likely taken while Carpenter was working for Philco Radio Time.





Shown in all three images above, John Scott Trotter might have been the work partner with whom Bing Crosby had his closes and friendliest relationship -- maybe even above his family members. (Bing's aforementioned relationships with Ken Carpenter and Murdo MacKenzie were also long-lasting, but both seem to have been circumscribed to a strictly professional realm, however consistently cordial.) A pianist by trade, Trotter first made a dent in the world of music as arranger and ivory tickler for Hal Kemp, of whose band he was already a member around 1926, when both men were college students enrolled at the University of South Carolina. Following his departure from Kemp's band some ten years later, Trotter went on to the West Coast strictly on vacation but instead wounded up arranging the score for the movie Pennies from Heaven, starring --and co-produced by-- Bing Crosby himself.

Nevertheless, Trotter did not properly join the Crosby fold until the July 8, 1937 episode of Kraft Music Hall. Previously, the show's musical accompaniment had been provided by Jimmy Dorsey and his band. With Dorsey now leaving (due, according to some sources, to the sponsor's request to add to the show a classical music segment, which Dorsey did not have the training to fulfill; or due, according to the bandleader and other sources, to Dorsey's desire to maximize his hit-making band's exposure through means outside the constricting walls of backing a weekly variety show), Crosby's executive/business/PR team (his father, his brother Everett and, in this specific, his brother Larry) made Trotter an offer to be the show's bandleader. Of the photos above, the middle one is from 1947 (the Philco Radio Time period), the other two respectively from around 1942 and 1943 (the Kraft Music Hall period).

Trotter became a lot more than a radio show bandleader, as Crosby also made him his regular conductor and arranger on most of his Decca recording sessions, not to say anything of a frequent home visitor who established close friendships with both his first and second wife. In the radio field, the arranger-conductor steadfastly remained doing work for Crosby until 1954, when the Groaner had to slash his budget as part of his shift from network to sustained radio programming. They would still work together on television, from the singer's very first TV special in 1954 to his short-lived, one-season-long situation comedy show in 1964 (both called The Bing Crosby Show).






Seen above are the musicians who this discographer knows (in some cases) or believes (in other cases) to have been the regular rhythm section for most installments of the radio show under discussion. First up is pianist and organist Buddy Cole, who was not yet 25 when he backed Bing Crosby for the very first time. The occasion was their recording of a song to be debuted on Swing With Bing, a 1940 film short promoting the Crosby-hosted and devised Annual Gold [Pro-Amateur] Tournament, then held at Rancho Santa Fe Golf Club, in Southern California. Thereafter, I have found any trace of the men's involvement with one another until a Decca session held on September 13, 1945, featuring Crosby with Mel Tormé's The Meltones and a rhythm section. (Cole could have also been part of any number of earlier orchestral Decca sessions, for which I do not have personnel.) He officially joined Crosby's radio fold at the very start of the 1947-1948 Philco Radio Time season. As the years went by, Mr. Edwin Lemar Cole increasingly took over Mr. John Scott Trotter's duties -- at Decca dates and, far more decisively, on the radio, throughout the years that Crosby's programming became sustained (1954-1962). The image above is a snapshot from Crosby's 1954 TV special, which had the pair doing a performance of "It Had To Be You." Sadly, a 49-year-old Cole died in his sleep, of a heart attack. During the days preceding his passing, he had been assiduously recording organ music for inclusion in the film The Sound Of Music, and preparing charts for Crosby's situation comedy TV show, which Trotter went on to score instead.

In addition to Cole and Crosby, the other men pictured above are bassist Phil Stephens (second image, ca. 1942), guitarist Perry Botkin Sr., and drummer Nick Fatool (fifth image, date and details unknown). Botkin is deserving of two photos because of his varied and lengthy history of work with Bing. We find him in many Crosby sessions from 1941 onwards, especially during the late 1940s and early 1950s. He probably was also part of earlier Decca sessions for which personnel is not identified in the sources at my reach. Similarly, I see him listed for the first time on the November 25, 1937 episode of Kraft Music Hall, but chances are that he had been working on the show since much earlier.

Indeed, Crosby biographer Gary Giddins names Botkin among the musicians recruited by John Scott Trotter when he joined the show (ca. July 8, 1937). The biographer elaborates as follows: ... most important, Perry Botkin, who had worked as a New York session man with Victor Young, Red Nichols and Crosby himself, on the later Brunswicks [1931-1934]. Like Trotter, Perry was a large man and a Crosby loyalist; he occupied [former Crosby guitarist's] Eddie Lang's chair for the next two decades. He was also a studio politician, and Trotter appointed him contractor, in charge of hirings.

Here, Botkin himself is heard giving his total number of years with Crosby as 17. The first of the Botkin-Crosby photos above appears to be a publicity shot from around 1950, perhaps taken during a break at a film studio. The shot doubles as promotion for the Decca album that the guitarist is holding: his own Learn To Play The Ukulele. (Bing is presumably showing to viewers how easily he has learned, thanks to the album. Though it appeared on a magazine issue published in November 1947, the other photo of the guitar-ukulele player with the singing-acting star was most probably taken on February 7, 1946, at Kraft Music Hall. The magazine's caption reveals that Bing and Botkin are preparing to do "These Foolish Things." For more pictures of Bing playing a musician, see the indexes down below, amidst which I have incorporated a whole series of such pictures.)

As for the other two men yet to be discussed, both were excellent session players with a vast resume as backing musicians for a wide variety of artists -- Peggy Lee herself included, during the second half of the 1940s. Nick Fatool actually shared with Lee an earlier period of apprenticeship with Benny Goodman's band. The songstress continued to work with him well past her early Capitol days and into her her mid-1950s Decca studio sessions. For his part, bass and tuba player Phil Stephens had had his apprenticeship with the Tommy Dorsey band. (Indeed, the above-seen photo of Stephens is from a live performance with the band.) Hence it should not come as a surprise that he was the bass played on most of the Dorsey-Sinatra sessions from the early 1940s, or that he went on to play in a huge number of Sinatra solo sessions, from his Columba through his Capitol to the Reprise years. Both Fatool and Stephens joined Buddy Cole to form the so-called Buddy Cole Trio that accompanied Bing for most of his sustained radio performances (1954-1962).

Biographer Gary Giddins makes mention of several other musicians who were recruited by John Scott Trotter during the Kraft Music Hall period. Unfortunately, I have no evidence that the named musicians were still playing for Crosby during the Philco, Chesterfield, and General Electric editions of the show. Still, even specifics are scarce, there is merit in quoting Giddins' list herein: [i]n selecting musicians for the band, a new experience for Trotter, he drew on Hollywood studio players and added a small string section (it grew over the years) to the conventional big-band instrumentation. To sustain the swing and spontaneity Bing demanded, he peppered the ensemble with jazz musicians, including two former [Paul] Whiteman trumpeters, Andy Secrest ... and (when he could get him) Manny Klein ....Trotter also recruited trombonist Abe Lincoln ... drummer Spike Jones. An article published on the April 4, 1941 issue of Overture (the magazine of the American Federation of Musicians, Chapter 47) adds that Trotter's orchestra consisted of 19 men.

The 1941 magazine article also refers to a policy established by Crosby and company, to the effect of alternating guest spots between an invited star one week, and a member of the orchestra on the other week. The members said to have been already singled out for such special treatment were guitarist Perry Botkin (first and foremost), pianist Charles La Vere, and cornetist Andy Secrest, with saxophonist Jack Mayhew and violinist Sam Freed next in line. An accompanying photo separately showcases trombonist John Kipper "Spike" Wallace -- not surprisingly, when we consider that he was the local chapter's president for the entire decade. Yet to be mentioned, we see violinist Joe Venuti featured as a guest in quite a few episodes of the Philco, Chesterfield, and General Electric editions of the show. I suspect that he was a regular or semi-regular member of Trotter's orchestra, and that such guest appearances fell within a pattern similar to the one described in the 1941 AFM magazine issue.







We conclude this appendix by honoring the two satirists whose music parodies greatly enhanced several episodes of The Bing Crosby Show. It is to these two writer-pianists (particularly Burrows) that we owe some of Peggy Lee's comical impersonations in song: for instance, "Louisa From Lake Louise," or the Shakespearean "I'm Sweet, Shy Ofelia."

Seen in the first row above, Abe Burrows guested on five episodes of Crosby's program, three of them from the Philco era, two from the Chesterfield era. Peggy Lee happened to be present on all five episodes, and to substantially partake in the festive scripts. (Burrows and Lee would work together again in 1960, for a Revlon -sponsored TV special.) Abram Solman Borowitz worked as an accountant and salesman before his innate sense of humor gave him entry to the worlds of nightclub and radio scriptwriting. On television, Burrows became best known for his appearances on panel and game shows. Between his radio and television years, he recorded three vocal albums that were released on the same year (1950), one for Columbia and the others for Decca. On Broadway, he co-wrote or doctored the books of quite a few shows, with the highlights being the Pulitzer Prize-winning Loesser oeuvres Guys And Dolls and How To Succeed In Business Without Really Trying. He also directed and produced.

Shown in the second row above, Alec Templeton guested on eight episodes of Crosby's show, three from the Kraft Music Hall era and five from the Philco Radio Time era. Only two of those featured Lee as well, and her interaction with the pianist was not extensive. (However, she guested on Templeton's own radio shows at least twice, and participated on the musical parodies that he wrote for his show.) Blind since birth, Alec Andrew Templeton was a child prodigy who was already playing at BBC at the age of twelve, and composing a Trio for flute, oboe and piano by the age of eighteen. Born in Wales, he first came to the US in 1935 (when he was in his twenties), as part of the British orchestra of Jack Hylton, and by the next year he was making his solo debut on record. On American radio, he became popular quite quickly (second half of the 1930s) thanks to his rare talent for both serious classical playing and satirical parody of the classics. By December 4, 1939, Time magazine was already referring to him as the "blind, brilliant Alec Templeton" who "in two months ... had won some 6,000,000 listeners" at NBC-Red. The magazine also wanted its viewers to know that the source of his his no secret; his musical lampoons spare nobody, from his keyboard come chuckles for all ... He embroiders five-note themes tossed up by audiences until they sound like Wagner. His "Back Goes To Town," a swing classic, is now part of the pentateuch that includes "Mendelssohn Mows 'em Down," "Mozart Matriculates," "Haydn Takes To Ridin'," "Debussy In Dubuque." He officially became an American citizen in 1941, proceeding to build not only careers in radio and television but also a sizable catalogue of piano recordings, distributed over quite a few labels -- ABC, Columbia, Decca, Mercury, RCA Victor, and other companies.


Indexes And Inventories
Peggy Lee's Performances On Bing Crosby's Radio Shows






The following index lists all of Peggy Lee's performances on Bing Crosby radio programming. Also included is the broadcast date for each performance.


A. Solo Vocals
1+. Bali Ha'i (April 27, 1949)
2+. Bali Ha'i (May 11, 1949)
3. Dream Is A Wish Your Heart Makes, A (February 8, 1950)
4. For Sentimental Reasons (March 26, 1947)
5. Golden Earrings (February 25, 1948)
6. Happiness Is A Thing Called Joe (March 12, 1947)
7+. He's Just My Kind (January 1, 1947)
8+. He's Just My Kind (February 12, 1947)
9. I Don't Know Enough About You (May 2, 1946)
10+. I Got Lucky In The Rain (December 29, 1948; for a duet version, see list B, below)
11. I Gotta Right To Sing The Blues (October 19, 1949)
12+. I Wanna Go Where You Go (Then I'll Be Happy) (December 15, 1948; for a duet version, see list B below)
13. I'll Close My Eyes (April 23, 1947)
14. I'm Comin', Virginia (January 25, 1950)
15+. I’ve Got A Crush On You (November 15, 1953; for duet versions, see list B, below)
16. It Takes A Long, Long Train With A Red Caboose (October 1, 1947)
17. It's All Over Now (December 18, 1946)
18. It's Lovin' Time (February 5, 1947)
19. Just An Old Love Of Mine (October 8, 1947)
20. Just One Of Those Things (February 26, 1953)
21. Just Squeeze Me (March 19, 1947)
22. Linger In My Arms A Little Longer (December 11, 1946)
23*. Louisa From Lake Louise (September 21, 1949)
24. Love, Your (Magic) Spell Is Everywhere (October 27, 1948)
25. Lover (June 18, 1952)
26. Nightingale Can Sing The Blues, A (April 16, 1947)
27*. Ophelia's Blues (I'm Sweet, Shy Ophelia) (September 28, 1949)
28. Orange-colored Sky (December 13, 1950)
29. Smoke Gets In Your Eyes: Astaire Movie Medley (April 7, 1948)
30. So Dear To My Heart (January 26, 1949)
31. Speaking Of Angels (April 9, 1947)
32. Trouble Is A Man (January 12, 1949)
33*. Was Last Night The Last Night With You? (February 25, 1948)
34+. What Is This Thing Called Love? (November 10, 1948)
35+. What Is This Thing Called Love? (November 29, 1953)
36. What More Can A Woman Do (January 8, 1947)
37. When Is Sometime? (March 9, 1949)
38. When You Speak With Your Eyes (January 11, 1950)
39. Why Don't You Do Right? (unclear; allegedly, May 7, 1947)
40. Wonderful Guy, A (October 12, 1949)
41. Would I Love You (Love You, Love You) (February 21, 1950)
42. You And The Night And The Music (November 29, 1953)
43. You Go To My Head (June 25, 1952)






B. Duets, Trios, And Quartets
All performances feature Peggy Lee in the company of Bing Crosby, unless otherwise indicated.
44. Again (October 12, 1949)
45. Ain't We Got Fun: College Medley (November 15, 1953)
46*. Allá En El Rancho Grande (Trio with Gary Cooper; October 1, 1947)
47. Baby, You Can Count On Me (January 1, 1947)
48. Bebop Spoken Here (April 27, 1949)
49+. Best Man, The (February 12, 1947)
50+. Best Man, The (March 12, 1947)
51. Betty Co-Ed: College Medley (November 15, 1953)
52. Blue Hawaii (May 11, 1949)
53*. Boise, Idaho (February 25, 1948)
54. Bushel And A Peck, A (December 13, 1950)
55*. California (Trio with Abe Burrows; January 26, 1949)
56*. Catalogue Day: Astaire Movie Medley (Trio with Fred Astaire; April 7, 1948)
57. Cheek To Cheek: Astaire Movie Medley (April 7, 1948)
58*. Collegiate: College Medley (November 15, 1953)
59. Cuánto Le Gusta (December 29, 1948)
60. Dearly Beloved: Astaire Movie Medley (April 7, 1948)
61. Down The Old Ox Road (April 23, 1949)
62+. Easter Parade (March 24, 1948)
63+. Easter Parade (April 13, 1949)
64*. Everything Is OK In Denmark (Trio with Abe Burrows; September 28, 1949)
65. Everything's Moving Too Fast (December 18, 1946)
66+. Exactly Like You (November 10, 1948)
67+. Exactly Like You (November 29, 1953)
68. Far Away Places (May 11, 1949)
69. Fine Romance, A: Astaire Movie Medley (April 7, 1948)
70*. Happy, Happy, Happy Days (Trio with Abe Burrows; February 23, 1949)
71. Here Comes Santa Claus (December 7, 1949)
72+. How It Lies, How It Lies, How It Lies (May 11, 1949)
73+. How It Lies, How It Lies, How It Lies (October 12, 1949)
74+. I Got Lucky In The Rain (January 26, 1949; for a solo version, see list A, above)
75+. I Got Rhythm (February 11, 1948)
76+. I Got Rhythm (November 10, 1948)
77+. I Got Rhythm (November 29, 1953)
78. I Still Suits Me (April 16, 1947)
79+. I Wanna Go Where You Go (Then I'll Be Happy) (February 23, 1949; for a solo version, see list A, above)
80+. I’ve Got A Crush On You (February 11, 1948; for a solo version, see list A, above)
81.+ I’ve Got A Crush On You (October 12, 1949; for a solo version, see list A, above)
82. Isn’t This A Lovely Day?: Astaire Movie Medley (Duet with Fred Astaire; April 7, 1948)
83*. It Means That We Are We (February 23, 1949)
84+. It's A Good Day (Dec. 11, 1946)
85+. It's A Good Day (January 8, 1947)
86+. It's A Good Day (March 19, 1947)
87+. It's A Good Day (April 23, 1947)
88*. It’s About Time That I Wrote To The Folks In Terra Haute (February 25, 1948)
89. It's More Fun Than A Picnic (October 19, 1949)
90. Just The Way You Are (February 21, 1951)
91*. Kamehameha Day: Astaire Movie Medley (Trio with Fred Astaire; April 7, 1948)
92+. Little Bird Told Me, A (Trio with Bob Crosby; December 1, 1948)
93+. Little Bird Told Me, A (Duo; December 15, 1948)
94. Little Jack Frost, Get Lost (January 11, 1950)
95+. Mañana (March 24, 1948)
96[+]. Mañana [Christmas Version] (December 7, 1949)
97. Maybe It's Because (I Love You Too Much) (September 21, 1949)
98. Maybe You'll Be There (December 29, 1948)
99. Moon Came Up With A Great Idea Last Night, The (June 25, 1952)
100*. [Musical Commercial] Everyday Is A Philco Day (Trio with Fred Astaire; April 7, 1949)
101*. [Musical Commercial] Mr. Crosby And Mr. Templeton For Philco (Quartet With Ken Carpenter and Alec Templeton; April 9, 1947)
102*. [Musical Commercial] Chesterfield Satisfies (October 12, 1949)
103*. [Musical Commercial] Chesterfield Summer Vacation (June 25, 1952)
104*. [Musical Commercial] The Philco Dittendorten National Anthem (February 23, 1949)
105*. [Musical Commercial] Sound Off For Chesterfield (June 18, 1952)
106*. [Musical Commercial] You Ought To Get A Portable Philco (May 11, 1949)
107+. On A Slow Boat To China (December 1, 1948)
108+. On A Slow Boat To China (December 15, 1948)
109[+]*. On A Slow Mule To Memphis And Macon (Trio with Johnny Mercer; January 12, 1949)
110. Once And For Always (March 9, 1949)
111+. 'S Wonderful (February 11, 1948)
112+. 'S Wonderful (November 15, 1953)
113*. She's The Sweetheart Of Delta Delta Tau (Duet with Abe Burrows; April 27, 1949)
114. Silver Bells (December 13, 1950)
115+. So In Love (February 23, 1949)
116+. So In Love (March 9, 1949)
117. Stay Well (December 7, 1949)
118. Summertime (February 11, 1948)
119+. Sunshine Cake (January 25, 1950)
120+. Sunshine Cake (February 8, 1950)
121. That's A-Plenty (February 26, 1953)
122*. These Lush Moments (February 25, 1948)
123+. They Can’t Take That Away From Me (February 11, 1948)
124+. They Can’t Take That Away From Me (November 10, 1948)
125+. They Can’t Take That Away From Me(November 29, 1953)
126+. They Can’t Take That Away From Me: Astaire Movie Medley (April 7, 1948)
127. Thousand Violins, A (November 23, 1949)
128*. Tortured (February 25, 1948)
129*. Upper Peabody Technological College (Trio with Abe Burrows, April 27, 1949)
130. Varsity Drag: College Medley, The (November 15, 1953)
131. Watermelon Weather (June 18, 1952)
132. 'Way Back Home (November 23, 1949)
133*. We Love The Canadian Rockies (Trio With Abe Burrows; September 21, 1949)
134*. When You're In Love With The Lover You Love (January 26, 1949)
135. White Christmas: Astaire Movie Medley (April 7, 1948)
136. You Came A Long Way From St. Louis (October 27, 1948)
137. You Was (March 16, 1949)
138*. You’re In Love With Someone (September 28, 1949)
139. Zing A Little Zong (June 25, 1952)







C. Codes

1. The + Sign
In the listings above, a plus sign serves as indication that Peggy Lee performed the given song more than once in Crosby radio programming.

2. The * Sign
In the listings above, an asterisk serves as indication that the given performance qualifies as special material or musical parody (as opposed to standards and popular songs of the day).


D. Inventory

1. Total Number Of Performances
The listings above show that Peggy Lee made a total of 139 performances for Bing Crosby radio programming. Of those, 43 were solo vocals, and 96 were duets or trios.

2. Reprisals: "It's A Good Day"
As attested by the above-seen listings, Lee sang some selections on more than one episode of the show. The most reprised number was one of her own compositions, "It's A Good Day," which she and Crosby performed as a duet in 4 different episodes.

3. Total Number Of Song Titles
When the reprises are subtracted from the 139 total number of performances, the new and reduced total comes to 113 or 115 songs. (Depending on the viewer's opinion, two of these reprises could be excluded, or they could kept. One reprise is the Christmas version of "Mañana," which features the same music as but different lyrics from the original version. The other number is "On A Slow Boat To Memphis And Macon," which is a parody of "On A Slow Boat To China," with the same music but, once again, different lyrics.)


E. Photos

Top: more images of El Bingo -- that debonair, ever-cool piper. First up is an iconic drawing, featuring most things Bing: the Panama hat, the English pipe, the Hawaiian shirt and, to further bring the point home, a hammock. (Only a golf club is missing.) The context or story behind the next, "Bing's Things, Inc." photo is not known to me. Since the credit at the bottom of the photo reads "another one of Dino's Things, Inc., Hollywood, Calif.," I am left to wonder if we are looking at a setup created in jest, and involving Dean Martin. The third photo proves that neither cozy hammock nor tropical weather are required when you are in the mood for lounging ... provided that you are as cool and collected as Crosby.

Second row: somebody is too sexy for his shorts. (Right, said Bing.) On the third photo, the crooner is accompanied by two of his consorts: first wife, Dixie Lee, and love of a lifetime, Miss Mouthpiece -- both smoking, as far as Harry Lillis was concerned.

Third row: portrait of a man for all seasons and all instruments. This mini-gallery showcases Le Bing as player of musical instruments -- or, in most cases, as a jolly pretender. In the bottom row, he is happily ceding the spotlight to tw:o greater groaners than his self: a howling coyote and a growling specimen of a man. One of those two was Jimmy McPartland, the celebrated Chicago cornetist and pianist partner of a certain Marian (no relation to Robin or the hood).

Below: Le Bing bids us adieu in a series of color shots, on which he is playfully grimacing and finger-pointing -- as well as a-whistling and a-winking at us, too.






Sessions Reported: 49

Performances Reported: 139

Unique Songs Reported: 115

Unique Issues Reported: 210